SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

Barbara A. Dosher, Dean

Social Science Plaza

Undergraduate Counseling: (949) 824-6803

Graduate Counseling: (949) 824-5924

World Wide Web: http://www.socsci.uci.edu/

School Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree

Graduate Programs

Department of Anthropology

Department of Cognitive Sciences

Department of Economics

Geography

Undergraduate Major in International Studies

Department of Linguistics

Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Department of Political Science

Undergraduate Major in Social Science

Department of Sociology

Graduate Program in Social Science

Faculty

Dennis J. Aigner, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Management and Economics

Gian Aldo Antonelli, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Marigee Bacolod, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Economics

Nina Bandelj, Ph.D. Princeton University, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Jeffrey A. Barrett, Ph.D. Columbia University, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

William H. Batchelder, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Frank D. Bean, Ph.D. Duke University, Professor of Sociology

Matthew N. Beckmann, M.A. University of Michigan, Acting Assistant Professor of Political Science

Duran Bell, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Economics and Anthropology

Bruce Berg, Ph.D. Indiana University, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Victoria Bernal, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Associate Professor of Anthropology

Marlon G. Boarnet, Ph.D. Princeton University, Chair of the Department of Planning, Policy, and Design and Associate Professor of Social Ecology and Economics

Tom Boellstorff, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Dan Bogart, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Economics

John P. Boyd, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor Emeritus of Mathematical Anthropology

Myron L. Braunstein, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Scott D. Brown, B.S. University of Newcastle, Assistant Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Susan K. Brown, Ph.D. University of Washington, Assistant Professor of Sociology

David Brownstone, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Economics

Alison Brysk, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Political Science

Thomas C. Buchmueller, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison, Associate Professor of Management, Economics, and Social Ecology

Michael L. Burton, Ph.D. Stanford University, Director of International Studies, Department Chair and Professor of Anthropology, and Professor of Social Ecology

Michael Butler, J.F., Society of Fellows, Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences

Carter Butts, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Robert W. Byde, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer in Cognitive Sciences

Kitty C. Calavita, Ph.D. University of Delaware, Professor of Social Ecology and Sociology

Teresa Caldeira, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Anthropology

Francesca M. Cancian, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of Sociology

Frank Cancian, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology

Leo R. Chávez, Ph.D. Stanford University, Director of Chicano/Latino Studies and Professor of Anthropology

Kenneth S. Chew, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Social Ecology and Sociology (social demography, epidemiology and public health)

Charles F. Chubb, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Carol M. Cicerone, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate of the Chancellor and Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Linda Cohen, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Professor of Economics

Philip Cohen, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Benjamin N. Colby, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology

Thomas N. Cornsweet, Ph.D. Brown University, Professor Emeritus of Cognitive Sciences

Michel Crozier, Docteur en Droit, University of Paris and University of Lille, and Docteur d'Etat, University of Paris, Professor of Political Science

Russell Dalton, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Director of the Center for the Study of Democracy and Professor of Political Science

James N. Danziger, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Political Science

William Demopolous, Ph.D. University of Western Ontario, Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Louis DeSipio, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Associate Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies and Political Science

Arthur S. DeVany, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Economics

John D. Dombrink, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Social Ecology and Sociology

Barbara A. Dosher, Ph.D. University of Oregon, Dean of the School of Social Sciences and Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Michael D'Zmura, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Professor of Cognitive Sciences

David Easton, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Distinguished Research Professor of Political Science

Jean-Claude Falmagne, Ph.D. University of Brussels, Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Katherine Faust, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor of Sociology

Martha Feldman, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Social Ecology, Management, Sociology, and Political Science, and Roger W. and Janice M. Johnson Chair in Civic Governance and Public Management

Paul J. Feldstein, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Management, Economics, and Social Ecology, and Robert Gumbiner Chair in Health Care Management

Cynthia Feliciano, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies and Sociology

Raúl Fernández, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate School, Professor of Social Sciences

Gordon J. Fielding, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences

James J. Flink, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences

David John Frank, Ph.D. Stanford University, Associate Professor of Sociology

Linton Freeman, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Research Professor of Sociology

Creel Froman, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science

Paula Garb, Ph.D. U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences, Associate Adjunct Professor of Anthropology

Lisa García Bedolla, Ph.D. Yale University, Assistant Professor of Chicano/ Latino Studies and Political Science

Robert Garfias, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Anthropology

Michelle Garfinkel, Ph.D. Brown University, Professor of Economics

Amihai Glazer, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Economics

Gilbert Gonzalez, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Social Sciences

Richard H. Granger, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Computer Science and Cognitive Sciences

Susan Greenhalgh, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Anthropology

Bernard N. Grofman, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Political Science and Economics

Frank Haight, Ph.D. University of New Zealand, Adjunct Professor of Economics

Gregory Hickok, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Donald Hoffman, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Cognitive Sciences and Philosophy

Lawrence A. Howard, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer in Cognitive Sciences

Matthew L. Huffman Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Tarow Indow, Ph.D. Keio University, Professor Emeritus of Cognitive Sciences

Helen Ingram, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Social Ecology and Political Science, and Drew, Chace, and Erin Warmington Chair in the Social Ecology of Peace and International Cooperation

Jun Ishii, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Economics

Geoffrey J. Iverson, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Mireille Jacobson, Ph.D. Harvard University, Assistant Professor of Social Ecology and Economics

Ivan Jeliazkov, Ph.D. Washington University in St. Louis, Assistant Professor of Economics

Valerie Jenness, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Chair of the Department of Criminology, Law and Society and Associate Professor of Social Ecology and Sociology

Kent E. Johnson, Ph.D. Rutgers University, Assistant Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Joseph G. Jorgensen, Ph.D. Indiana University, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences

Philippe Jorion, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Management and Economics

Marek Kaminski, Ph.D. University of Maryland, Assistant Professor of Political Science

Sheen T. Kassouf, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emeritus of Economics

Mary-Louise Kean, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Cognitive Sciences and Linguistics

George Kent, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences

Claire Jean Kim, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies and Political Science

Jerome Kirk, Ph.D. The Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emeritus of Sociology

Igor Kopylov, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Assistant Professor of Economics

David LaBerge, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Cognitive Sciences

Charles Lave, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Economics

Jennifer Lee, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of Sociology

Karen Leonard, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Professor of Anthropology

John M. Liu, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Social Sciences and Asian American Studies

Christine Lofgren, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Director of the Farm School and Lecturer in Cognitive Sciences

Elizabeth F. Loftus, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, Criminology, Law and Society, and Cognitive Sciences

R. Duncan Luce, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Cognitive Sciences and Economics

Cecelia Lynch, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of Political Science

Gary S. Lynch, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and of Cognitive Sciences

Craig MacAndrew, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor Emeritus of Psychology

Penelope Maddy, Ph.D. Princeton University, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science and of Mathematics

David B. Malament, Ph.D. Rockefeller University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Virginia Mann, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, School of Social Sciences, and Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Julius Margolis, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Economics

Richard Matthew, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of Social Ecology and Political Science

William M. Maurer, Ph.D. Stanford University, Associate Professor of Anthropology

Robert May, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Michael McBride, Ph.D. Yale University, Assistant Professor of Economics

Anthony McGann, Ph.D. Duke University, Assistant Professor of Political Science

James L. McGaugh, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Research Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior and of Cognitive Sciences

Martin C. McGuire, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of Economics and Management, and Clifford and Elaine Heinz Chair in the Economics and Public Policy of Peace

Richard B. McKenzie, Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Professor of Management and Economics, and Walter B. Gerken Chair in Enterprise and Society

Marshall Medoff, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Lecturer in Economics

James W. Meeker, Ph.D., J.D. State University of New York, Buffalo, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, School of Social Ecology, and Professor of Social Ecology and Sociology

Duane Metzger, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology

David S. Meyer, Ph.D. Boston University, Associate Professor of Sociology

Kristen R. Monroe, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Political Science

Patrick Morgan, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Political Science and Thomas T. and Elizabeth C. Tierney Chair in Peace Studies

Calvin Morrill, Ph.D. Harvard University, Department Chair and Professor of Sociology and Professor of Social Ecology

Louis Narens, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Robert Newcomb, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment, Social Sciences

Nicholas R. Noviello, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer in Social Sciences

Michael J. Pazzani, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Informatics, Computer Science, and Cognitive Sciences

Jack W. Peltason, Ph.D. Princeton University, President Emeritus of the University of California, UCI Chancellor Emeritus, and Professor Emeritus of Political Science

Mark P. Petracca, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Political Science and Social Ecology

Joy Pixley, Ph.D. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Dale Poirier, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison, Professor of Economics

Henry N. Pontell, Ph.D. State University of New York, Stony Brook, Professor of Social Ecology and Sociology

M. Ross Quillian, Ph.D. Carnegie-Mellon University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science

Priya Ranjan, Ph.D. Columbia University, Assistant Professor of Economics

Jen'nan Read, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Gary Richardson, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Economics

Belinda Robnett, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Sociology

A. Kimball Romney, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology

Shawn Rosenberg, M. Litt. University of Oxford, Professor of Political Science and Social Psychology

Michael D. Rugg, Ph.D. University of Leicester, Director of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, and Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior and of Cognitive Sciences

Rubén G. Rumbaut, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Professor of Sociology

Donald G. Saari, Ph.D. Purdue University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Economics and Mathematics

Kourosh Saberi, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Kamal Sadiq, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Assistant Professor of Political Science

Wayne Sandholtz, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Director of Global Peace and Conflict Studies and Professor of Political Science

Jean-Daniel M. Saphores, Ph.D. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Social Ecology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Economics

Michael J. Scavio, Ph.D. University of Iowa, Lecturer in Cognitive Sciences and Social Sciences

William R. Schonfeld, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Political Science

Tonya L. Schuster, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Lecturer in Sociology

Sarah Senesky, Ph.D. Yale University, Assistant Professor of Economics

Caesar D. Sereseres, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, School of Social Sciences, and Associate Professor of Political Science

William Rodman Shankle, M.D. Brown University Medical School, Associate Adjunct Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Paul Shirey, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer in Economics and Social Sciences

Stergios Skaperdas, Ph.D. The Johns Hopkins University, Professor of Economics

Brian Skyrms, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, Director of the Minor in the History and Philosophy of Science and UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science and of Economics

Kenneth A. Small, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Economics and of Planning, Policy, and Design

David A. Smith, Ph.D. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Professor of Sociology and Social Ecology

David A. Snow, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Sociology

Etel Solingen, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Political Science

Dorothy Solinger, Ph.D. Stanford University, Co-Director of the Minor in Asian Studies and Professor of Political Science

George Sperling, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Sciences and of Neurobiology and Behavior

Ramesh Srinivasan, Ph.D. Tulane University, Assistant Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Preston Kyle Stanford, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Arnold Starr, M.D. New York University, Research Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Cognitive Sciences, and Neurobiology and Behavior

Judith Stepan-Norris, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Sociology

Mark Steyvers, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Yang Su, M.A. The Catholic University of America, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Kaushik Sunder Rajan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Assistant Professor of Anthropology

James M. Swanson, Ph.D. The Ohio State University, Chief of the Child Development Center and Professor of Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Human Behavior, and Cognitive Sciences

Rein Taagepera, Ph.D. University of Delaware, Professor Emeritus of Political Science

Katherine Tate, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Department Chair and Professor of Political Science

Gary Thom, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science

Justin L. Tobias, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Assistant Professor of Economics

Rodolfo D. Torres, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate School, Associate Professor of Education, Social Ecology, and Political Science

Bernard Tranel, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Linguistics

Judith Treas, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Sociology

Carole J. Uhlaner, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Political Science

Robert Uriu, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of Political Science

Kurt Van Dender, Ph.D. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium), Assistant Professor of Economics

Deborah R. Vargas, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, Assistant Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies and Sociology

Sheila Vaughn, Ph.D. United States International University, Lecturer in Cognitive Sciences

Wang Feng, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Sociology

W. C. Watt, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor Emeritus of Cognitive Sciences

Martin P. Wattenberg, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Political Science

Kai F. Wehmeier, Ph.D. Westfalische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Assistant Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Norman Weinberger, Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior and of Cognitive Sciences

Christian Werner, Ph.D. The Free University of Berlin, Professor Emeritus of Economics

Douglas R. White, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Professor of Anthropology

Joseph L. White, Ph.D. Michigan State University, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences

R. Bin Wong, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Chancellor's Professor of History, Economics, and East Asian Languages and Literatures

Charles E. (Ted) Wright, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Valerie Wright, Ph.D. Fuller Theological Seminary, Lecturer in Cognitive Sciences and Social Sciences

John I. Yellott, Jr., Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Cognitive Sciences

Fan-Gang (Frank) Zeng, Ph.D. Syracuse University, Director of the Hearing and Speech Laboratory and Associate Professor of Otolaryngology, Biomedical Engineering, Cognitive Sciences, and Anatomy and Neurobiology

Mei Zhan, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Anthropology

OVERVIEW

Undergraduate and graduate education in the School of Social Sciences at UCI represents a commitment to modern social science. The classic subject areas of anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, political science, psychology, and sociology are included in the School's educational programs, but these programs go well beyond the traditional disciplines and can be characterized by the following emphases.

First, the faculty recognizes the value of systematic empirical observation and quantitative analysis in the study of human behavior. Developments in computer science and in mathematics oriented toward the problems of the social sciences, and the refinement of techniques for the observational, experimental, and statistical study of human behavior, have contributed major new elements to social science. Students in the School of Social Sciences will become familiar with the mathematical, computational, and statistical tools underlying modern social science.

Second, many of the most interesting questions in the study of human behavior cannot be fixed within the traditional disciplinary boundaries. Some of the new and evolving areas which cross orthodox boundaries are political sociology, public policy, cognitive anthropology, and psycholinguistics. Therefore many courses and course modules are built around these interdisciplinary social science phenomena rather than representing social science disciplines.

Third, the School emphasizes the design of hypotheses and of systems of interrelated ideas as an essential part of scientific pursuit. Consequently, the educational programs place substantial emphasis on understanding social science phenomena through the development of theories that can be used to guide empirical studies.

Educational opportunities for students in the School of Social Sciences extend well beyond attendance at courses. Students may develop independent study proposals in cooperation with interested faculty members or may investigate social science applications via off-campus internships. They are invited to participate in the quarterly evaluation of courses and instructors, to propose new courses and other modifications in existing programs, to nominate candidates for visiting faculty appointments, and to serve on School committees. The School provides a variety of opportunities for faculty-student interaction, and students will find the faculty, administration, and academic counseling staff of the School highly accessible and responsive.

Special Facilities

The School of Social Sciences maintains several special facilities for research and education.

The Social Sciences Research Laboratory, used for both faculty and student research, occupies the entire fourth floor of the Social Sciences Laboratory Building. The facility contains 40 experiment and control rooms and several specialized facilities including a virtual reality facility and infant cognition laboratory.

The Farm School, a small, open, and ungraded elementary school located in a rural setting adjacent to the campus, serves as a research facility for faculty and students having interests in children and how they learn. Undergraduates receive course credit for assisting staff teachers, for developing educational materials, and for observing and analyzing child behavior at the school.

Three Computer Laboratories provide access to networked IBM-compatible systems, where students can work on assignments using full-featured word-processing, database, graphics, and statistical packages. In addition, these computers provide students with access to e-mail, Internet services, and the World Wide Web. The new Social Science Plaza facility contains state-of-the-art, high-tech lecture halls and is fully Internet accessible.

The Social Sciences Academic Resource Center (SSARC) provides personal assistance to all Social Sciences students on finding research opportunities, off-campus internships, and graduate and professional programs. The Center maintains a library of graduate school catalogues, Statement of Purpose tips and handouts, and GRE, GMAT, LSAT, and CBEST registration booklets and test preparation information. In addition, it offers a database of community and professional internships for students to attain hands-on experience in their field of study. SSARC is fully staffed and provides Internet access to students, disseminates information on scholarships, and conducts workshops on graduate school and other related post-baccalaureate opportunities. A Recommendation Coordination Service for obtaining letters of recommendation is available to School majors. The service provides assistance for students applying to graduate and professional programs.

The Center for Global Peace and Conflict Studies (CGPACS) is a multidisciplinary research unit housed in the School of Social Sciences. The mission of CGPACS is to promote research on international problems and processes. The Center's current research emphases include: weapons of mass destruction, especially biological weapons; international governance, focusing on the evolution of international norms and institutions; citizen peace building; international environmental cooperation; and religion in international affairs. CGPACS also sponsors research conferences and public colloquia on topics of current significance. The Center's Margolis Lecture brings to UCI high-profile speakers who have played active roles in international affairs. Recent Margolis Lectures have featured Justice Louise Arbour, former chief prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunals; Chinese democracy activist Wei Jinsheng; Congressman Christopher Cox; former Secretary of State Warren Christopher; and former Secretary of Defense William Perry. For more information about CGPACS visit the Web site at http://hypatia.ss.uci.edu/gpacs.

The Center for the Study of Democracy (CSD) continues the work of the UCI Focused Research Program on Democratization that was founded in 1991 and sponsors research and training on the process of democratic transition and the expansion of the democratic process in already established democracies. CSD includes a multidisciplinary faculty from four UC campuses.

CSD's activities are focused on three areas. First, faculty administer a graduate training program on empirical democratic theory. The National Science Foundation selected UCI in 1995 as a national center for the training of doctoral students in democratization issues; the five-year NSF grant provides funding for graduate fellowships and other training activities.

Second, the Democracy research program aims at improving the democratic process in the United States and other established democracies as we enter the next century. The program focuses on reforms to increase the ability of citizens to express their preferences and have these preferences represented within the democratic process.

Third, CSD supports research on the development of sustainable democracies in Eastern Europe, East Asia, and other new democracies. The New Democracies Initiative contributes to the promotion of democracy in these formerly authoritarian systems. For more information visit the Center for the Study of Democracy's Web site at http://www.democ.uci.edu/democ.

Visiting Distinguished Professorships

The School sponsors a program of Visiting Distinguished Professorships that exposes students to seminal thinkers in the social sciences. The professorships normally are of a quarter's duration. Participants have included Martin Bronfenbrenner, Professor of Economics (Duke University) and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Philip Converse, Robert C. Angell Professor of Political Sciences and Sociology (University of Michigan), President of the American Political Science Association, and member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Beatrice Whiting, Professor of Anthropology and Education Emeritus, Graduate School of Education (Harvard University), and member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; John Whiting, Professor of Social Anthropology (Harvard University) and member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; James Coleman, Professor of Sociology (University of Chicago) and member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and Robin M. Williams, Department of Sociology (Cornell University) and member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Degrees

Anthropology B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Economics B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Geography 1 B.A.

International Studies B.A.

Linguistics 2 B.A.

Philosophy 3 M.A., Ph.D.

Political Science B.A., Ph.D.

Psychology B.A., Ph.D.

Social Science B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Sociology B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Transportation Science 4 M.S., Ph.D.

Within the Ph.D. in Social Science is an optional concentration in Mathematical Behavioral Sciences, supervised by an interdisciplinary group of faculty.

Within the M.A. in Social Science, students may apply directly to the concentration in Demographic and Social Analysis; for those enrolled in a Ph.D. program at another institution, the M.A. concentration in Mathematical Behavioral Sciences is available.


1 The major of Geography is not available at this time; however, courses in Geography are offered under Social Science.

2 The availability of this degree is currently under review. Contact the Associate Dean of Social Sciences for details.

3 Jointly administered by the Department of Philosophy in the School of Humanities.

4 Supervised by the Interdepartmental Group in Transportation Science. See the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

HONORS

Graduation with Honors. Of the graduating seniors, no more than 12 percent will receive honors: approximately 1 percent summa cum laude, 3 percent magna cum laude, and 8 percent cum laude. The selection for these awards is based on winter quarter rank-ordered grade point averages. To be eligible for honors at graduation, the student must, by the end of winter quarter of the senior year, have submitted an Application for Graduation; be officially declared a Social Sciences major; have completed at least 72 units while in residence at a UC campus by the end of the winter quarter of the academic year in which they graduate; have all corrections to the academic record processed by the Registrar's Office; if completing the Language Other Than English breadth requirement with a language exemption test, pass the test by the end of winter quarter; and be able to verify completion of all course work by the end of the spring quarter of the senior year. Other factors are also considered (see page 53).

Dean's Honor List. The quarterly Dean's Honor List is composed of students who have received a 3.5 grade point average while carrying a minimum of 12 graded units.

Departmental Honors Programs. Most departments in the School of Social Sciences offer an Honors Program (refer to the departmental information). Upon successful completion of the Honors Program, students graduate with Honors in their respective majors and their transcripts note that they were in the Honors Program.

Honor Societies. Several departments in the School of Social Sciences belong to a national honor society. Eligibility is based on satisfying the requirements of the specific honor society. In the School of Social Sciences, these national honor societies include: Lambda Alpha Kappa (Anthropology), Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics), Pi Omicron of Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science), Psi Chi (Psychology), Pi Gamma Mu (International Studies and Social Science), and Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology).

Order of Merit. The Dean of the School of Social Sciences' Order of Merit award recognizes the most outstanding graduating undergraduates and graduate students for their academic achievements, contributions to the School, and service to the campus and community.

David Easton Award. This award is given for the outstanding qualifying paper written by a Political Science graduate student during the preceding academic year.

Harry Eckstein Award for the Outstanding Undergraduate Honors Thesis. This award is given annually for the best honors thesis written by a Political Science major.

Harry Eckstein Memorial Fund. The Harry Eckstein Memorial Fund is presented annually to Political Science graduate students conducting research toward the completion of the Ph.D. in Political Science at UCI. Recipients of the award are designated as Eckstein Scholars.

The Justine Lambert Prize in Foundations of Science. This award is given every other year to the best submitted graduate paper on the foundations of logic, mathematics, and the empirical sciences. The competition is open to all graduate students at UCI, regardless of department or school affiliation.

Alice B. Macy Outstanding Undergraduate Paper Award. This award is given to a Social Sciences undergraduate student in any discipline for a paper that demonstrates original research.

Jack and Suzie Peltason Scholarship. This award is given at the discretion of the department chair to support and facilitate the education of undergraduate Political Science majors. All undergraduate Political Science majors are eligible to apply.

Pi Omicron Award for Outstanding Political Science Major. This award is given annually by UCI's Pi Omicron Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha to a graduating senior Political Science major who best exemplifies a commitment to academic excellence and public service.

A. Kimball Romney Outstanding Graduate Paper Award. This award is given to a Social Sciences graduate student in any discipline for a paper that demonstrates original research.

Robin M. Williams Award. This award is given to an undergraduate student and a graduate student for the best research paper in the field of sociology.

Undergraduate Program

PLANNING A PROGRAM OF STUDY

Since there are many alternative ways to plan a program, some of which may require careful attention to specific major requirements, students should consult with the School of Social Sciences Undergraduate Counseling Office to design an appropriate program of study.

Students who select one of the School majors in their freshman year might begin by taking the one-digit courses required by their major and one of the mathematics sequences listed under Part A of the School requirements. It is a good idea to take these courses early since they include fundamental concepts that will be widely applicable in more advanced courses. In addition, the lower-division writing requirement of the breadth requirement (Category I) should be completed during the first year. In the sophomore year, the student might complete the course on computing, three courses toward the breadth requirement, four courses in the social sciences, and four electives. Students who are planning to go on to graduate school can use their freshman and sophomore years to advantage by taking courses in theory, research methods, mathematics, and other areas important to graduate study. In the junior and senior years, the student should take courses in the major area and should create an individualized program of study through a combination of courses and course modules which fall in an area of interest. Particular attention should be paid to planning a program of study that will ensure that major requirements are met prior to graduation.

Change of Major. Students who wish to change their major to one offered by the school should contact the Social Sciences Undergraduate Counseling Office for information about change-of-major requirements, procedures, and policies. Information is also available at http://www.due.uci.edu/Change_of_Major.html.

Double Majors

In order to double major within the School of Social Sciences, major and school requirements must be met for both majors with no overlap of courses except for those used to satisfy the mathematics, computer technology, and introductory social science requirements. The mathematics and computer courses need only be taken once. Only two introductory social science classes are needed, provided this also meets the requirements of both major programs. The same two-digit and upper-division courses may not be used to meet the requirements of more than one major program. For example, a student who wishes to major in Psychology and Anthropology may take one of the mathematics sequences, Information and Computer Science 10A, 10B, or 21, or Social Science 3A, and may use Introduction to Psychology and Introduction to Anthropology to meet the major and School requirements for both programs. However, two different sets of two-digit and upper-division courses must be taken to complete the major and School requirements of the two programs.

Mathematics and Social Sciences

The mathematics requirement stems from the nature of modern social science. The concepts and terms of mathematics, statistics, and computers are an important part of the social scientist's vocabulary. Basic knowledge of these tools is necessary to an understanding of current literature in the social sciences, to the analysis of data, and to an intelligent use of social science models. Each candidate for a degree in the School of Social Sciences is expected to have a basic knowledge of probability, statistics, and computing. In addition, for students who are preparing for graduate school in an area of social science, it will be important to supplement the minimal mathematics requirements with additional courses related to mathematics and social science methodology. The particular courses which would be recommended are not specified here, however, since they are highly dependent on the major emphasis of the student. Students who are preparing for graduate study should consult their advisors to determine a program of study which will give them the research skills necessary for successful graduate work.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE

University Requirements: See pages 56-61.

School Requirements

A. Familiarity with basic mathematical, computational, and statistical tools underlying modern social sciences. This requirement is met by passing a three-course sequence in mathematics (Anthropology 10A-B-C, Economics 10A-B, 30, Mathematics 2A-B, 7, Psychology 10A-B-C, Social Science 10A-B-C, Social Science 100A-B-C, or Sociology 10A-B-C). (NOTE: School of Social Sciences majors may not take Social Science 9A-B-C to fulfill the mathematics requirement.) Computer education is essential for a complete social science education. This requirement can be satisfied by passing Information and Computer Science 10A, 10B, or 21, or Social Science 3A. Departments may have preferences for specific courses. See your major department for acceptable courses. This course requirement should be taken during the student's first year.

B. An understanding of the fundamental concepts, analytical tools, and methods of social science. This requirement is met by taking two four-unit introductory courses in the School of Social Sciences bearing a one-digit course number. (Such courses include Anthropology 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D; Economics 1; Linguistics 3; Logic and Philosophy of Science 4A, 4B; Political Science 6A, 6B, 6C; Psychology 7; Social Science 1A, 2A, 5A, 5B, 5C, 5D; Sociology 1.) These courses normally should be taken during the student's first year.

C. An understanding of important advanced areas in social science. This requirement is met by passing satisfactorily nine four-unit upper-division courses in the School of Social Sciences, where at least three of these courses comprise core courses or a module. For modules which are listed with more than three courses, the student may normally elect to take any subset of three courses in the module. Appropriate substitutions may be made upon petition.

D. Four additional four-unit social science courses from any level.

Students are reminded that the Pass/Not Pass option is not applicable to course requirements A through D above or to any additional requirements listed for specific major programs. However, Information and Computer Science 10A, 10B, 21, and Social Science 100A are exceptions to this rule and may be taken Pass/Not Pass.

Courses used to meet requirements B through D above are included in the computation of the grade point average in courses required in the major program.

Maximum Overlap Between Major and Minor Requirements: Students completing both a major and a minor within the School of Social Sciences may count courses taken to fulfill the School's mathematics and computer science requirement toward satisfaction of both the major and the minor. No other course overlap is allowed.

TRANSFER STUDY RECOMMENDATIONS

The School recommends that students wishing to transfer to UCI do the following:

1. Complete the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) prior to transfer to UCI.

2. Refer to http://www.assist.org/ for information about community college courses that will fulfill UCI lower-division major requirements.

Specific course recommendations:

Prospective Economics majors: complete a second semester of calculus (in addition to the courses required for transfer-student admission; see the Department of Economics section).

Prospective International Studies majors: complete two semesters of foreign language at the intermediate level.

Prospective Psychology majors: complete a three-course sequence in introductory, physiological, and either social or abnormal psychology.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Freshmen and Sophomores: Students transferring to UCI as freshmen or sophomores will fulfill the regular requirements of the four-year program either through work at UCI or through transfer credit for comparable work elsewhere.

Juniors: Following review by the School of Social Sciences, it may be determined that junior transfer students electing to major in one of the School's degree programs, who have good records at other accredited colleges and universities, have satisfied School requirement B and the University requirements. However, all transfer students must fulfill the upper-division writing breadth requirement (category I) while at UCI. Students anticipating transfer to UCI in their junior year should plan their curriculum so as to anticipate the special mathematics requirement (School requirement A). Every effort will be made to accommodate individual variation in background, provided students are prepared to commit themselves to intensive work in areas of deficiency. Ordinarily, the typical two-year program for junior transfers is simply the last two years of the regular four-year program, except that students who have not satisfied the mathematics requirements of the School should plan to do so in the junior year and must do so before graduation.

Seniors: Students wishing to graduate with a degree in the School by transferring to UCI in their senior year should plan their work carefully to ensure that the requirements can be met in one year of residence. In general, differences between the program at UCI and programs elsewhere make senior transfers difficult.

SERVICE LEARNING, COMMUNITY SERVICE, AND INTERNSHIPS

Service learning is a meaningful activity that integrates service within the curriculum. It is an opportunity for students to make positive contributions to underserved and marginalized communities through academic courses, field studies, and internships. Service learning provides out-of-class experiences to reinforce understanding of academic theory while addressing serious community concerns. When combined with a structured curriculum having research components, students can explore the role of the social scientist and help seek solutions to problems affecting society. The School of Social Sciences' philosophy is to practice research, service, and good citizenship.

The School actively supports service learning through its philosophy of enhancing the learning process by motivating, inspiring, and teaching students how to recognize and accept their civic responsibilities. The goal is to educate students about social issues and provide them with the necessary tools to solve the difficult problems society faces. Under the guidance and supervision of faculty and staff, students are offered the opportunity to experience personal, professional, social, and intellectual growth through the following School of Social Sciences programs: public- and private-sector internships, community service, field studies, and the specialization in Public and Community Service within the major in Social Science.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS IN K-12 EDUCATION

Undergraduate students who wish to pursue a career in the field of K-12 education are well-served in the School of Social Sciences and the Department of Education. The following interrelated programs provide opportunities for students to gain knowledge and experience in this important area.

Minor in Educational Studies

The minor in Educational Studies allows students to explore a broad range of issues in the field of education and provides a strong foundation for K-12 teaching. Both introductory and advanced courses are included, giving students a solid preparation for later teacher credential programs and many related occupations. NOTE: A Statement of Intent is required of all students wishing to enroll in this minor. See the Department of Education section of the Catalogue for more information.

Multiple Subject and Single Subject (Social Science) Preparation

Course work in the Social Science major (Social Sciences for Secondary School Education specialization) provides excellent preparation for students wishing to obtain a multiple subject teaching credential. Students who take additional course work can satisfy the subject matter requirement for a single subject teaching credential in social science. NOTE: Official enrollment in the single subject program is required to satisfy this requirement. The Counseling Office in 370D Social Science Tower can provide details.

Department of Education Programs

The Department of Education provides many other opportunities for prospective educators, including: a mentoring program which provides students with valuable experience while they work with credentialed teachers; UC Links, a program in which undergraduates tutor K-8 students in after-school settings; and advising services provided by counselors who assist students in planning future careers in education. Further information about these programs is available from the Department of Education counselors at 2001 Berkeley Place.

Students interested in obtaining a teaching credential should see the Department of Education section of the Catalogue for information.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

3-2 Program with the Graduate School of Management

Outstanding students who are interested in a career in management may wish to apply for entry into the Graduate School of Management's 3-2 Program. Students normally apply for this program early in their junior year. See the Graduate School of Management section for additional information.

Campuswide Honors Program

The Campuswide Honors Program is available to selected high-achieving students from all academic majors from their freshman through senior years. For more information contact the Campuswide Honors Program, 1200 Student Services II; telephone (949) 824-5461; e-mail: honors@uci.edu; World Wide Web: http://www.honors.uci.edu/.

Education Abroad Program

Upper-division students have the opportunity to experience a different culture while making progress toward degree objectives through the Education Abroad Program (EAP). EAP is an overseas study program which operates in cooperation with host universities and colleges throughout the world. Additional information is available in the Center for International Education section.

Interdisciplinary Minors

A variety of interdisciplinary minors are available to all UCI students. The minor in Conflict Resolution, sponsored by the International Studies program in the School of Social Sciences, provides skills in conflict analysis and resolution and a useful understanding of integrative institutions at the local, regional, and international levels.

Information about the following minors is available in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

The minor in Asian Studies creates opportunities for students to explore Asian topics in a variety of fields, to develop advanced language skills, and to acquire broader perspectives.

The minor in Chicano/Latino Studies is designed to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language, history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, film, drama, music) accomplishments in the Chicano/ Latino communities.

The minor in Global Sustainability trains students to understand the changes that need to be made in order for the human population to live in a sustainable relationship with the resources available on this planet.

The minor in the History and Philosophy of Science explores how science is actually done and how it has influenced history, and is concerned with determining what science and mathematics are, accounting for their apparent successes, and resolving problems of philosophical interest that arise in the sciences.

The minor in Native American Studies focuses on history, culture, religion, and the environment. The three core courses serve as an introduction to the Native American experience from the perspective of different historical periods and frameworks of analysis.

The minor in Religious Studies focuses on the comparative study of religions in various cultural settings around the world and seeks to provide a wide-ranging academic understanding and knowledge of the religious experience in society.

Information about the following interdisciplinary minors is available in the School of Humanities section.

The minor in African-American Studies offers undergraduate students an opportunity to study those societies and cultures established by the people of the African diaspora and to investigate the African-American experience from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and theoretical approaches.

The minor in Asian American Studies examines the historical and contemporary experiences of Asians after their arrival in the United States and seeks to provide an awareness of the history, culture (e.g., literary and creative art accomplishments), psychology, and social organization of Asian American communities.

The minor in Latin American Studies is designed to develop in students an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of Latin American issues in the areas of language, history, culture, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, political science, health, folk medicine, and creative (art, dance, film, drama, music) accomplishments.

The minor in Women's Studies offers a curriculum drawing from the humanities, social sciences, and the arts to examine contributions of women from different backgrounds to culture and society and to explore women's and men's lives in the context of changing gender relations.

CAREERS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES

Business and industry often look to social science graduates to fill positions in management, finance, marketing and advertising, personnel, production supervision, and general administration. In the public sector, a wide variety of opportunities are available in city, county, state, and federal government. Teaching is a frequently chosen career at all levels from elementary school teacher to professor. In addition, many graduates enter professional practice, becoming lawyers, psychologists, researchers, or consultants in various fields.

Because all Social Sciences degrees involve an educational program that is interdisciplinary and that prepares students to understand quantitative methods of data analysis, graduates of the School are well-positioned for research and analysis careers at all levels of government and in private firms. Their solid grounding in contemporary social science methods and their familiarity with a broad spectrum of social scientific thinking gives them an excellent foundation for the pursuit of further training in graduate and professional programs.

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. Additional information is available in the Career Center section.

Graduate Program

The School of Social Sciences offers graduate training in the following areas: Anthropology (Ph.D. in Anthropology), Cognitive Sciences (Ph.D. in Psychology), Economics (Ph.D. in Economics), Logic and Philosophy of Science (Ph.D. in Philosophy), Mathematical Behavioral Sciences (Ph.D. in Social Science), Politics and Society (Ph.D. in Political Science), and Sociology (Ph.D. in Sociology). In addition, an interdisciplinary concentration in Public Choice is offered within the programs in Economics and Political Science, a specialized concentration in Transportation Economics is offered within the program in Economics, an emphasis in Social Networks is offered within the Mathematical Behavioral Sciences concentration, and a concentration in Political Psychology is offered within the program in Political Science. When an applicant's interests lie outside of or across these areas, the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, School of Social Sciences, may, on rare occasions, appoint a three-member faculty committee to guide an independent course of study for the Ph.D. degree in Social Science.

The M.A. degree in Anthropology, Economics, Philosophy, Social Science, or Sociology may be conferred upon students in Ph.D. programs after completion of the necessary requirements.

Additionally, the M.A. degree program in Social Science with a concentration in Demographic and Social Analysis is supervised by faculty from the Schools of Social Sciences and Social Ecology. Students may apply directly to this M.A. program.

The M.S. and Ph.D. degree program in Transportation Science is supervised by an interdepartmental faculty group. Information is available in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

In cooperation with the UCI Department of Education, students enrolled in a School of Social Sciences graduate program may choose to pursue a teaching credential while working toward their degree. After completion of requirements for an M.A. degree, students may apply for admission into the credential program administered by the Department of Education. As required by law, the applicant must pass the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST), obtain a Certification of Clearance, and successfully complete the appropriate subject area examination or an approved subject-matter program. A detailed description of the program may be obtained from the Social Sciences Graduate Office or the Department of Education.

ADMISSION

Potential graduate students should apply by January 15 to receive fullest consideration for financial aid. Applicants should indicate the title of the degree sought (Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, or Social Science), and the academic area of concentration (see above). All applicants are required to submit Graduate Record Examination General Test scores. Letters of recommendation and the applicant's statement of interest are important factors in the admission decision.

In addition to the University admission requirements described in the Research and Graduate Studies section, individual graduate programs may prescribe special requirements or expectations of applicants, subject to the approval of the Graduate Council. Such requirements are minimum standards only; successful applicants typically must exceed them by a substantial margin.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Many students receive financial support in the form of fellowships, teaching assistantships, or research assistantships available under grants to individual faculty. Before accepting an offer of admission with financial support for the first year, applicants should inquire about the likelihood of such support in future years. Occasionally, a newly admitted student may receive a multiyear commitment of some specified financial support, but this is not the rule. Students are also advised to seek aid from sources external to the University. (NOTE: Teaching assistantships do not include remission of fees or nonresident tuition.)

LENGTH OF STUDY AND RESIDENCE

The normal time for completion of the Ph.D. degree is either five, six, or seven years, depending upon the specific program. See the department sections for information.

Students admitted to the M.A. concentration in Demographic and Social Analysis should be able to earn the M.A. within one to two years.

Because the intellectual training offered by the School requires full-time study and constant contact with the faculty, the School does not accept part-time students.

Click on the departments listed at the top of this document for information about specific graduate programs.


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