SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, CONTINUED

Undergraduate Courses

Undergraduate Major in Developmental and Cell Biology

The Developmental and Cell Biology major is intended to provide students with intensive training in cutting edge approaches to understanding the structure and function of cells and how they interact to produce a complex organism, starting with a fertilized egg. The focus of the B.S. in Developmental and Cell Biology is to provide students with intensive training aimed at preparing them for graduate programs in modern Developmental and Cell Biology or other biomedical sciences. In-depth training in the molecular basis of cell and developmental biology will be coupled with integrating knowledge obtained from the recent explosive advances in genomic technology to provide a strong working understanding of how to approach problems in basic research.

The major has distinctive features. The first is a reduction in the number of required courses, allowing students the opportunity to focus more deeply on training in Developmental and Cell Biology. The second is the implementation of a new course in Genomic and Proteomic analysis that is closely tied to problems in genetics, developmental, and cell biology. Understanding the connections among these disciplines and how to apply the appropriate tools for defining and answering fundamental questions in biomedical research is a critical tool for success in research. Another distinctive feature of the major is the opportunity to replace two upper-division laboratory courses with mentored Biological Sciences 199 individual research in faculty laboratories. This offers students the opportunity to apply the tools they have acquired during formal course work to current problems at the frontiers of research. Lastly, students majoring in Developmental and Cell Biology have faculty advisors with whom they meet at least quarterly. The faculty advisors help students plan their curriculum, select appropriate 199 projects and sponsoring labs, and as a group grant petitions and certify the degree. The combination of new upper-division courses, more flexibility in the curriculum, the option for mentored research, and close interaction with faculty advisors will help the Developmental and Cell Biology majors to develop an appreciation of the nature of research and establish a strong foundation for future success in graduate or professional schools.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN DEVELOPMENTAL AND CELL BIOLOGY

University Requirements: See pages 56–62.

School Requirements: See page 130.

Major Requirements

A.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences D103, D104, D114, and D145.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: Biological Sciences D111L and two selected from E112L, E115L, E166, M114L, M116L, M118L, M121L, M122L, M124L, N113L. Students may petition to substitute Excellence in Research (Biological Sciences 199) for two upper-division laboratories (other than D111L); 199 research is strongly encouraged. The 199 laboratory must be approved by the Department, and Excellence in Research must be successfully completed. Final approval is given by the Department.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: one from Biological Sciences D136, D137, D148; one from Biological Sciences D151, M144; and three from Biological Sciences D105, D129, D130, D134, D136, D137, D143, D146, D148, D149, D151, D187, E109, E141, E157, M114, M116, M125, M137, M144, M151, N110, N153, N154.

Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Developmental and Cell Biology is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time. Information can also be found at http://www.changeofmajor.uci.edu. Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences or with Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program — Developmental and Cell Biology

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. 2B

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

Humanities 1A1

Humanities 1B

Humanities 1C

Bio. Sci. 2A

Bio. Sci. 194S

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. Sci. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA2

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2A

Math. 2B

Math. 2D or 2J or 7, or Stats. 7 or 8

Junior

Bio. Sci. D103

Bio. Sci. D104

Bio. Sci. D111L

Physics 3A

Physics 3B, 3LB

Physics 3C, 3LC

Bio. Sci. 100L3

Bio. Sci. D145

Bio. Sci. D114

General Ed.

General Ed.

Senior

U-D Lab or Bio. Sci. 199

U-D Lab or Bio. Sci. 199

U-D Lab or Bio. Sci. elective

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

Bio. Sci. 199 research or General Ed.

Bio. Sci. 199 research or General Ed.

1Students have the option of taking Humanities 1A or lower-division writing courses.
2Chemistry 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB may be taken instead of 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB.
3Prerequisites are completion of or concurrent enrollment in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S, and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; 100L must be completed prior to taking upper-division labs.

Undergraduate Major in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

It has famously been said that nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. This major is designed to allow students to make sense of biology. It is a broad major, including components of evolutionary biology, ecology, and physiology. Faculty interests are also broad and include the evolution of aging, conservation biology, biogeography, plant and animal population and community ecology, the evolution of infectious disease, evolutionary physiology, behavioral ecology, host-disease interactions, evolutionary genetics, marine ecology, genetics of invasive species, and plant population biology. Following graduation students will be especially well prepared to enter graduate programs in either ecology or evolution for advanced study. The major also provides the foundation to pursue careers in governmental and non-governmental environmental organizations, as well as professional schools. The Department considers undergraduate experience in research an integral component of a scientific education, and majors are encouraged to participate in Biological Sciences 199 in which they will be mentored by an individual faculty member within the Department.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

University Requirements: See pages 56–62.

School Requirements: See page 130.

Major Requirements

A.   Required Major Courses: Statistics 8 and Biological Sciences E106 and E107.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: Biological Sciences E115L, E166, and one selected from Biological Sciences D111L, E112L, E161L, E172L, E179L, M114L, M116L, M118L, M121L, M122L, M124L, N113L.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: one from Biological Sciences D103, D104, D105, E109, N110; and three four-unit courses from Biological Sciences E118-E190 and D147. Biological Sciences 199 Research is strongly encouraged.

Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences or with Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. E106

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

Humanities 1A1

Humanities 1B

Humanities 1C

Bio. Sci. 2A

Bio. Sci. 2B

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. Sci. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA2

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2A

Math. 2B

Stats. 8

Bio. Sci. 194S

Bio. Sci. 100L3

Junior

Bio. Sci. E166

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

Bio. Sci. E115L

Physics 3A

Physics 3B, 3LB

Physics 3C, 3LC

Bio. Sci. research

Bio. Sci. research

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

General Ed.

Senior

Bio. Sci. E107

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

U-D Lab

Bio. Sci. research

General Ed.

Bio. Sci. research

General Ed.

Bio. Sci. research

Elective

1Students have the option of taking Humanities 1A or lower-division writing courses.
2Chemistry 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB may be taken instead of 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB.
3Prerequisites are completion of or concurrent enrollment in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S, and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; 100L must be completed prior to taking upper-division labs.

Undergraduate Major in Genetics

Genetics pervades every aspect of modern society, from newspaper articles to talk shows, from discussions on health care to discussions on cloning. With the sequencing of the human genome, it is more important than ever for biology students to have a broad background in the study of heredity and evolution. The Genetics major is designed to benefit motivated undergraduates who have a particular interest in learning about developmental genetics, evolutionary genetics, and molecular genetics and to allow them to explore how our knowledge of genetic mechanisms contributes to our understanding of human development and disease. The Genetics major will accommodate students interested in the study of inheritance either as a basic discipline or in terms of its applied aspects in biotechnology, medicine, and agriculture, but will be especially attractive to those students desiring focused study and preparation for graduate training.

Genetics majors begin their study in the junior year with two Genetics courses (Biological Sciences M137 and D137) and a Genomics and Proteomics course (D145). This series of courses is designed to give students an understanding of genetic mechanisms and teach them how to define and answer fundamental questions in biomedical research. Additionally, students choose at least two electives that deal with topics such as the molecular biology of cancer, human genetic diseases, developmental genetics, and the genetics of aging. Finally, Genetics majors are encouraged to explore laboratory research by enrolling in Biological Sciences 199. Laboratory research not only expands a student's technical skills, but is also designed to allow faculty members to mentor Genetics majors. All students majoring in Genetics have a faculty advisor with whom they meet at least quarterly. The faculty advisor helps students plan their curriculum and select appropriate Biological Sciences 199 research projects. Genetics majors also have an opportunity to meet with other Genetics majors on a regular basis and participate in research talks.

The Genetics major provides graduates with advanced training in the skills necessary to pursue graduate degrees in biomedical research. These include Ph.D. graduate programs, teacher-training programs, medical school, and veterinary school. Genetics graduates may also use their backgrounds effectively in planning careers in law, business, education, and public affairs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN GENETICS

University Requirements: See pages 56–62.

School Requirements: See page 130.

Major Requirements

A.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences D103, D104, D113, D137, D145, and M137.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: three selected from Biological Sciences D111L, E112L, E115L, E166, M114L, M116L, M118L, M121L, M122L, M124L, N113L. Students may petition to substitute Excellence in Research (Biological Sciences 199) for two upper-division laboratories; 199 research is strongly encouraged. The 199 laboratory must be approved by the Department, and Excellence in Research must be successfully completed. Final approval is given by the Department.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: two selected from Biological Sciences D105, D129, D130, D136, D143, D146, D148, D149, D151, D187, E109, E141, E157, M114, M116, M125, M144, M151, N110, N153, N154.

Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Genetics is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time. Information can also be found at http://www.changeofmajor.uci.edu. Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences or with Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program Genetics

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. 2B

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

Humanities 1A1

Humanities 1B

Humanities 1C

Bio. Sci. 2A

Bio. Sci. 194S

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. Sci. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA2

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2A

Math. 2B

Math. 2D, 2J, or Stats. 8

Bio. Sci. 100L3

Junior

Bio. Sci. D103

Bio. Sci. D104

U-D Lab or Bio. Sci. 199

Physics 3A

Physics 3B, 3LB

Physics 3C, 3LC

Bio. Sci. D137

Bio. Sci. M137

General Ed.

General Ed.

Bio. Sci. D113

General Ed.

Senior

U-D Lab or Bio. Sci. 199

Bio. Sci. D145

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

U-D Bio. Sci. elective

U-D lab or Bio. Sci. 199

General Ed.

General Ed.

General Ed.

General Ed.

1Students have the option of taking Humanities 1A or lower-division writing courses.
2Chemistry 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB may be taken instead of 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB.
3Prerequisites are completion of or concurrent enrollment in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S, and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; 100L must be completed prior to taking upper-division labs.

Undergraduate Major in Microbiology and Immunology

Microbiology and immunology are well-established disciplines within the life sciences. Microbiology addresses the biology of bacteria, viruses, and unicellular eukaryotes such as fungi and protozoa. Studies of microorganisms reveal basic information about processes in evolution, genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, structural biology, and ecology. Many bacteria, viruses, and protozoa cause disease in plants and animals. Hence, major areas of medicine and public health focus on these microorganisms.

Immunology encompasses efforts to understand how multicellular organisms have evolved to survive a variety of challenges to health and survival, including threats by pathogens and cancer cells. Basic questions of how immunity functions are entwined with a fundamental understanding of the consequences of microbial infection. Immunology also refers to the study of autoimmunity, the attack of the host by its own immune system.

The study of viruses (virology) is an important branch of microbiology that has contributed to our understanding of most of the fundamental processes in eukaryotic molecular biology, including the discovery of oncogenes. Viruses provide an excellent tool for the study of disease, cancer, and mechanisms of gene control. With growing threat of emerging diseases and the potential for viral-based biological weapons, the study of virology was recently intensified and gained new perspectives.

The major has been designed to span the interconnected disciplines of Microbiology and Immunology, and because the scope of the disciplines is considerable, students have the opportunity to specialize within the major in one of three areas: microbiology, immunology, or virology. The curricula overlap considerably, but there are unique courses for each specialty. Students opting for the microbiology specialization can select from courses focused on prokaryotes (bacteria) or eukaryotes (parasites).

The major is designed primarily for students who are serious about pursuing careers in microbiology and immunology and is intended to provide its graduates with the appropriate tools and training to successfully pursue professional and graduate degrees emphasizing these disciplines. These include Ph.D., M.D., and combined M.D./Ph.D. programs. Majoring in Microbiology and Immunology will also provide resources for serious students wishing to use a solid background in these disciplines for career goals in business, law, public and environmental policy, education, and other pursuits.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

University Requirements: See pages 56–62.

School Requirements: See page 130.

Major Requirements for the General Track in Microbiology and Immunology

A.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences M121, M122, M124A.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: M116L and one selected from M121L, M122L, or M124L.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: Six courses selected from the following: Recommended: E124, E176, M119, M120, M124B, M125, M128, M137, M143, M205, or from Alternatives: D103, D137, M114, M116, M144.

Requirements for the Specialization in Immunology

A.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences M121, M122, M124A.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: M116L and M121L.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: Six courses selected from the following: Recommended: M119, M120, M124B, M125, or from Alternatives: D103, D137, M114, M116, M128, M137, M144.

Requirements for the Specialization in Microbiology

A.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences M121, M122, M124A.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: M116L and M122L.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: Six courses selected from the following: Recommended: E124, E176, M137, M143, or from Alternatives: D103, D137, M114, M116, M128, M144.

Requirements for the Specialization in Virology

A.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences M121, M122, M124A.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: M116L and M124L.

C.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: Six courses selected from the following: Recommended: E124, M120, M124B, M125, M205, or from Alternatives: D103, D137, M114, M116, M128, M137, M144.

NOTE: Within the Microbiology and Immunology major, only one specialization can be awarded.

Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Microbiology and Immunology is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time, but typically in the spring of the sophomore year. Review of applications submitted at that time and selection to the major by the Microbiology and Immunology Faculty Board is completed during the summer. Information can also be found at http://www.changeofmajor.uci.edu. Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences or with Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Honors Program

The Microbiology and Immunology Honors Program is available to high-achieving majors. The honors designation can be achieved by exceptional performance in research (Excellence in Research) and exceptional scholarship in the required and elective courses (3.5 GPA), and is noted on the transcript. The specific details of this achievement are to be submitted and approved by the major coordinator and the faculty oversight committee. The honors selection process occurs after winter quarter each year. Microbiology and Immunology students must enroll in Biological Sciences H195 to complete the requirements for the Excellence in Research Honors program.

Sample Program — Microbiology and Immunology

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. 2B

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

General Ed.

General Ed.

General Ed.

General Ed.

General Ed.

General Ed.

Bio. Sci. 2A

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. Sci. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA1

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2A

General Ed.

General Ed.

Bio. Sci. 100L2

Math. 2B

Math. 2D, 2J, or Stats. 8

Bio. Sci. 194S

Junior

Physics 3A

Physics 3B, 3LB

Physics 3C, 3LC

Bio. Sci. M124A

Bio. Sci. M121

Bio. Sci. M122

Bio. Sci. M116L

GE or U-D Lab

GE or U-D Lab

Bio. Sci. 199

Bio. Sci. 199

Bio. Sci. 199

Senior

U-D Biology Elective

U-D Biology Elective

U-D Biology Elective

U-D Biology Elective

U-D Biology Elective

U-D Biology Elective

Bio. Sci. 199

Bio. Sci. 199

Bio. Sci. 199

1Chemistry 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB may be taken instead of 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB.
2Prerequisites are completion of or concurrent enrollment in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S, and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; 100L must be completed prior to taking upper-division labs.

Undergraduate Major in Neurobiology

The Neurobiology major is designed to teach students how neurobiologists apply cellular, molecular, systems, and behavioral analyses in understanding how the nervous system works. The hallmark of the major is a year-long, in-depth exploration of the intellectual tools used to create, advance, and disseminate knowledge about the nervous system. Through neurobiology satellite courses, students acquire advanced factual knowledge about neurobiology. In addition, Neurobiology majors may choose to participate in research through Biological Sciences 199, where they will learn technical skills and receive mentoring from faculty members.

Students completing the Neurobiology major will be well qualified for admission to graduate or professional schools in preparation for careers in biological research, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, nursing, and other related fields. Even without additional education, they will be competitive for positions in the pharmaceutical industry, the health care delivery industry, or in medically or biologically related technologies. The major also provides valuable preparation for students interested in entering other disciplines that increasingly interface with biology and biotechnology, such as law, business administration, and government policy. Additionally, the major provides excellent preparation for students who wish to become high school science teachers.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN NEUROBIOLOGY

University Requirements: See pages 56–62.

School Requirements: See page 130.

Major Requirements

A.   Upper-Division Core: Biological Sciences N110 and two selected from D103, D104, E106, E109.

B.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences N112A-B-C.

C.   Upper-Division Laboratories: Biological Sciences N113L and two selected from D111L, E112L, E115L, E166, M114L, M116L, M118L, M122L; one of these two laboratories can be satisfied by completion of Excellence in Research in the Biological Sciences.

D.   Upper-Division Biology Electives: two selected from Biological Sciences N117-N190 and D149; one additional four-unit course selected from Biological Sciences D103-D190, E106-E190, M114-M190, N110-N190, or from Chemistry 130A-B-C, Chemistry 131A-B-C, and Physics 147A. No course may be used to satisfy more than one requirement.

Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Neurobiology is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time, but typically in the spring of the sophomore year. Review of applications submitted at that time and selection to the major by the Neurobiology Faculty Board is completed during the summer. Information can also be found at http://www.changeofmajor.uci.edu. Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences or with Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program — Neurobiology

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. 2B

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

Humanities 1A1

Humanities 1B

Humanities 1C

Bio. Sci. 2A

Math. 2A

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. Sci. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA2

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2B

Stats. 7 or 8 or Math. 2D or 2J or 7

Bio. Sci. 110

Bio. Sci. 194S

General Ed./Elective

Junior

Bio. Sci. N112A

Bio. Sci. N112B

Bio. Sci. N112C

Required Major Course

Bio. Sci. N113L

Required Major Course

Bio. Sci. 100L3

Research/Elective

Physics 3C, 3LC

Physics 3A

Physics 3B, 3LB

Senior

Bio. Sci. Elective

Bio. Sci. Lab

Bio. Sci. Lab

Bio. Sci. Elective

Bio. Sci. Elective

Research/Elective

Research/Elective

General Ed./Elective

General Ed./Elective

1Students have the option of taking Humanities 1A or lower-division writing courses.
2Chemistry 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB may be taken instead of 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB.
3Prerequisites are completion of or concurrent enrollment in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S, and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; 100L must be completed prior to taking upper-division labs.

Undergraduate Major in Pharmaceutical Sciences

The B.S. degree program in Pharmaceutical Sciences trains students in a multidisciplinary approach so that they can contribute to the advancement of new pharmaceutical technologies such as accelerated chemical synthesis, molecular-based assays using cloned enzymes and cloned metabolizing enzymes, combinatorial chemistry, in vitro biopharmaceutical techniques, and gene therapies. Pharmaceutical scientists are rapidly changing the field of drug discovery and development. The graduates of this program may seek employment in public and private sectors or choose to pursue graduate degrees such as a Ph.D., M.D., or Pharm.D.

NOTE: The School of Biological Sciences Student Affairs Office is coordinating the undergraduate affairs activities for the College of Health Sciences' Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

University Requirements: See pages 56–62.

School Requirements: See page 130.

Major Requirements

A.   Upper-Division Requirements: Pharmaceutical Sciences M170A, M170B, M171, M172, M173, M174, M174L, M175, M176, Chemistry 177, and Chemistry 177L.

B.   Upper-Division Pharmaceutical Sciences Electives (15 units):

1.   One upper-division laboratory selected from Biological Sciences D111L, E112L, M114L, M116L, M118L, M122L, M124L, N113L, Chemistry 128L, Chemistry 151L, Chemistry 160.

2.   Biological Sciences E109.

3.   One course, for students who choose electives that have these courses as prerequisites, selected from Biological Sciences D103, D104, N110, Chemistry 125.

4.   The remaining elective units may be selected from Biological Sciences D126, D129, D136, D137, D145, D146, D148, D149, D151, D153, E112L, E136, E137, E141, E142, E189, M114, M114L, M118L, M120, M121, M122, M122L, M123, M124A, M124B, M125, M128, M137, M143, M144, N113L, N153, N154, N171, Environmental Analysis and Design E112, E124, E154U, E172, E186, Chemistry 128, 128L, 151, 151L, 156, 160, and 170. (Course may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement.)

C.   Research: Nine units selected from undergraduate research courses such as Biological Sciences 199, Chemistry 180 or 199.

Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Pharmaceutical Sciences is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time, but typically in the spring of the sophomore year. Review of applications submitted at that time and selection to the major by the Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty Board is completed during the summer. Information can also be found at http://www.changeofmajor.uci.edu. Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences (including Pharmaceutical Sciences) or with Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program — Pharmaceutical Sciences

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. 2B

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

Humanities 1A1

Humanities 1B

Humanities 1C

Math 2A

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2B

Stats. 7 or 8 or Math. 2D or 2J or 7

Bio. Sci. 100L

Bio. Sci. 194S

General Ed./Elective

Junior

Physics 3A

Physics 3B, 3LB

Physics 3C, 3LC

Bio. Sci. E109

Pharm. Sci. M170A

Pharm. Sci. M170B

General Ed./Elective

General Ed./Elective

Pharm. Sci. M173

U-D PS Elective

U-D PS Elective

Pharm. Sci. M172

Senior

Pharm. Sci. M171

Chemistry 177, 177L

Pharm. Sci. M175

Pharm. Sci. M174, M174L

U-D PS Elective/Bio. 199

Pharm. Sci. M176

U-D PS Elective/Bio. 199

U-D PS Elective/Bio. 199

General Ed./Elective

General Ed./Elective

U-D PS Elective/Bio. 199

1Students have the option of taking Humanities or lower-division writing courses.

Undergraduate Major in Plant Biology

Recent developments in plant biology and biotechnology place plants in the center of biological research. A dramatic increase in the understanding of cellular and developmental processes in plants enables plant biologists to control and manipulate plants developmentally as well as genetically. The availability of unique regeneration and gene delivery systems puts plant genetic engineering to the forefront of biotechnology. Food derived from genetically engineered plants is a daily experience for the American public and a continuous topic of ethical, environmental, sociological, and political discussions.

The Plant Biology program builds on core knowledge in plant structure taught in courses required for all majors offered by the School of Biological Sciences. After completing their second year, students may be admitted to the Plant Biology major and take courses primarily focusing on cellular, developmental, and molecular aspects of plant biology in lecture and laboratory classes. Although not affiliated with agricultural sciences, a limited exposure to applied aspects, such as plant breeding and hands-on horticulture is offered through the program. The Plant Biology major is fully compatible with the major in Biological Sciences and with medical school admission requirements.

The Plant Biology major is intended to provide graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue graduate degrees in biological research, including Ph.D. and M.S. training. In addition, graduates should be excellent candidates for pharmacy schools. Furthermore, the unit requirement for the major gives enough flexibility for students to tailor the curriculum to effectively support careers in business and education. The impact of biotechnology on society and the resulting need for informed specialists make this area of study effective training for students interested in law, journalism, or public affairs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN PLANT BIOLOGY

University Requirements: See pages 56–62.

School Requirements: See page 130.

Major Requirements

A.   Required Major Courses: Biological Sciences D103, D105, D129, and D134.

B.   Upper-Division Laboratories: Biological Sciences D111L and two selected from Biological Sciences E112L, E115L, E166, M114L, M116L, M118L, M121L, M122L, M124L, N113L. Students may petition to substitute Excellence in Research (Biological Sciences 199) for one upper-division laboratory other than D111L; 199 research is strongly encouraged. The 199 laboratory must be approved by the Department, and Excellence in Research must be successfully completed. Final approval is given by the Department.

C.   Biology Electives: one from Biological Sciences D104, E106, E109; and two from Biological Sciences 9E, 11B, D137, D146, D147, D151, E118, E137, E167, E172, E175, E185, E189, M116, M122, M128, M137, M144.

Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Plant Biology is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time, but typically in the spring of the sophomore year. Information can also be found at http://www.changeofmajor.uci.edu. Double majors within the School of Biological Sciences or with Public Health Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program Plant Biology

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Bio. Sci. 93

Bio. Sci. 94

Bio. Sci. 2B

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B, 1LB

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

Humanities 1A1

Humanities 1B

Humanities 1C

Bio. Sci. 2A

Bio. Sci. 194S

Sophomore

Bio. Sci. 97

Bio. Sci. 98

Bio. Sci. 99

Chemistry 51A, 51LA2

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C

Math. 2A

Math. 2B

Math. 2D, 2J, or Stats. 8

Bio. Sci. 100L3

Bio. Sci. D105

Junior

Bio. Sci. D103

Bio. Sci. Elective

U-D Lab or Bio. Sci. 199

Physics 3A

Physics 3B, 3LB

Physics 3C, 3LC

Bio. Sci. D134

Bio. Sci. D111L

Bio. Sci. D129

General Ed.

General Ed.

General Ed.

Senior

U-D Lab

Bio. Sci. Elective

Bio. Sci. Elective

General Ed.

General Ed.

General Ed.

Research

Research

Research

1Students have the option of taking Humanities 1A or lower-division writing courses.
2Chemistry 52A-B-C, 52LA-LB may be taken instead of 51A-B-C, 51LA-LB.
3Prerequisites are completion of or concurrent enrollment in Biological Sciences 97 and 194S, and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; 100L must be completed prior to taking upper-division labs.