SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, CONTINUED

Undergraduate Programs

School Requirements

Special Programs

Undergraduate Courses

OVERVIEW

This is the ideal time to be studying biology. We are solving problems today whose solutions were unimaginable even a few years ago, and implications for our society, our health, and our environment are profound. The School of Biological Sciences is dedicated to providing students with a unique course of study that fosters a deep appreciation for the exciting facts and concepts in the field, an education that allows graduates to excel in their chosen careers.

To that end, the School has recently redesigned the curriculum to remain on the cutting edge of biological education. All first-year students are enrolled in a Biology Freshman Seminar of their choice with one of 100 faculty members. Each seminar is different, designed by each member of the faculty to share their excitement about a particular aspect of biology with new students. Students also are introduced to basic concepts in ecology and evolutionary biology, as well as cellular and molecular biology, in that first year. The core set of courses in biology continues into the second year, featuring genetics, biochemistry, and molecular biology, followed in the third and fourth year by a choice of advanced courses in biology. Since biology is a laboratory discipline, students complete a series of laboratory courses in which they learn both the techniques and approaches needed to solve problems in biology.

Finally, the faculty expect that most students will engage in cutting-edge research in one of more than 250 laboratories and medical clinics in the School of Biological Sciences and the UCI School of Medicine. It is in these situations that faculty train students to think in a sophisticated way about real-world problems. There is also no feeling of excitement greater than finding out something about the world that no one has ever known before, a feeling afforded in biology only by participation in research. The Excellence in Research Program allows students to present their work and be recognized for their performance with a series of awards and publication of their reports in the School's Journal of Undergraduate Research. The combination of small seminars that transmit the faculty's enthusiasm for biology, the set of core classes that instructs students in the concepts of biology, the advanced classes that allow a deep understanding of specialized aspects of biology, the laboratory courses that convey the practical aspects of problem-solving in biology, and the research experiences that engage students in the real excitement in revealing new information about biology, come together to provide an extraordinary experience for students. The Honors Program in the School of Biological Sciences further enhances the educational experience for the best students.

Biology students have the option of specializing in areas of biology that best fit their interests, completing courses for degree programs in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Developmental and Cell Biology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Neurobiology, Pharmaceutical Sciences, or Plant Biology.

Those students who wish to receive a broader education in the area can opt to complete a major in Biological Sciences. Completion of any of these majors forms an excellent basis for application to either graduate or professional studies such as medical school, and graduates of the School of Biological Sciences are routinely accepted to the most prestigious programs in the country.

The quality of the faculty in the School of Biological Sciences has remained high while increasing steadily in number over the past few years, giving students a remarkable range of expertise in biology and with it, a large number of different advanced courses and research opportunities. In addition, their efforts have brought several high-impact research units to the campus, such as the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, the Center for Virus Research, the Beckman Laser Institute, the Cancer Research Institute, the Developmental Biology Center, the Center for Immunology, the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, the Macromolecular Structure Research Unit, the Center for Molecular and Mitochondrial Medicine and Genetics, the Institute for Genomics and Bioinformatics, and the Reeve-Irvine Research Center, all of which are accessible to undergraduates. The School of Biological Sciences also has close research and teaching collaborations with faculty in the Schools of Medicine, Physical Sciences, Social Ecology, and Social Sciences; the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences; and The Henry Samueli School of Engineering.

In addition to the regular University requirements for admission, students interested in the biological sciences should include in their high school curriculum, in addition to a course in biology, four years of mathematics, as well as courses in chemistry and physics, which are now an integral part of most contemporary biological work.

The School's professional counseling staff is always available for consultation to students regarding the many decisions in their academic program. They also are trained to provide guidance in the application process to both professional and graduate schools, a real advantage to the high proportion of students in the School of Biological Sciences who go on to pursue advanced degrees.

Opportunities are available at the graduate level to specialize in Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biological Chemistry, Developmental and Cell Biology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Experimental Pathology, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Neurobiology and Behavior, and Physiology and Biophysics.

Degrees

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

B.S.

Biological Sciences

B.S., M.S., Ph.D.

Developmental and Cell Biology

B.S.

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

B.S.

Genetics

B.S.

Microbiology and Immunology

B.S.

Neurobiology

B.S.

Pharmaceutical Sciences

B.S.

Plant Biology

B.S

HONORS

Honors Program in the School of Biological Sciences

The Honors Program in the School of Biological Sciences provides an opportunity for outstanding majors in the School to pursue advanced work in independent research via participation in the Excellence in Biological Sciences Research Program and earn Honors in Biological Sciences upon graduation. Admission to the program is based on an application to participate in the Excellence in Biological Sciences Research program filed during the middle part of the fall quarter of the year of the student's participation. Additionally, students must have a minimum overall 3.5 grade point average and a minimum 3.5 grade point average in all required Biological Sciences courses. The Program requires a minimum of three quarters enrollment in research (Biological Sciences 199) including successful completion of Biological Sciences H195 and the Excellence in Biological Sciences Research program.

Graduation with Honors

Of the graduating seniors, no more than 12 percent will receive Latin honors: approximately 1 percent summa cum laude, 3 percent magna cum laude, and 8 percent cum laude. The selection for these awards is based on spring quarter rank-ordered grade point averages. To be eligible for honors at graduation, the student must, by the end of spring quarter of the senior year, be officially declared a Biological Sciences major; submit an Application to Graduate by the end of winter quarter of the senior year; have completed at least 72 units in residence at a UC campus by the end of the spring quarter of the academic year in which they graduate; have all corrections to the academic record processed by the Registrar's Office by the end of spring quarter; if completing the Language Other Than English general education requirement with a language exemption test, pass the test by the end of spring quarter; and be able to verify completion of all course work by the end of the spring quarter of the senior year. Other important factors are considered (see "Honors Recognition" in the Honors Opportunities information in the Division of Undergraduate Education section).

Excellence in Research Program

The School of Biological Sciences believes that successful participation in creative research is one of the highest academic goals its undergraduates can attain. Students enrolled in Undergraduate Research (Biological Sciences 199) and who meet the eligibility requirements have an opportunity to present the results of their research endeavors to peers and faculty. Those students awarded with "Excellence in Research" will then have their papers published in the School's Journal of Undergraduate Research in the Biological Sciences.

The program begins each fall with a series of instructional workshops and continues through spring with students completing a scientific paper, poster presentation, and scientific talk. The program then concludes in June with the Excellence in Research Reception where certificates are presented. Contact the Biological Sciences Student Affairs Office in 231 Steinhaus Hall or visit the Web site at http://www.bio.uci.edu/studentaffairs for additional information.

Campuswide Honors Program

The Campuswide Honors Program is available to selected high-achieving students from all academic majors from their freshman through senior years. For more information contact the Campuswide Honors Program, 1200 Student Services II; (949) 824-5461; honors@uci.edu; http://www.honors.uci.edu/.

Dean's Honor List. The quarterly Dean's Honor List is composed of students who have received a 3.5 grade point average while carrying a minimum of 12 graded units.

Biological Sciences Honors, Scholarships, Prizes, and Awards

The following honors, scholarships, prizes, and awards are presented at the annual Biological Sciences Honors Convocation held the first week of June.

Dean's Academic Achievement and Service Awards. Awards are based on academic excellence and exceptional service to the School of Biological Sciences.

Excellence in Biological Sciences Alumni Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 2002 with the generous support of Biological Sciences alumni. The award is for undergraduate Biological Sciences majors in their junior year who have demonstrated academic excellence and outstanding extracurricular activities.

Excellence in Research Award. Undergraduates who have successfully completed the requirements for this program are presented with Excellence in Research certificates.

Brian Atwood Scholarship. The Brian Atwood Scholarship is awarded to a sophomore Biological Sciences major who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in both scholarship and service to the UCI community.

Robert H. Avnet Memorial Scholarship. The Robert H. Avnet Memorial Scholarship has been established to assist a student interested in becoming a physician. The student must be a Biological Sciences major and demonstrate financial need.

Carol Becker McGaugh Award. This award is given to a junior with outstanding research in the area of neurobiology of learning and memory.

Robert Ernst Prize for Excellence in Research in the Biological Sciences. This prize is awarded to a student for meritorious research conducted in the field of biology.

Robert Ernst Prize for Excellence in Student Research in Plant Biology. This prize is awarded to a student for meritorious research conducted in plant biology.

Dean's Award for Excellence in Research. Three students receiving the highest ratings for their papers and oral presentations at the Excellence in Research Program will receive the Dean's Award for Excellence in Research.

M. Marlene Godoy Student Award. The scholarship is awarded to a sophomore planning a career in health sciences, either in a clinical or academic setting.

Dr. William F. Holcomb Scholarship. The intent of the Dr. William F. Holcomb Scholarship is to support biomedical or marine biological studies. The Scholarship is to be used to support continuing academic work over a specific period.

Laurence J. Mehlman Prize. The Laurence J. Mehlman Prize is awarded to an undergraduate student in the School of Biological Sciences who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in both scholarship and service to the School.

Edward Mittelman Memorial Fund Scholarship. The Edward Mittelman Memorial Fund Scholarship is presented to an outstanding Biological Sciences student who will pursue a career in the medical field.

Edward A. Steinhaus Memorial Award. The Edward A. Steinhaus Memorial Award is given to outstanding Biological Sciences graduate student teaching assistants who demonstrate promise as future educators.

Joseph H. Stephens Award for Outstanding Research in Ecology and Conservation. This award is granted to an undergraduate student who has demonstrated outstanding research in ecology and conservation.

Joseph H. Stephens Award for Outstanding Research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This award is granted to an undergraduate student who has demonstrated outstanding research in biochemistry and molecular biology.

Jayne Unzelman Scholarship. The Jayne Unzelman Scholarship is presented to an undergraduate student who has shown academic excellence and been of service to the School of Biological Sciences and/or the University, and to the community.

Special Service Awards. These awards are given to students who have demonstrated great service to the School, the University, and/or community.

Undergraduate Programs

ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

In the event that the number of students who elect Biological Sciences as a major exceeds the number of positions available, applicants may be subject to screening beyond minimum University of California admissions requirements.

Freshmen: Preference will be given to those who rank the highest using the selection criteria as stated in the Undergraduate Admissions section of this Catalogue.

Transfer students: Junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall and who satisfactorily complete course prerequisites will be given preference for admission. All applicants must complete one year of general chemistry with laboratory with grades of B or better; one year of biology courses equivalent to Biological Sciences 93, 94, and 100L at UCI with a grade of C or better in each course; and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.

No student may enter as a double major, but Biological Sciences students interested in other areas may apply to become double majors after the first quarter, if the second school or program approves. A strong academic performance in the second area is requisite for acceptance as a double major.

CHANGE OF MAJOR

Students who wish to declare any major within the School of Biological Sciences should contact the Biological Sciences Student Affairs Office in 231 Steinhaus Hall for information about change-of-major requirements, procedures, and policies. Information can also be found at http://www.changeofmajor.uci.edu. Change of Major petitions are accepted and reviewed by the School throughout the year.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE

All School of Biological Sciences students must complete the following requirements.

University Requirements: See pages 58-63.

School Requirements

Biological Sciences 2B, 194S; Biological Sciences Core 93, 94, 97, 98, 99, 100L; Chemistry 1A-B-C, 1LB-LC or H2A-B-C, 1LB-1LC; Chemistry 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB or 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB; Mathematics 2A-B and one course selected from Biological Sciences 7 or Mathematics 2D or 2J or 7; Physics 3A-B-C, 3LB-LC or 7A-B, 7LA-LB and 7D, 7LD or 7E.

Prerequisites for all Biological Sciences Core courses are rigorously enforced. Students must have a 2.0 cumulative grade point average in the Biological Sciences Core Curriculum, four upper-division elective courses, and three upper-division laboratories.

School Residence Requirement: After matriculation, all courses required for the major must be successfully completed at UCI. The School of Biological Sciences strictly enforces the UCI residence requirement. At least 36 of the final 45 units completed by a student for the bachelor's degree must be earned in residence at the UCI campus. (The School considers courses taken in the Education Abroad Program to be in-residence courses.)

Undergraduate Major in Biological Sciences

The Biological Sciences major presents a unified, in-depth study of modern biology. The Biological Sciences Core is a five-quarter series of courses ranging from ecology and evolutionary biology, to genetics, biochemistry, and molecular biology. Important laboratory techniques and methodology are presented in upper-division laboratories. Advanced elective courses provide an opportunity to continue to diversify students' exposure to the biological sciences or to gain a much more in-depth study of a particular area of the biological sciences.

NOTE: Biological Sciences majors who successfully complete their second year of study may elect to apply for a change of major to one for the following: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Developmental and Cell Biology, Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Neurobiology, Pharmaceutical Sciences, or Plant Biology. Students may apply directly to the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology major when they apply for admission to UCI. Contact the Biological Sciences Student Affairs Office for more information.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

University Requirements: See pages 58-63.

School Requirements: See this page, above.

Major Requirements

A.   Required Major Courses: Three courses selected from Biological Sciences D103, D104, D105, E106, E109, N110.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: Three laboratories required. At least two selected from Biological Sciences D111L, E112L, E115L, E166, M114L, M116L, M118L, M121L, M122L, M124L, N113L; one laboratory can be satisfied with E179L, E161L, M174L, or completion of Excellence in Research in the Biological Sciences.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: Four upper-division, four-unit courses selected from Biological Sciences D103-D190, E106-E190, M114-M190, N110-N190. Biological Sciences D103, D104, D105, E106, E109, N110 may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. Chemistry 130A-B-C or 131A-B-C or Physics 147A-B can be used to partially satisfy the elective requirement. Additionally, Psychology/Biological Sciences double majors may also use Psychology 112A-B-C to partially satisfy the elective requirement.

NOTE: Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology, and Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Concentration in Biological Sciences Education

The optional concentration in Biological Sciences Education requires eight courses: Biological Sciences 14, 101, 102, Physics 20A, 20B, Earth System Science 1, 7, and one course selected from Education 108, 124, 128, 131, 136, or 173.

The requirements for a general Biological Sciences B.S. degree for students in this concentration will be reduced by one upper-division laboratory course (major requirement B) and two upper-division biology electives (major requirement C). Students pursuing other majors within the School of Biological Sciences will need specific departmental approval for the reduction of degree requirements when completing this concentration.

Requirements for the Minor in Biological Sciences

Nine courses are required, no more than two of which may be taken on a Pass/Not Pass basis:

A.   Three courses selected from Biological Sciences 93, 94, 97, 98, and 99. (Prerequisites are strictly enforced. Exceptions may be made for some majors that accept the above courses for degree requirements. Consult with the Biological Sciences Student Affairs Office or the academic counseling office of the major.)

B.   Six three- or four-unit courses selected from Biological Sciences 5-H90 (excluding 46), 93-99, 100L, and D103-D190, E106-E190, M114-M190, N110-N190. Three courses must be upper-division. Prerequisites are strictly enforced. (Courses used to satisfy group A may not also be used to satisfy group B.)

Residence requirement for the minor: A minimum of six courses required for the minor must be completed at UCI. Approved courses taken in the Education Abroad Program are considered to be in-residence courses.

NOTE: Students in any of the majors within the School of Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology, or Public Health Sciences may not minor in Biological Sciences.

PLANNING A PROGRAM OF STUDY

Since biological sciences courses are built upon a base of the physical sciences, it is very important for students to take their required physical sciences early, particularly general and organic chemistry. Students who have not completed high school chemistry are well advised to complete a preparatory chemistry course before entering UCI. The academic program shown is only a suggested program. Students should consult the Biological Sciences Student Affairs Office for individual academic planning.

Freshmen will normally take Humanities 1A or lower-division writing courses, Chemistry 1A, Biological Sciences 93, and a freshman seminar (Biological Sciences 2A) during the fall quarter. Students will then continue with Biological Sciences 94, 2B, complete their general chemistry requirement, and continue with Humanities or lower-division writing during the remaining winter and spring quarters.

Sophomores begin organic chemistry (Chemistry 51A or 52A), continue the Biological Sciences Core with 97, 98, 99, and 100L; students enrolling in 100L must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S. Sophomores often begin taking courses in other disciplines to meet the UCI general education requirement and fulfill their mathematics requirement if they have not done so as freshmen.

During their junior year, most majors continue with the Biological Sciences electives and take physics. Students who intend to double major in Chemistry will be required to take Physics 7A-B and 7D or 7E in place of Physics 3A-B-C. Juniors may complete their general education requirements and usually start their research and their upper-division biology laboratory courses.

Finally, during their senior year, students continue their research and complete their remaining major requirements.

Students in the Biological Sciences major are required to make progress toward their degree, and their progress will be monitored. If normal academic progress toward the degree in Biological Sciences is not being met, students will be subject to probation.

Sample Program — Biological Sciences

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. 2B

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

Humanities 1A1

Humanities 1B

Humanities 1C

Bio. Sci. 2A

Math 2A

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. Sci. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA2

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2B

Bio. Sci. 7 or Math. 2D or 2J or 7

Bio. Sci. 100L3

Bio. Sci. 194S

Junior

Required Major course

Required Major course

Required Major course

Physics

Physics

Physics

Elective/Research5

Elective/Research

Bio. Sci. elective4

Elective/Research

Senior

Bio. Sci. elective

Bio. Sci. elective

Bio. Sci. elective

Bio. Sci. U-D Lab

Bio. Sci. U-D Lab

Bio. Sci. U-D Lab

Elective

Research

Research

Electives

Electives

1Students have the option of taking Humanities 1A or lower-division writing courses.
2Chemistry 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB may be taken instead of 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB.
3Prerequisites are completion of or concurrent enrollment in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S, and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; 100L must be completed prior to taking the three upper-division labs.
4In addition to the listed Biological Sciences elective courses, Chemistry 130A-B-C or 131A-B-C, Physics 147A-B, and Psychology 112A-B-C (for Biological Sciences/Psychology double majors) are counted as Biological Sciences elective courses.
5Electives should be chosen with the following purposes in mind: UCI general education requirements; students' own breadth; preprofessional training.

Undergraduate Major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Few areas of Biological Sciences remain that are not impacted by studies at the chemical and molecular level. The major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is designed to provide a comprehensive background in this modern, conceptual understanding of biology. Students who wish to begin in-depth study of the molecular basis in any of a variety of fields, including development, gene expression, immunology, pathogenesis, disease, virology, and evolution, can do so through this major. This program will be especially attractive to those students who intend to pursue an advanced degree in biological or medical sciences.

The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major is based upon required courses in Advanced Biochemistry and Advanced Molecular Biology (Biological Sciences M114 and M116). These courses, together with a wide variety of elective course offerings, provide majors the choice to either explore the breadth of the field or follow a more in-depth study of any of its subdisciplines. For students interested in the interface between biology and chemistry, this program articulates well with a second major in Chemistry.

The program of study emphasizes laboratory experience and its integration with basic theory. This is accomplished in three ways: first, through coordination between the advanced courses in Biochemistry (M114) and Molecular Biology (M116), and laboratory courses in Biochemistry (M114L) and Molecular Biology (M116L) which provide students with the basic laboratory skills and an appreciation for the experimental foundations of the field; second, through advanced laboratories in Immunology (M121L) and Virology (M124L) which provide students with the opportunity to develop cutting edge research skills; and third, by emphasizing independent research sponsored by a participating faculty member. The program encourages the research interests of students in subdisciplines other than immunology or virology by offering the opportunity to substitute one year of independent research for the advanced laboratory.

The major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is designed to provide students with the appropriate tools and training to successfully pursue graduate degrees that emphasize basic scientific research, including Ph.D. and M.S. training as well as combined M.D./Ph.D. programs. In addition, and particularly with the explosive growth in biotechnology and its significant influence in everyday life, graduates could use their backgrounds very effectively to pursue careers in business, education, law, and public affairs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

University Requirements: See pages 58-63.

School Requirements: See this page, above.

Major Requirements

A.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences M114 and M116.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: Biological Sciences M114L, M116L, and one additional laboratory selected from M121L, M124L, or one year of research (Biological Sciences 199) approved by the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Faculty Board.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: Four courses selected from Biological Sciences D137, D146, D147, M120-M189, Chemistry 128, 130A-B-C, or 131A-B-C (two of the four must be from Biological Sciences). Two additional four-unit courses selected from Biological Sciences D103-D190, E106-E190, M120-M190, N110-N190, or Chemistry 128, 130A-B-C, or 131A-B-C. No course may be used to satisfy more than one requirement.

Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time, but typically in the spring of the sophomore year. Review of applications submitted at that time and selection to the major by the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Faculty Board is completed during the summer. Information can also be found at http://www.changeofmajor.uci.edu. Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences, Applied Ecology, and Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program — Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. 2B

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

Humanities 1A1

Humanities 1B

Humanities 1C

Bio. Sci. 2A

Math. 2A

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. Sci. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA2

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2B

Bio. Sci. 7 or Math. 2D or 2J or 7

Bio. Sci. 100L3

Bio. Sci. 194S

General Ed/Elective

Junior

Bio. Sci. M114L

Bio. Sci. M114

Bio. Sci. M116

Biochem./Mol. elective

Biochem./Mol. elective

Biochem./Mol. elective

Bio. Sci. U-D lab/research

Bio. Sci. U-D lab/research

Physics 3C, 3LC

Physics 3A

Physics 3B, 3LB

Senior

Biochem./Mol. elective

Bio. Sci. elective or lab

Bio. Sci. elective

Bio. Sci. M116L

Research/Elective

Bio. Sci. M121L/M124L or research

Research/Elective

General Ed./Elective

Research/Elective

General Ed./Elective

General Ed./Elective

1Students have the option of taking Humanities 1A or lower-division writing courses.
2Chemistry 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB may be taken instead of 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB.
3Prerequisites are completion of or concurrent enrollment in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S, and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; 100L must be completed prior to taking upper-division labs.

Undergraduate Majors, continued