GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

Andrew J. Policano, Dean

202 Graduate School of Management
Office of Admissions and Marketing: (949) 824-4622
Fax: (949) 824-2944
E-mail: gsm-mba@uci.edu
World Wide Web: http://www.gsm.uci.edu/

Ph.D. Program

Master's Programs

Undergraduate Minors

Courses

Faculty

Dennis J. Aigner, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Management and Economics (applied econometrics, statistics, operations research)

Lisa A. Barron, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Management (negotiation and communication, relationship between beliefs and behaviors, diversity and gender in organizations, intergroup relations)

Christine M. Beckman, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Management (creation, transformation and influence of inter-organizational relationships, organizational learning and change, entrepreneurship, diversity, women, and organizations)

Michael W. Berns, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Surgery, Developmental and Cell Biology, Biomedical Engineering, and Management, and Arnold and Mabel Beckman Chair in Laser Biomedicine

David H. Blake, Ph.D. Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, Professor of Management (international business, business strategy, leadership)

George W. Brown, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of Management (mathematical statistics, game theory, dynamic decision processes, operations research, computer design, operation, applications, information networks)

Thomas C. Buchmueller, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison, Associate Professor of Management, Economics, and Social Ecology (economics of health care)

Reynold Byers, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Assistant Professor of Management (service operations management, financial service operations strategy, design and management of telephone centers, performance measurement in services)

Maria Chandler, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and Management

Nai-Fu Chen, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Management (financial investments, numerical analysis of systems of algebraic and differential equations, contingent claims)

Vidyanand Choudhary, Ph.D. Purdue University, Assistant Professor of Management (economics of information systems and emerging technologies)

Imran S. Currim, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Management (marketing management, modeling, research, strategy, new products)

Sanjeev Dewan, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Associate Professor of Management (value of information technology investments, electronic commerce, information technology in financial markets)

Joseph F. DiMento, Ph.D., J.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Social Ecology and Management (planning, land use and environmental law, use of social science in policy making, legal control of corporate behavior)

Marta M. Elvira, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Management (organizational reward structures, strategic human resources, international management, comparative institutional analysis, organizational diversity)

Henry Fagin, M.S. Columbia University, Professor Emeritus of Management (societal context of organizations)

Martha Feldman, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Social Ecology, Management, Sociology, and Political Science, and Roger W. and Janice M. Johnson Chair in Civic Governance and Public Management (organization theory and behavior, stability and change in organizations, decision making and information processing)

Paul J. Feldstein, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Management, Economics, and Social Ecology, and Robert Gumbiner Chair in Health Care Management (economics of health care)

Cristina Gibson, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Assistant Professor of Management (multicultural collaboration; communication, interaction, and effectiveness in teams; impact of culture and gender on work behavior; social cognition; international management)

Mary C. Gilly, Ph.D. University of Houston, Professor of Management (marketing management, marketing for nonprofit organizations, consumer behavior, services marketing)

John Graham, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Management (international marketing, management and strategy, international business negotiations, managing firms in volatile environments)

Vijay Gurbaxani, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Professor of Management and Informatics (information technology and business strategy; economics of information systems management; impact of information technology on organizations and market structure)

Joanna L. Ho, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Professor of Management (auditing, accounting decisions, managers' investment decision analysis in multinational companies)

Philippe Jorion, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Management and Economics (international finance)

L. Robin Keller, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Management (decision analysis, risk analysis, problem structuring, management science)

Bradley L. Killaly, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Management (evolutionary economics with specific attention to the causes of firm change, organizational decision making, learning, and organizational ecology, the relationship between organizational experience and performance)

Kenneth L. Kraemer, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Director of the Center for Research on Information Technology and Organizations, Professor of Management and Informatics, and Taco Bell Chair in Information Technology Management (organizational impacts of computing, management of computing, information technology and public policy)

Barbara A. Lougee, Ph.D. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Management (financial reporting, compensation, corporate governance)

Dmitry Lukin, Ph.D. Insead (France), Assistant Professor of Management (corporate finance, information economics, market microstructure)

Newton Margulies, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Management (organizational behavior, organizational change and development, analysis of team functioning, organizational behavior in health care organizations)

Joseph W. McGuire, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emeritus of Management (business strategy, entrepreneurship, organizational economics)

Martin C. McGuire, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of Economics and Management, and Clifford and Elaine Heinz Chair in the Economics and Public Policy of Peace (economic theory of group formation and behavior, economic models of international conflict, interactions between trading partnerships and military alliances in the structure of international relations)

Richard B. McKenzie, Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Professor of Management and Economics, and Walter B. Gerken Chair in Enterprise and Society (applied microeconomics and public sector economics)

Alexander Mood, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of Management

Peter Navarro, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Management (electric utilities regulation, growth management, industrial policy, public policy)

David M. Obstfeld, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Management (knowledge creation, innovation, social networks, entrepreneurial action within and between organizations, social skill)

Jone L. Pearce, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Management (organizational behavior, human resources management, organizational transformation in formerly communist countries, voluntary associations)

Cornelia Pechmann, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Professor of Management and Social Ecology (consumer behavior, advertising strategy, health care marketing, evaluation research)

Andrew J. Policano, Ph.D. Brown University, Dean of the Graduate School of Management and Professor of Management (financial institutions and markets, macroeconomics, monetary theory and policy)

Lyman W. Porter, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Management (organizational behavior, management education, personnel management)

Amelia C. Regan, Ph.D. University of Texas, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Management (transportation logistics, online freight marketplace, intermodal operations, commercial vehicle operator and firm behavior, shipper behavior and third party logistics)

Judy B. Rosener, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate School, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment, Management and Social Ecology (business and government, cultural diversity, gender and management)

Claudia B. Schoonhoven, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Management (organizational theory, strategic management of innovation and technology, entrepreneurship)

Carlton H. Scott, Ph.D. The University of New South Wales, Professor of Management and of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (operations research, production management, total quality management, statistics)

Charles Shi, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor of Management (capital market evaluation of a firm's intangible assets, Internet firm's valuation, accounting disclosures and performance of IPOs, accounting issues in emerging markets)

Kut C. So, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Management (operations management, design of production and inventory systems, operations research)

Neal M. Stoughton, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Management (mathematical and game theoretic models of corporate finance, futures markets, options markets, economics of information, agency theory)

Eli Talmor, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professor of Management (corporate finance, taxation, financial markets)

Rajeev Tyagi, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Associate Professor of Management (new product introductions)

Alladi Venkatesh, Ph.D. Syracuse University, Professor of Management and Informatics (social impacts of information technology, Internet and the New Economy, Smart Home technologies, children and multimedia)

Wenqing Wang, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Management (empirical asset pricing, liquidity, institutional investment behavior, learning)

Margarethe F. Wiersema, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Management (strategic management, corporate restructuring, core competencies, executive succession)

Fan Yu, Ph.D. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Management (derivatives, risk management, asset pricing theory)

Kevin Xiaoguo Zhu, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Management (economics of information systems, investment in information technologies, electronic commerce, real options, competition in the IT industry)

OVERVIEW

The Graduate School of Management (GSM) offers the M.B.A. (Master of Business Administration) degree, the Ph.D. degree in Management, and undergraduate minors in Management and Accounting. The Master's degree is professional in nature and is intended to provide future managers with a firm foundation in the basic disciplines and in management tools and techniques; the Ph.D. in Management is for those who wish to pursue a career in scholarly research. The undergraduate minor is designed for those who wish to gain some insight into issues of modern management, as well as those who anticipate future graduate work in Management.

Educational Objectives

The Graduate School of Management offers a generalist M.B.A. degree and a learning experience that prepares graduates for a lifetime of professional and personal growth with increasingly important enterprise-wide responsibilities. The rigorous curriculum, combined with extensive professional and interpersonal training and opportunities made available through the School's Career Services Office and Center for Leadership Development, allows students to gain theoretical perspectives that are in turn tested and affirmed with practical application. The result is an environment that fosters the development of professional and personal skills vital to contemporary executives or managers. Students are encouraged to develop their ability to lead change by mastering communication skills, to work productively and actively within a team-oriented environment, to gain a solid grasp of quantitative skills, and to appreciate and effectively employ those solutions that involve the integration and implementation of information and technology to offer creatively viable business options.

GSM has developed a strategic focus on Information Technology for Management (ITM), a theme that is incorporated in many areas of the curriculum. Although a solid grounding in basic business disciplines provides the foundation for effective management, GSM's graduates are encouraged to aim higher. They learn about change as it takes place within the context of a knowledge-based, technology-driven society where information and its effective use are vital to establishing a competitive edge. GSM students, whether they are interested in finance, marketing, general management, strategic planning, accounting, operations, health care, human resources, international business, or other areas, will be thoroughly imbued and comfortable with the nature, importance, and handling of information in all of these and other fields. Further, they will understand the technology and the technological processes that enable the gathering, analysis, dissemination, and use of information to change the way business is done. The strategic focus of the School is to provide skills that will enable its graduates to be effective managers who are not only proficient in business procedures but have the leadership qualities and know-how to affect change by transforming conventional business practices or perhaps even inventing new business processes and management techniques.

The Graduate School of Management has created an information-rich environment that cuts across all business disciplines by providing its students, faculty, and staff with technological tools that enable each member of the School to retrieve and analyze information that can be used to develop new processes or solve complex problems. Five ITM laboratories in the core disciplines are a critical part of the learning experience, and students' familiarity and ease with Information Technology for Management serve as backdrop for many other courses.

Additionally, GSM has also achieved a national reputation for excellence in graduate management education in the health care industry through the Health Care Executive M.B.A. (HCEMBA) program. Industry managers and health care professionals learn about managerial challenges and issues in the health care industry where hundreds of health care providers, medical device and instrumentation companies, and biosciences firms are headquartered. A joint M.D./M.B.A. program also is available.

General Admission Requirements

Evaluation of the applicant's file for admission to the Master's and Ph.D. degree programs will consist of an integrated assessment of all materials (test scores, transcripts of previous academic work, statement of purpose, and letters of recommendation). The University admission standard of a 3.0 or better undergraduate grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) is required. The minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score acceptable for study at GSM is 600 for all M.B.A. programs. Substantive work experience is considered for applicants to M.B.A. programs.

Requests for application material should be addressed to either the Full-Time M.B.A., M.B.A. Programs for Working Professionals, or Ph.D. Program at the University of California, Irvine, Graduate School of Management, Irvine, CA 92697-3125; e-mail: gsm-mba@uci.edu, or gsm-phd@gsm.uci.edu; World Wide Web: http://www.gsm.uci.edu/.

Doctor of Philosophy in Management

GSM admits students for the Ph.D. in the fall quarter only. The deadline for application is January 4. The Ph.D. program requires a commitment to full-time study. In addition to the other requirements, Ph.D. applicants are encouraged to submit a previously prepared paper (research report, Master's thesis, essay, case study) which may be indicative generally of the applicant's interests and capabilities.

GSM offers the Ph.D. in Management to students with backgrounds in a variety of disciplines. While a master's degree is preferred, students may be admitted to the doctoral program directly from the baccalaureate degree. There are many appropriate undergraduate majors, including (but not limited to) psychology, political science, business or public administration, mathematics, computer sciences, economics, sociology, and so forth. Students with academic strengths in disciplines not usually considered as precursors for management (e.g., natural sciences, humanities, and the arts) are encouraged to apply. The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare students for academic careers in a number of the fields of management, e.g., organization and strategy, operations and decision technologies, management information systems, finance, accounting, and marketing. Requirements of the Ph.D. program include a broad knowledge of core management disciplines. In addition, the Ph.D. student must qualify as a skilled researcher and must complete a dissertation demonstrating these skills. There are no foreign language requirements in the GSM Ph.D. program.

The Ph.D. program is divided into two phases: qualification and dissertation. In the qualification phase the student prepares for dissertation research in an area of specialization. This phase is completed when an oral qualifying examination is passed and the candidacy committee recommends advancement to candidacy for the Ph.D. The normal time for advancement to candidacy is three years. The dissertation phase involves a significant original research project which demonstrates the Ph.D. student's creativity and ability to launch and sustain a career of research. Students are expected to complete the Ph.D. in four years. The maximum time permitted is six years.

Requests for information should be addressed to the University of California, Irvine, Graduate School of Management, Doctoral Program Admissions Office, 418 Graduate School of Management, Irvine, CA 92697-3125; e-mail: gsm-phd@ gsm.uci.edu; World Wide Web: http://www.gsm.uci.edu/doctoral/.

Master's Degree Programs

GSM offers a variety of programs leading to the M.B.A. (Master of Business Administration) degree. These include a two-year, full-time M.B.A. program, and three part-time M.B.A. programs: a 21-month Executive M.B.A. program, a two-year Health Care Executive M.B.A. program, and a three-year Fully Employed M.B.A. program. A five-year joint M.D./M.B.A. program is offered in conjunction with the College of Medicine.

M.B.A. PROGRAM

GSM admits students to the two-year, full-time M.B.A. program in the fall quarter. Students from a variety of undergraduate disciplines, including liberal arts, social sciences, physical or biological sciences, computer science, and engineering, are encouraged to apply. The final deadline for completion of all phases of the application procedure is May 14. In addition to the general University rules governing admission to graduate study, GSM normally requires the following:

1. Completion of the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).

2. Completion of a course in both introductory calculus and statistics with probability with a grade of B or better.

The evaluation of an applicant's file for admission consists of an integrated assessment of all materials submitted including test scores, transcripts of previous academic work, statements on application forms, and letters of recommendation. Above and beyond these factors, substantive work experience is given serious consideration in the evaluation process.

The full-time M.B.A. program requires a minimum of 92 units with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in the Core and overall. The curriculum consists of courses divided into two groups designed to achieve specific educational objectives. The courses are divided as follows: 13 required Common Core Courses (50 units) and 42 units of elective courses which students select to emphasize career goals and educational interests. A thesis is not required.

Required Course Work. Common Core Courses, each of which is four units, are: Management of Complex Organizations, Statistics for Management, Management Science, Operations Management, Organizational Analysis for Management, Financial and Managerial Accounting for Management, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics for Management or Government and Public Policy, Information Technology for Management, Marketing Management, Managerial Finance, Business Strategy.

International Requirement. Students must fulfill the international requirement in one of the following ways; completion of a GSM international elective in a functional area; participation in a GSM international exchange program; or completion of an upper-division or graduate international course offered by a University of California school, with the approval of the GSM Associate Dean.

ITM Electives. Students must complete 12 units of ITM course work, which can be fulfilled by successful completion of ITM-designated laboratory or non-laboratory electives. Non-laboratory electives (typically four-unit courses) are special topic courses (some numbered 294, others with specific numbers, such as 271 and 275). ITM laboratories are numbered 295A, B, C, D, E, G. Students may meet the ITM requirements by successfully completing any combination of the above special topic courses and discipline-based ITM laboratory electives totaling at least 12 units.

Electives. In addition to the ITM electives, 30 more units of elective courses are required. The major emphasis in the elective courses is to develop additional depth in a discipline or interdisciplinary area or specialized competence in the use of a particular set of technical tools and methods. Students select their electives in light of their educational and career goals and interests.

The 3-2 Program for Undergraduates

In addition to the full-time master's program for students who have already received a bachelor's degree, outstanding UCI undergraduate students may apply to enter a cooperative 3-2 Program with GSM and most other campus units. Acceptance into the 3-2 Program constitutes advanced admission to the graduate program. Such students complete their undergraduate major requirements by the end of their junior year. During their senior year, they take graduate courses in GSM. These courses are used to satisfy their undergraduate unit requirements, and at the same time apply toward their graduate degree. Successful completion of the requirements in the program normally leads to the bachelor's degree in the cooperating discipline after the fourth year, and the M.B.A. degree after the fifth year. Students should consult with their academic counselor in their major school early in their academic careers for further information about completing undergraduate requirements in three years. Students contemplating entering such a program should contact the Graduate School of Management prior to, or early in, the start of their junior year for the purpose of program consultation.

NOTE: With the exception of 3-2 students, no undergraduates will be enrolled in GSM graduate-level courses.

M.D./M.B.A. Degree Program

The M.D./M.B.A. program requires five or six years for completion. It is aimed at individuals who are exceptional in ability and motivation and who seek a career as physicians with major responsibility for administration and management in health care organizations and institutions. Students in this program pursue a combined curriculum for an M.D. degree from the College of Medicine and an M.B.A. degree from the Graduate School of Management.

Students must be currently enrolled in the M.D. program and in good academic standing in order to apply to the combined M.D./M.B.A. program. During their second or third year of medical school, interested students submit an application to the Graduate School of Management Admissions Committee, after review by the College of Medicine. Final acceptance to the program is granted by the Graduate School of Management, and M.B.A. course work begins following completion of the student's third year of medical school. Students should be aware that enrollment in the M.D. program does not guarantee acceptance into the M.B.A. program.

The MCAT, along with the completion of three years of medical school training in good standing and passage of USMLE Step I, currently serve as a waiver for the GMAT entrance examination usually required for application to the M.B.A. program. The total number of units required to graduate for each program separately are satisfied in the M.D./M.B.A. program. Contact the M.D./M.B.A. Advisor at (949) 824-5388 for more information.

Special Opportunities

Within the M.B.A. program, GSM created an underlying curriculum in Information Technology for Management that provides students with sophisticated, state-of-the-art knowledge and practical experience in this rapidly evolving arena. Students take the customary M.B.A. core courses, augmented by a set of ITM application courses in various functional areas. In addition, many of the electives are specialized courses that reflect the changing nature of organizational management. Representative electives are: Networks and Telecommunications, Management of Information Systems, Electronic Business, Strategic Information Systems, Database Marketing, Marketing on the Internet, and Change Management. Additional activities designed to supplement this innovative curriculum include seminars given by industry leaders and relevant internships.

In addition to the standard admissions criteria, the Admissions Committee is particularly interested in how prospective candidates envision the current role and future potential of information technology in business.

The Graduate School of Management offers course work in health care management within the M.B.A. program. The courses provide training not only in health care and related issues, but also expose students to professionals in the areas of management, finance, marketing, and strategic planning.

In today's interconnected global business world, it has become increasingly important for management students to learn to operate in an international environment. M.B.A. students in the full-time program can gain first-hand knowledge of the culture and management practices of other industrialized countries by participating in an academic exchange with universities located abroad. This experience, combined with GSM course work in international management, prepares students for the demands and complexities of the growing global economic environment. Currently, GSM has exchange relationships with the ESSEC Graduate School of Management, Cergy-Pontoise, France; Katholieke University, Leuven, Belgium; Budapest University of Economic Sciences (BUES), Budapest, Hungary; Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, Wirtschafts Universitat, Wien, Vienna, Austria; ITESM (The Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education), Monterrey, Mexico; Bocconi University, Milan, Italy; Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon, Hong Kong; National University of Singapore, Singapore; and Chinese European International Business School, Shanghai, China.

Opportunities for students to take part in ongoing research exist through the Center for Research on Information Technology and Organizations (CRITO), which was recently designated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as one of six industry-University Information Research Centers in the United States. CRITO is a consortium of corporations working together with faculty at UCI and elsewhere to better understand the evolving fabric of the information society and its implications for the design, use, and management of information and technology in various user environments. These environments range from the individual user's environment to work-groups, organizations, social communities, and society. The aim is to determine how organizations can more effectively use information and better design and manage new technology for improving organizational performance and society more generally.

CRITO faculty associates are recognized internationally for their excellence in the study of information technology as it applies to complex organizations. This tradition of excellence has been established by faculty from the Graduate School of Management, the School of Information and Computer Science, and the School of Social Sciences. These associates have collaborated since 1974 on theoretical and empirical research projects studying a broad array of questions about the relationship between information technology and organizational structure, society, political behavior, productivity, and performance. Research conducted through CRITO focuses on the management, use, and impact of information technology in the emerging global, competitive marketplace and the policy issues raised by such use. CRITO facilitates a match between the technical and organizational dimensions and between academic researchers and information technology professionals, and also assists organizations in exploiting the potential offered by information technology. CRITO's goals are to conduct theoretical and empirical research, bring multiple intellectual perspectives and methods to bear on interdisciplinary research, and facilitate the collaboration of faculty, students, and the professional community utilizing the expertise, facilities, and activities provided by CRITO. Qualified GSM students are encouraged to participate in the various CRITO research activities and to avail themselves of this unique opportunity to interact with scholars from allied disciplines and to study in-depth the effects of the information technology revolution.

M.B.A. Career Services

The M.B.A. Career Services Office, located within the School, was established to serve the unique placement needs of M.B.A. students and alumni. It has two main functions: (1) attracting a variety of organizations to interview and hire graduates and (2) counseling students in career opportunities and the techniques necessary to conduct effective job searches, not only for their first jobs but throughout their careers. The relatively small size of the M.B.A. program allows considerable interaction between the Career Services Office and students.

EXECUTIVE M.B.A. PROGRAM

The Executive M.B.A. (EMBA) program presents a challenging 21-month course of study specifically designed for working professionals and managers with a minimum of eight years of work experience. Students meet on alternate weekends (Friday and Saturday) at the Graduate School of Management. Class size allows students the opportunity to actively participate in class discussions and interact closely with their peers. Information technology is an integral part of the program.

The program offers an applications-oriented curriculum with an international focus designed to give the working professional contemporary management tools for successfully doing business on a national and international level. Students participate in an in-depth, week-long international seminar abroad. The added dimension of overseas study provides them with first-hand knowledge of the challenges inherent in doing business on a global scale, and brings them in direct contact with global markets.

Further information may be obtained by contacting the University of California, Irvine, M.B.A. Programs for Working Professionals, 202 Graduate School of Management, Irvine, CA 92697-3125; telephone (949) 824-4565; Web site: http://www.gsm.uci.edu/.

HEALTH CARE EXECUTIVE M.B.A. PROGRAM

The Health Care Executive M.B.A. program is a two-year program designed for professionals and managers with experience in the health care industry. Classes are held once a month on a Thursday evening beginning at 7 p.m. and continuing until noon on Sunday. In addition, there are three week-long residential courses which address specific issues and topics while developing team-building skills.

The curriculum is a carefully structured program that assures each student exposure to the full range of disciplines which are essential components of a management education. The core and elective courses are specifically customized for application to a health care professional's daily challenges. Distinguished speakers from the industry are an integral part of the program.

Further information may be obtained by contacting the University of California, Irvine, M.B.A. Programs for Working Professionals, 202 Graduate School of Management, Irvine, CA 92697-3125; telephone (949) 824-4565; Web site: http://www.gsm.uci.edu/.

FULLY EMPLOYED M.B.A. PROGRAM

The Fully Employed M.B.A. (FEMBA) program gives emerging managers an opportunity to earn an M.B.A. degree with minimal disruption to their professional lives. Students attend classes on weeknights and/or Saturdays during the program, which is typically completed in nine quarters.

The 92-unit program consists of both core courses and electives, allowing students to establish a solid foundation of traditional business skills and then customize their education based on personal interests and goals. The curriculum provides constant interaction between information presented in the classroom and what is being used on the job, reinforcing and enhancing the student's learning experience.

In addition to classroom work, students attend three residential sessions including one abroad focusing on global markets. In this concentrated setting, students and faculty have an opportunity to explore in depth a variety of business challenges and how those challenges can best be met using contemporary management tools.

Further information may be obtained by contacting the University of California, Irvine, M.B.A. Programs for Working Professionals, 202 Graduate School of Management, Irvine, CA 92697-3125; telephone (949) 824-4565; Web site: http://www.gsm.uci.edu/.

Undergraduate Minor in Management

The GSM faculty offer an undergraduate minor in Management which consists of seven courses: one lower-division introductory course and six upper-division courses.

In establishing the GSM undergraduate minor in Management, the faculty anticipated three types of students to be drawn to courses in administration: (1) students who wish to learn about the management of organizations as a way of preparing for a career in business, (2) students preparing for careers in other fields that require some knowledge of management, and (3) students who expect to go on to graduate work in management who wish early guidance and undergraduate work appropriate to this career objective.

Students are eligible to apply for the minor in Management if they have completed all prerequisite courses (including Management 5) with a grade no lower than C (2.0) and have upper-division standing. Completion of the prerequisite courses does not guarantee admission to the minor in Management. Admission is on a competitive basis and students must submit an application, transcripts, and a statement of purpose. Applications are accepted on a quarterly basis. Interested students are encouraged to obtain further information from the GSM Undergraduate Program Office, 101 Multipurpose Academic and Administrative Building; World Wide Web: http://www.gsm.uci.edu/.

Prerequisite Courses

The following are prerequisites for enrolling in the upper-division undergraduate minor courses: Management 5; Economics 20A; and one course or one sequence selected from Anthropology 10A-B-C, Engineering CEE11, Economics 10A-B-C, Mathematics 7, Mathematics 131A-B-C, Psychology 10A-B-C, Social Ecology 13, Social Ecology 166A-B-C, Social Science 9A-B-C or 10A-B-C, or Sociology 10A-B-C.

Transfer students should check with their college counselor for established equivalencies for these prerequisite courses.

NOTE: Individual courses that students may select within the minor may require additional prerequisites, including Mathematics 2A.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Minor in Management

Completion of seven courses:

A. One lower-division core course: Management 5.

B. Four upper-division core courses selected from: Management 181, 183, 185, 186, 187, 188.

C. Two additional courses selected from: the upper-division core course list above, Management 160, and Management 190.

With GSM faculty approval, a student may substitute a maximum of one course. Students participating in the UC Education Abroad Program may substitute a maximum of two courses, with GSM faculty approval.

NOTE: Students may not receive both the minor in Management and the minor in Accounting.

Undergraduate Minor in Accounting

The GSM faculty offers an undergraduate minor in Accounting consisting of seven upper-division courses. In addition, two lower-division introductory accounting courses, one lower-division microeconomics course, and one lower-division single variable calculus course are prerequisites to the minor program.

In establishing the GSM undergraduate minor in Accounting, the faculty anticipated three types of students to be drawn to courses in accounting: (1) students who wish to meet the accounting course work eligibility requirements to sit for the uniform CPA examination, (2) students preparing for careers in private accounting or in other fields that require some knowledge of accounting, and (3) students planning to pursue a graduate degree in accounting who wish early guidance and undergraduate work appropriate to this career objective.

Students are eligible to apply for the minor in Accounting if they have upper-division standing and have completed Management 30A and 30B with a grade no lower than B (3.0) and all other prerequisite courses with a grade no lower than C (2.0). Completion of the prerequisite courses does not guarantee admission to the minor in Accounting. Admission is on a competitive basis and students must submit an application, transcripts, and a statement of purpose. Applications are accepted on a quarterly basis. Interested students are encouraged to obtain further information from the GSM Undergraduate Program Office, 101 Multipurpose Academic and Administrative Building; Web site: http://www.gsm.uci.edu.

Prerequisite Courses

The following are prerequisites for enrolling in the upper-division undergraduate minor courses: Economics 20A, Mathematics 2A, Management 30A, and Management 30B.

Transfer students should check with their college counselor for established equivalencies for these prerequisite courses. Students not taking Management 30A and 30B at UCI during regular session or summer session must complete Management 131A with a minimum grade of B prior to admission in the program.

NOTE: Individual courses that students may select within the minor may require additional prerequisites.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Minor in Accounting

Completion of seven upper-division courses:

A. Three core accounting courses: Management 131A, 131B, 132.

B. Two accounting elective courses selected from: Management 133, 134, 136, 137, 138.

C. Two additional courses selected from: the upper-division accounting elective course list above, Management 139, 160, 181, 183, 186, 187, 188, and 190 (provided topics have not been covered in other accounting courses).

With GSM faculty approval, a student may substitute a maximum of one minor course.

NOTE: Students may not receive both the minor in Accounting and the minor in Management.


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