INFORMATION FOR ADMITTED STUDENTS

ORIENTATION

Each May information about UCI's orientation programs, sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Students, is made available to admitted students who plan to enroll in the fall.

Summer ProgramsStudent Parent Orientation Program (SPOP). Freshmen are required to attend an orientation program (except for Summer Bridge and CAMP participants). SPOP provides the opportunity for freshmen and their parents to attend a comprehensive orientation program. Each program includes academic advising, program planning, and registration for fall classes. In addition, information on housing, financial aid, campus resources, student life, and more is included. Transfer Success is a unique one-day program geared to the needs of transfer students. Held in early September, the program provides information on campus resources, student life, and tours.

Winter Quarter Orientation is held each January for new incoming transfer students. This program includes information on campus resources, student life, and "What's Next" for transfer students.

For more information about all of the orientation programs, visit http://www.dos.uci.edu/orientation; telephone (949) 824-5182; or send e-mail to orientation@uci.edu.

Welcome Week is held each fall a few days prior to the beginning of classes. A variety of academic and social activities for new and returning students are held during this time. For more information, visit http://www.dos.uci.edu/welcomeweek.

DIVISION OF UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

The core mission of the Division of Undergraduate Education is to provide campus leadership, programs, and services which enhance the quality of undergraduate education at UCI. An advocate and steward for educational excellence, the Division works with all academic units, programs, and members of the UCI community to foster a climate of learning, discovery, and engagement for every undergraduate student. Through its diverse and innovative programs and services, the Division provides support for student academic achievement, for a rich and coherent curriculum, and for outstanding teaching through the integration of teaching and research activities and the facilitation of effective pedagogy.

The Division of Undergraduate Education is responsible for the following programs and services: the Campuswide Honors Program, which also administers the Scholarship Opportunities Program; the Center for International Education, which includes the Education Abroad Program and the International Opportunities Program; the Peer Academic Advising Program and academic advising for Undecided/Undeclared students; the First-Year Integrated Program; the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program; the Learning and Academic Resource Center; Student Academic Advancement Services; the Academic Testing Center; the Teaching, Learning & Technology Center; Transfer Student Services; classroom technology support; administration of the UCDC Academic Internship Program and the UC Center Sacramento Scholar Intern Program; and the organization of the campus' student orientation programs in cooperation with the Division of Student Affairs. The Division is also responsible for the Freshman and Transfer Seminar Program where students are introduced to the research university and encouraged to become active participants in intellectual interactions with their peers and professors. The Division's programs and services are described in detail below.

The Division is responsible for the administration of the Academic Honesty Policy (approved by the UCI Academic Senate; see the Appendix) as it relates to undergraduates, and for implementing the Student Recommended Faculty Program, initiated at UCI in 1969. This is the only such program in the U.S. that affords undergraduates the opportunity to identify, select, and propose recruitment of nonrenewable faculty appointments in curricular areas of particular interest not represented at UCI. Call (949) 824-1955 for information.

Additionally, the Division's Assessment and Research Studies supports excellence in undergraduate education through assessment of student learning outcomes and a comprehensive program of research and evaluation studies related to the undergraduate experience and curriculum. The office provides information, data, and analyses to support campus decision-making related to the undergraduate curriculum, programs, and policies. It also provides consultation and technical advice for faculty and staff on assessment of student learning, program evaluation, survey research, and statistical analysis of student data.

Academic Advising

At the time of admission to UCI every undergraduate student is assigned to the school that offers the student's selected major. Students who have indicated "Undecided/Undeclared" as a major on their UC application for admission and scholarships receive assistance from the Undecided/Undeclared Advising Program until they select an academic major.

Jurisdiction over all questions of academic regulations and academic standing rests with the dean of the school to which a student is assigned or, in the case of undecided/undeclared majors, with the Dean of the Division of Undergraduate Education. Each academic unit provides academic advising for its students and processes requests to add or drop courses, waive or change graduation or other requirements, or change majors. Students are responsible for knowing the governing regulations of the school or program to which they are assigned.

While each academic unit is responsible for maintaining a system which provides academic advising, these systems differ from unit to unit. In some, all of the faculty serve as advisors; in others, only certain members of the faculty are designated as advisors. All advising offices include academic counselors, professionals who assist students in planning their program, selecting a major, and making progress toward a degree. Peer academic advisors (trained upper-division students) assist students in many of the same areas as academic counselors. In addition, they are able to answer questions relating to student life issues, providing a student perspective. Responsibility for informing students of the names of their advisors rests with the dean of the appropriate academic unit. This is done normally by letter; however, students may obtain information by telephone from the office of the appropriate dean. Telephone numbers for academic advising offices are listed in the academic unit sections of the Catalogue.

New students are encouraged to plan their academic programs with an academic counselor shortly after being admitted. The optimum time to initiate contact with an academic counselor is before the student enrolls in classes. The academic counselor can help the student determine whether the classes the student wishes to take are appropriate to the student's level of preparation, whether the proposed classes fit within the student's educational goals, and whether the classes will help meet some of the requirements for graduation.

In some schools, consultation between students and their faculty advisors is mandatory. Regardless of whether or not consultation between student and advisor is required, students are responsible for initiating and maintaining periodic contact with their assigned faculty advisor. The actual frequency of these meetings will be determined by the desires of the student, the advisor, and the unit's governing regulations.

Each quarter, new students are required to go to the appropriate academic dean's office prior to registration for advice concerning class enrollment.

Finish-in-Four Advising

Many UCI entering freshmen graduate in four years, with appropriate planning. Students who wish to be assured of earning their degree in a timely manner should contact the academic counseling office for their major to receive information about Finish-in-Four Advising and assistance in developing a detailed curricular plan.

Undecided/Undeclared Students

Students who enter the University as freshmen or sophomores may be uncertain about which major they should choose and may not feel ready to declare their major or even to identify their interests with a particular school. Such students participate in the Undecided/Undeclared Advising Program which is administered by the Division of Undergraduate Education. This program is located in 256 Aldrich Hall; telephone (949) 824-6987. The goal of the Undecided/Undeclared Advising Program is to help students make the best informed and most rational choice of a major that is possible. All students at UCI are required to choose their major by the time they reach junior status.

To make a good decision about which major to declare, students should know the range of programs UCI offers and have some experience with them, have a good knowledge of their own abilities and interests, have clear educational goals, and have a sense of their vocational goals and of the academic programs at UCI that will provide appropriate preparation. Students in the Undecided/Undeclared Advising Program meet with faculty and receive quarterly individualized staff counseling that helps them explore the variety of course offerings on campus, become more aware of their own interests and abilities, formulate sound educational goals, and learn how to prepare for graduate education and/or possible careers.

To assist students in choosing a major, the program has created a required course designed to expose undecided/undeclared students to a variety of opportunities and resources available to them, and to introduce students to each of the schools and majors offered. In addition, students learn about research and career opportunities within different disciplines.

Courses in University Studies

University Studies 2 UCIMajors (2). A systematic exploration of UCI's undergraduate majors. Required of Undecided/Undeclared freshmen, but open to all freshmen as space permits.

University Studies 3 Mini-Seminars (1). Designed primarily for freshmen as an introduction to scholarly inquiry. Each section is taught by a faculty member from one of the academic disciplines and presents interesting and challenging topics representing the instructor's interest. Students participate in discussions, presentations, and projects. Some sections may be graded Pass/Not Pass only. May be taken for credit three times.

University Studies 4 Transfer Student Seminars (1). Designed primarily for transfer students during their first year at UCI. Each section is taught by a faculty member from one of the academic disciplines as an introduction to scholarly inquiry in their discipline. Students participate in discussions, presentations, and projects. Open to new students only; upper-division only until first week of classes. May be taken for credit two times.

University Studies 5 Freshman Seminar (2). Same description as University Studies 3.

University Studies 6 University Studies International Village Seminar (1). Seminars held in International Village that are specifically designed to either (a) introduce visiting international students to the U.S. and/or local area and institutions or (b) engage both international and U.S. students in discussion of topics of international interest.

University Studies 7 UTeach: Student-Taught Seminar (0). Student-taught seminar on selected topics. Topics vary each year according to the interest of the students teaching the classes. One unit of workload credit only. Pass/Not Pass only. May be taken for credit two times.

University Studies 40 Personal Success and Global Perspective (0). Furthers students' understanding of crucial personal and global issues and develops skills necessary for success in applying for prestigious scholarships and in graduate/professional studies. Seminar course with oral presentations, discussions, and written statements receiving particular emphasis. Two units of workload credit only. Prerequisites: minimum 3.7 GPA, sophomore standing; must submit writing sample and receive consent of instructor. Pass/Not Pass only.

University Studies 50 International Opportunities Program Study Abroad (12). Approved study at a foreign institution through the International Opportunities Program. To enroll, a student must submit a completed and approved International Study Advance Contract to the Center for International Education (CIE). Contact CIE for complete information. May be taken for credit four times.

University Studies 81 University Success (0). Survey of attitudes and skills necessary for University success. Designed primarily for new students who are first generation and/or low income students. Focus on specific tools and proven methods to improve academic performance. Two units of workload credit only. Open only to students in Transfer Summer Bridge Program or Freshmen Summer Bridge Program. Pass/Not Pass only. University Studies 81 and ICS 92 may not both be taken for credit.

University Studies 82 Computer Literacy (0). Survey of computer skills and tools necessary for University success. Designed primarily for new students who are first generation and/or low income students. Focus on specific tools and resources used widely in academic programs. Two units of workload credit only. Open only to students in Transfer Summer Bridge Program or Freshmen Summer Bridge Program. Pass/Not Pass only.

University Studies 108 Introduction to Research (4). Introduces new transfer students to research culture of the University. Students learn about the importance of research and creative activities as they are framed in a broad range of disciplines and are introduced to general research methods and approaches. Open only to students in Transfer Summer Bridge Program.

University Studies 175 Methods and Application in Small Group Instruction (4). Explores various theories and methods of learning and development and their practical application in small group settings. Peer tutors receive instruction in the design, implementation, and evaluation of an effective learning environment for undergraduate students. Prerequisite: employment as a tutor for the Learning and Academic Resource Center. Formerly University Studies 198.

University Studies 184 UC Center Sacramento Research Seminar (4). Develops an understanding of policy analysis and the policy and political process in California. Students write a research-based policy analysis on a topic related to their areas of academic interest and/or issues addressed at their internship sites in Sacramento. Corequisite: University Studies 185. Prerequisite: selected for UC Center Sacramento Program. May be taken for a total of eight units.

University Studies 185 UC Center Sacramento Internship (4 to 8). Supervised internship (24-40 hours per week) in Sacramento government, nonprofit, or private institution consistent with student's interest. Corequisite: University Studies 184. Prerequisite: selected for UC Center Sacramento Program. Pass/Not Pass only. May be taken for a total of 16 units. (IX)

University Studies 186 Sacramento Elective (4). Elective course offered by the UC Center Sacramento Program. Topics vary each quarter. Prerequisite: selected for UC Center Sacramento Program. May be taken for credit twice.

University Studies 190 Teaching Seminar: Theory and Practice (2). For students selected to be discussion leaders for University Studies 1 and 2. Models of teaching, developmental theory applied to college freshmen, curriculum development. Practice of teaching techniques and group management skills. May be taken for credit twice.

University Studies 192 Group Project for Discussion Leaders (4). For discussion leaders for University Studies 1 and 2. Weekly discussion group training for leading effective groups in addition to evaluations of weekly discussion sections and completion of a special project on issues of freshman development. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (IX)

University Studies 194 The Washington Seminar (4). Interdisciplinary seminar examines and explores unique aspects (e.g., governmental, cultural, political, the arts, historical, media related) of Washington, D.C. Core course mandatory for all participants in Washington D.C. Center Program. Prerequisite: selected for Washington D.C. Center Program. Same as Social Science 192.

University Studies 195 Washington D.C. Center Internship (4 to 8). Supervised internship (20-40 hours per week) in Washington, D.C. government, nonprofit, or private institution consistent with student's interest. Corequisite: University Studies 194. Prerequisite: selected for Washington D.C. Center Program. May be taken for a total of 16 units. (IX)

University Studies 197A UTeach Special Study (2). Students accepted to teach a UTeach course in spring quarter enroll in Special or Independent Study with their faculty mentor during the preceding fall quarter to develop their detailed course syllabus. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; must be accepted to UTeach Program.

University Studies 197B UTeach: Teaching Theory and Practice (2). Students accepted to teach a UTeach course in spring quarter enroll during the winter to develop their teaching skills in preparation for teaching the following quarter. Prerequisites: University Studies 197A or approved 199 class with faculty mentor; consent of instructor; must be accepted to UTeach Program. Pass/Not Pass only.

University Studies 197C UTeach: Teaching Practicum (2). Students selected to teach in the UTeach Program teach their courses and meet weekly in a seminar to continue to develop and enhance their teaching skills. Prerequisites: University Studies 197B; consent of instructor; must be accepted to UTeach Program. Pass/Not Pass only.

University Studies 197D Study Abroad Experiential Learning (1). Study abroad on an approved program and complete a critical reflection (written paper, blog, etc.) which must be submitted no later than the end of the quarter following the completion of the study abroad program. Enroll while studying abroad or the quarter immediately following return. Pass/Not Pass only. (IX)

First-Year Integrated Program (FIP)

University Studies 11-15 are three-quarter multidisciplinary sequences for freshmen only. These integrated courses are designed to introduce students to the ways different disciplines approach similar problems and to provide a freshman learning community experience. Successful completion of all three quarters will satisfy four courses toward partial fulfillment of different general education (GE) requirement categories. These courses are designed to have a capstone research writing component in the third quarter which will satisfy the second quarter of the lower-division writing requirement—one of the four courses toward partial fulfillment of GE categories. To satisfy the second quarter of the lower-division writing requirement with an FIP sequence, students must concurrently enroll in Writing 39B either the fall or winter quarter and pass it with a grade of C or better, and also complete the FIP sequence with a grade of C (or Pass) or better in the third quarter of the sequence.

NOTE: Undecided/Undecided students enrolling in an FIP sequence are not required to take University Studies 2.

University Studies 11A-B-C Persuasion and Social Change I, II, III (5-5-5) F, W, S. Introduces students to the history, theory, and practice of rhetoric: the art of persuasion. Rhetoric is the faculty of creating and analyzing effective communication in any medium, including speech, writing, visual arts, and others. The emphasis of this course is rhetoric for direct social change. Students read historical and contemporary texts about rhetoric and read and view noteworthy examples of rhetorical practice in a variety of forms: confessions, speeches, manifestos, films, and electronic texts. Students from any discipline will become critical consumers of rhetoric, learning how to recognize the tools of persuasion in everyday life, and will use rhetoric themselves for interpretation and research. The issue of effective speech will be approached from several different disciplines of the Humanities. Prerequisites: for 11A: satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement; for 11B: 11A and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C) or concurrent enrollment in Writing 39B; for 11C: 11B and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C). (One course toward category I-equivalent of Writing 39C, and three courses toward category IV.)

University Studies 12A-B-C Computer Games as Art, Culture, and Technology I, II, III (5-5-5) F, W, S. An introduction to the study of computer games as art objects, cultural artifacts, gateways to alternate realities, and complex software. Students learn vocabularies, perspectives, tools, and skills from multiple disciplines necessary to create and critique computer games. Exposure to contemporary art practices utilizing game metaphors, design principles, and technologies is emphasized. Students design and create games by programming and utilizing content creation software. Prerequisites: for 12A: satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement; for 12B: 12A and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C) or concurrent enrollment in Writing 39B; for 12C: 12B and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C). (One course toward category I-equivalent of Writing 39C, one course toward category III, one course toward category IV, and one course toward category V.)

University Studies 13A-B-C Environmental Studies I, II, III (5-5-5) F, W, S. Introduces students to the Earth as a system, the physical and biological resources on the planet, and the impact of humanity on those resources. Students become aware of the unique features of Earth that allowed the origin and evolution of life, the intrinsic values as well as the resource values of species and ecosystems, the extent of damage from historical and current overexploitation, efforts to restore endangered species and ecosystems, and the difficulties of reaching a sustainable relationship with the resources available in the face of increasing human population numbers compounded by increasing economic activity. Intended to help students become more informed citizens and decision makers, and will be ideal preparation for participation in relevant majors in the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Prerequisites: for 13A: satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement; for 13B: 13A and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C) or concurrent enrollment in Writing 39B; for 13C: 13B and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C). (One course toward category I-equivalent of Writing 39C, two courses toward category II, and one course toward category III.)

University Studies 14A-B-C Natural, Cultural, and Social Conditions of Music I, II, III (5-5-5) F, W, S. A multidisciplinary approach to the study of the complex phenomena of music focusing on thought processes, social organization, and understanding. The disciplines involved take a variety of perspectives including: music conceptualization, sociohistorical models of music, and empirical physical models and methods used to produce, propagate, and detect music. Prerequisites: for 14A: satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement; for 14B: 14A and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C) or concurrent enrollment in Writing 39B; for 14C: 14B and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C). (One course toward category I-equivalent of Writing 39C, one course toward category II, one course toward category III, and one course toward category VII.)

University Studies 15A-B-C Consciousness I, II, III (5-5-5) F, W, S. Introduces students to the theory of consciousness in the disciplines of cognitive science, philosophy, literature, psychoanalysis, and fine arts as represented in the genres of poetry, fiction, and film. Students are introduced to debates about the mind-body relationship and how it figures in discourse about the nature of consciousness. Students will become better skilled in analyzing scholarly works in the represented disciplines and genres, and in writing and revising analytic essays. Additionally, provides students with new concepts and vocabulary with which to understand their own experience of consciousness. Prerequisites: for 15A: satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement; for 15B: 15A and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C) or concurrent enrollment in Writing 39B; for 15C: 15B and completion of Writing 39B with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C). (One course toward category I-equivalent of Writing 39C, one course toward category III, and two courses toward category IV.)

Placement Testing

UCI's Academic Testing Center administers placement tests to new and continuing students to ensure correct placement in selected introductory courses and to help students assess their readiness for University-level work. These tests are selected or developed by UCI faculty who also determine the grading criteria for each test. Results from placement tests are used by students and their academic counselors to formulate a plan of study which is best suited to the students' learning needs and career goals and to determine enrollment in introductory courses. Additional information, such as entrance examination scores, Advanced Placement (AP) scores, and high school work, also may be used to determine course placement.

Placement tests are given in the areas of chemistry, physics, calculus, mathematical analysis, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Academic English/English as a Second Language.

   1.   Chemistry Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in an introductory chemistry course (Chemistry 1A or H2A) are required to take this test unless otherwise exempt.

   2.   Physics Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in an introductory physics course (Physics 2, 7A, or 7C) are required to take this test unless otherwise exempt.

   3.   Calculus Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in Mathematics 2A are required to take this test unless otherwise exempt.

   4.   Mathematical Analysis Test. Students who plan to enroll in Mathematics 1A or 1B, or who have not had a prior course in precalculus and who plan to enroll in mathematics courses at UCI are strongly encouraged to take this test.

   5.   Chinese Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in Chinese 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, or 3C are required to take this test. The score from this test and completion of a faculty oral interview will place students in the appropriate course.

   6.   French Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in French 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C, or 3A are recommended but not required to take this test unless otherwise exempt.

   7.   German Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in German 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C, or the 100 series are recommended but not required to take this test unless otherwise exempt.

   8.   Japanese Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in Japanese 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C, or 3A are required to take this test. The score from this test and completion of a faculty oral interview will place students in the appropriate course.

   9.   Korean Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in Korean 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, or 3C are required to take this test. The score from this test and completion of a faculty oral interview will place students in the appropriate course.

   10.   Spanish Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in Spanish 1A, 1AB, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2AB, 2BZ, 2MD, 2B, 2C, 3A, or 3B must take this test.

   11.   Vietnamese Placement Test. Students who plan to enroll in Vietnamese 1A, 1B, or 1C are required to take this test, unless otherwise exempt, followed by an oral interview. Students who plan to enroll in 2A, 2B, or 2C are required to take this test, unless otherwise exempt, followed by an oral interview.

   12.   Academic English (AE) Placement Test. This test is required of students (a) whose native language is not English, (b) whose scores on the Writing section of the SAT Reasoning Test fall below a set level, (c) who have not satisfied the UC Entry Level Writing requirement, and (d) who have received a letter from the AE/ESL Program requiring them to take the AE Placement Test. Scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of Standard Written English (TSWE) are not considered. The AE Placement Test also is required of students referred to the AE/ESL Program on the basis of their score on the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination. See the section on Admission of International Students for additional information.

All newly admitted freshmen will be directed to information about summer orientation, placement testing, and registering for courses. Participation in summer orientation and advising is required of new freshmen. Freshmen will register for their fall quarter courses at orientation. Students are strongly advised, therefore, to take any required placement tests before their orientation program. Students may consult the Academic Testing Center's Web site at http://www.testingcenter.uci.edu for further information on placement testing and summer testing dates.

The Academic Testing Center also administers other language tests for exemptions from general education categories VI and VIII, and is responsible for the campus-based administration of the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination.

Further information on placement and language testing may be obtained by calling (949) 824-6207 or by visiting the Center's Web site at http://www.testingcenter.uci.edu/. The Center is a unit of the Division of Undergraduate Education.

UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination

Results from the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination, formerly known as the Subject A Examination, are used to place students in UCI writing courses. There is a nonrefundable administrative fee associated with the examination. The fee payment process and waiver information are explained in materials students receive in April from Pearson's Government Solutions. Students who receive admission application fee waivers will automatically have this examination fee waived. Refer to the section on Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree for complete information on the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination and the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Learning and Academic Resource Center

The Learning and Academic Resource Center (LARC) is a campuswide academic support unit that provides programs designed to help students acquire the skills needed to develop intellectually, become successful learners, and achieve their academic and professional goals.

LARC staff and programs provide students with personal contact and support necessary for academic success on a large and diverse campus where students need to enroll in many large lecture courses. The Center works closely with faculty to develop programs that meet both curricular objectives and the changing needs of students. LARC programs stress the development of academic abilities that all university students need regardless of major: effective study strategies, critical reading, and analytical writing. Other programs focus on specific disciplines and offer stu

dents the opportunity to improve their academic skills in such areas as biology, chemistry, mathematics, humanities, social sciences, and computer sciences, among others.

The Center offers adjunct classes, workshops, individual counseling, small peer tutoring groups, and support in all forms of academic writing. Students may enroll in LARC programs by calling (949) 824-6451 to make appointments. Additional information including schedules for adjunct classes, workshops, and tutorials may be obtained online at http://www.larc.uci.edu/.

Student Academic Advancement Services

Student Academic Advancement Services (SAAS) provides individual counseling and academic support for students who are first-generation college students or low-income students, as well as disabled students (those with physical and/or learning disabilities). SAAS sponsors several major projects and a variety of workshops.

A primary responsibility of SAAS is to monitor the academic progress of its students. To best assist students who are having difficulty with their course work, professional counselors maintain a close liaison with academic departments. When needed, referrals to other campus support services are provided. In conjunction with these academic and service units, a variety of workshops are offered throughout the year by SAAS, as well as a graduate school preparatory course for those students whose career interests require graduate study.

SAAS also sponsors and conducts the Summer Bridge at UCI for underprepared students who demonstrate the potential to succeed at the University. Summer Bridge is designed to provide and refine basic academic skills necessary for students to successfully complete their course work during the regular school year.

Students are encouraged to make appointments with Student Academic Advancement Services; telephone (949) 824-6234. Additional information is available online at http://www.saas.uci.edu/.

Transfer Student Services

The primary role of the Transfer Student Services (TSS) program is to help transfer students quickly locate appropriate sources of advice and other services relevant to their educational and student life needs. Within TSS the Transfer Student Center and Lounge provides a comprehensive resource center for new and continuing transfer students. Transfer students have a "home away from home" at UC Irvine where they can take advantage of the assistance provided by the Transfer Services counselors and the transfer student mentors within the Keys to Transfer Success mentor program. The Transfer Student Center and Lounge is also the headquarters for the Tau Sigma National Honor Society for transfer students and the Transfer Student Organization (TSO). TSS counselors visit eight local community colleges to assist prospective transfer students with specialized academic and student life advising prior to their transfer to UC Irvine.

For more information, contact TSS, 2200 Student Services II, telephone (949) 824-1142; email: transfer@uci.edu; World Wide Web: http://www.transfercounseling.uci.edu.

Honors Opportunities

UCI offers many challenging and enriching honors opportunities to its most accomplished and motivated students. These include a comprehensive Campuswide Honors Program, which enrolls outstanding students from all majors from the freshman through senior years; a variety of major-specific honors programs at the upper-division level; the Humanities Honors Program, also offered at the upper-division level, but open to all majors on campus; and several Excellence in Research programs.

These programs offer some of the advantages usually associated with selective liberal arts colleges: rigorous, small, personalized classes and the intellectual exchange that creates a community of scholars. The difference, however, is that UCI's programs have the support and benefit of the resources of a major research university, including a renowned faculty, research opportunities, and the 34-million-volume University of California Library system (of which UCI Library collections number some 3.2 million volumes).

Honors students are also encouraged to participate in the UC Education Abroad Program, the International Opportunities Program, the UCDC Internship Programs, or the UC Center Sacramento Scholar Intern Program during their junior or senior year. Qualified students are also encouraged to take advantage of resources available in the Scholarship Opportunities Program (SOP) and the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP). These programs are described in other sections of this Catalogue.

Campuswide Honors Program

Founded in 1988, the Campuswide Honors Program (CHP) is available to selected high-achieving students in all academic majors from their freshman through senior years. It maintains an active roster of approximately 650 students. Many CHP students have continued their studies after graduation from UCI at the most prestigious graduate and professional schools in the country.

The CHP provides talented and successful UCI students with a special honors curriculum consisting of small, seminar-style classes, close interaction with peers, mentorship by UCI's top faculty, and the opportunity to participate in undergraduate research. Enhanced advising support provides students with assistance in applying for prestigious scholarships, internships, graduate and professional schools, and education abroad. Completion of the Campuswide Honors Program is noted on the student's transcript and baccalaureate diploma.

Admission. Admission to the program as an incoming UCI freshman is by invitation only; all eligible candidates are reviewed and selected by faculty representatives from each academic unit. Transfer and other students are eligible to apply for admission to the CHP up until the end of the first quarter of their junior year, if they have a minimum grade point average of 3.5. Qualified transfer students may also apply prior to matriculation. The CHP seeks to admit students who have a demonstrated passion for learning, a willingness to explore and take risks, and an interest in pursuing academic excellence in a range of disciplines outside of their major area.

Curriculum. CHP students pursue three, year-long interdisciplinary Honors core courses (one course per quarter), satisfying various categories of the general education requirement. Many of these courses provide an interdisciplinary approach to major subjects and issues. Faculty from a variety of disciplines are chosen especially for their teaching ability and scholarship. Participants pursue original research under the direct supervision of faculty members, culminating in the production of an honors thesis, creative project, or publication-quality paper. Many CHP students also participate in major-specific honors programs. The senior honors thesis that is developed and produced through these programs satisfies the CHP research and thesis requirement. Transfer students who have successfully completed an honors program in community college are not required to take an Honors Core course, but must complete research and the senior honors thesis or creative project.

Freshmen CHP students begin their course of study by taking honors sections of the Humanities Core Course (Humanities H1A-B-C). Team-taught by professors from various disciplines in the School of Humanities, the Humanities Core Course is organized around major themes. Faculty from a wide range of disciplines exemplify the ways in which humanists approach issues from philosophical, historical, and cultural perspectives. In small discussion sections, students put those perspectives into practice in their own writing and in classroom conversations and debates designed to engage each student intellectually.

The Critical Issues in the Social Sciences sequence (Social Sciences H1E-F-G or Social Ecology H20A-B-C), usually taken in the sophomore year, is team-taught by professors from the Schools of Social Sciences and Social Ecology. Topics have included human vision; authority (dis)obedience, and human society; decisions and compromises and their rewards and penalties; human language and its disablement; and exotic societies (including our own).

The Idiom and Practice of Science interdisciplinary sequence (Chemistry H90, Earth System Science H90, Physics H90) explores the role science plays in addressing socially significant problems. Students develop the ability to understand scientific models and to judge the content, merit, and limitations of many issues of science in the modern world. The development of analytical and writing skills is emphasized. Topics have included earthquakes, chemistry in the environment, radiation/radioactivity, evolution/aging, the mathematics of power, biodiversity/conservation, genetic plant engineering, the physics of music, and calculus.

CHP students are eligible to participate in other lower-division Honors courses on the campus, along with other qualified students. These include the following courses:

Honors General Chemistry covers the same material as Chemistry 1A-B-C, but in greater depth. Honors General Chemistry Laboratory is also offered. The small class size enhances access to outstanding faculty and peers.

Honors Organic Chemistry, designed for Chemistry and Biology majors and anyone else interested in a research career, offers a smaller class size and the opportunity for interactions and experiences not possible in the larger Chemistry 51 series. It is usually taken in the sophomore year, after completion of the General Chemistry lecture and laboratory sequence.

Honors Calculus, especially recommended for prospective Mathematics majors and others with a particular interest in mathematics, covers the same material as Mathematics 2D-E, but with greater emphasis on the theoretical structure of the subject matter.

The Honors Introduction to Computer Science sequence (ICS H21, H22, H23) is open to CHP students majoring in Information and Computer Science and other students by consent. The first course introduces basic concepts, fundamental laws and principles of software and hardware organization, program construction, applications, and policy and social issues. The second course covers in-depth concepts of programming and mathematical tools for analyzing programs. The third builds on this background with respect to mathematical tools and analysis.

Extracurricular Activities. CHP students are invited to participate in many social and cultural activities, including weekly special programs and socials, beach bonfires, poetry readings, faculty lectures, movie nights, trips to museums, concerts and plays, and a camping retreat. Honors students also produce a quarterly creative writing and arts journal, and continuing Honors students may volunteer for the Peer Mentor Program, providing assistance to incoming Honors students.

On-Campus Housing. CHP students are guaranteed on-campus housing, as long as they meet the Housing procedures and deadlines and remain in good standing with the honors program. Freshmen may choose to live in Middle Earth in "The Shire," or in Mesa Court in "Loma" or "Arroyo." Sophomores and upper-division students who wish to live in Honors housing may also select one of the Honors houses in Arroyo Vista. Other non-honors housing is available in Greek or other theme houses in Arroya Vista, and in apartment-style living in Campus Village or Vista del Campo. Honors housing offers a valuable living/learning experience with other Honors students and the community spirit that is a special feature of the CHP. Students bring to the living experience their vitality, creativity, and dynamic dedication to learning. Activities have included get-togethers with Honors faculty, staff, and students; international potlucks; off-campus retreats; study breaks; and other events such as workshops and special speakers geared toward the interests of the residents.

Other benefits include extended library borrowing privileges, honors study rooms in the Langson and Science Libraries, leadership and service opportunities, honors academic advising services with faculty, honors advisors and peer counselors, and close interaction with faculty and peers.

Additional information is available from the Campuswide Honors Program,1200 Student Services II; (949) 824-5461; honors@uci.edu; http://www.honors.uci.edu/.

Major-Specific and School Honors Programs

Honors programs for qualified junior- and senior-level students also are available to Drama majors and Music Theatre majors in the Claire Trevor School of the Arts; to all majors in the School of Biological Sciences; to students from all schools regardless of their majors, through the School of Humanities; to Asian American Studies majors in the School of Humanities; to all majors in the School of Physical Sciences; to all majors in the School of Social Sciences; to all majors in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences; and to all majors in the School of Social Ecology. The focal point of each of these programs is the development of analytical and research skills through the pursuit of research under faculty supervision. An honors-level thesis/creative project is required by most of the programs. CHP students are encouraged to participate in these programs as well as the Campuswide Honors Program. The honors-level thesis/creative project that is developed and produced through these programs also satisfies the CHP research and thesis requirement. Additional information is available in the specific academic unit sections of this Catalogue.

Excellence in Research Programs

The School of Biological Sciences and the Departments of Cognitive Sciences and of Psychology and Social Behavior offer students the opportunity to pursue research through their Excellence in Research Programs. Students work on their research projects under faculty supervision and have the opportunity to present their results to peers and faculty and, in certain instances, to have their research papers published. Additional information is available in the specific academic unit sections of this Catalogue.

Honors Recognition

Students who graduate during the academic year with academic honors, and those who receive special school awards, are honored in school-based ceremonies. Some Honors societies may also hold special ceremonies for selected students. Of the graduating seniors, no more than 12 percent will receive academic honors: approximately 1 percent summa cum laude, 3 percent magna cum laude, and 8 percent cum laude. The criteria used in selecting candidates for these honors are available at the counseling office of each school. One general criterion is that students must have completed at least 72 quarter units in residence at a University of California campus. The student's cumulative record at the end of the final quarter is the basis for consideration for awarding Latin Honors. Students who have on file recorded acts of academic dishonesty, as

defined in University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students, may be excluded by the Associate Deans from consideration for academic honors at graduation. For further information contact the academic counseling office of each school.

Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa founded in 1776, is the oldest and most respected undergraduate honors organization in the United States. It supports and recognizes academic excellence and scholarly achievement in the liberal arts and sciences, and promotes the principles of freedom of inquiry and liberty of thought and expression. UC Irvine's Phi Beta Kappa Chapter (Mu of California) was founded in 1974. Phi Beta Kappa is UCI's most selective honorary society, with only 5 percent of graduating seniors and 1 percent of juniors invited to become members each year. An annual initiation ceremony for new members is held in June. For additional information, including selection criteria, visit http://www.phibetakappa.uci.edu/.

Scholarship Opportunities Program

UCI encourages high-achieving students to learn how they can compete successfully for the most prestigious scholarships, grants, and graduate fellowships available, and to begin learning about the process as early as possible. The Scholarship Opportunities Program (SOP) organizes and disseminates information about these awards. It also facilitates the campus review process for many of them, provides individual and group counseling, presents workshops, assists students with curriculum vitae, and provides guidance on statements of purpose and project proposals.

Winner Tips. SOP staff help connect students with past UCI scholarship winners, who can share their experiences about the process and insider tips on becoming a successful candidate.

Comprehensive Workshops. SOP's two-day annual Merit Scholarships seminars present practical information and tips on applying for prestigious scholarships as well as firsthand experience from past UCI student winners and faculty. Additionally, the staff presents workshops in response to requests from academic units, clubs, and other campus groups.

Individual and Group Scholarship Counseling is available by appointment.

Resource Materials. The SOP office maintains a library of past scholarship winners' applications; descriptions and selection process information for merit scholarships; examples of successful CVs, recommendation letters, Statements of Purpose, and research and project proposals; books on interview preparation; and videotapes of previous winners.

SOP Services. The names and photos of students who have been awarded the prestigious national and regional scholarships and fellowships are featured on the SOP Web site at http://www.scholars.uci.edu. Plaques bearing the names of winners are displayed in the Student Center outside the entrance to the Crystal Cove Auditorium. Additional information is available in the SOP office, 1200 Student Services II; (949) 824-5461; rharris@uci.edu or sklrship@uci.edu.

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), in the Division of Undergraduate Education, encourages and facilitates research and creative activities by undergraduates. Research opportunities are available not only from every discipline, interdisciplinary program, and school, but also from many outside agencies, including national laboratories, industrial partners, and other universities. UROP offers assistance to students and faculty through all phases of the research activity: proposal writing, developing research plans, resource support, conducting the research and analyzing data, and presenting results of the research at the annual spring UCI Undergraduate Research Symposium. Calls for proposals are issued in the fall and spring quarters. Projects supported by UROP may be done at any time during the academic year and/or summer, and the research performed must meet established academic standards and emphasize interaction between the student and the faculty supervisor. In addition, all students participating in faculty-guided research activities are welcome to submit their research papers for faculty review and possible publication in the annual UCI Undergraduate Research Journal.

UROP also sponsors the following programs.

The Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) provides funding for UCI undergraduates from all disciplines who are conducting summer research projects or creative activities under the guidance of UCI faculty members. The program offers students the opportunity to become immersed in a research topic for a full-time 10-week period or the equivalent of 400 hours. SURP is open to all non-graduating UCI undergraduates who are in good academic standing and who have been involved in a faculty-mentored research project or creative activity for at least one quarter.

The Inter-Disciplinary Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (ID-SURE) provides funding for continuing UCI undergraduates from all disciplines who are conducting interdisciplinary summer research projects or creative activities related to health promotion and disease prevention under the guidance of UCI faculty members. Students work on their projects full-time for eight weeks.

The Integrated Micro/Nano Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (IM-SURE) provides an opportunity for non-graduating science and engineering juniors and seniors to become immersed in biomedical, physical, and engineering micro/nanotechnology research projects under the guidance of UCI faculty members. Students work on their projects for 10 weeks.

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in Information Technology (SURF-IT) provides the opportunity for non-graduating UCI juniors and seniors to become involved in information technology-related research under the guidance of UCI faculty members. Students work on their projects full-time for 10 weeks.

The Chemistry Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (Chem-SURF) provides an opportunity for non-graduating science juniors and seniors to become immersed in cutting-edge research projects in the fields of chemical biology, chemical physics, and analytical atmospheric, bioinorganic, bioorganic, computational, inorganic, materials, organic, physical, polymer, surface, and theoretical chemistry under the guidance of UCI faculty members. Students work on their projects for 10 weeks.

For more information about UROP and complete details about any of the programs it sponsors, contact UROP, 2300 Student Services II; telephone (949) 824-4189; fax (949) 824-1607; urop@uci.edu; http://www.urop.uci.edu/.

UCDC Academic Internship Program

The UCDC Academic Internship Program supervises and supports students who pursue internships, elective courses, research, and creative activities in the nation's capital. This UC systemwide program, situated in the exciting environment of Washington, D.C., is open to students in all

majors. Students may enroll for fall, winter, or spring quarter. While living in Washington, D.C., students are enrolled at UCI and earn 12-16 units of credit. Financial-aid eligibility is maintained. Students who meet financial need and other eligibility criteria are also considered for a President's Washington Scholarship to help cover costs associated with participation in the program.

Students live in the new Washington, D.C. Center building together with students from all of the participating UC campuses, which provides a social and intellectual community throughout the quarter. The Program also offers a unique opportunity for UCI faculty members and graduate students to teach and pursue research in the Washington, D.C. area.

Interested students with strong academic records are encouraged to apply; visit 1100 Student Services II; (949) 824-5400; dccenter@uci.edu; http://www.dccenter.uci.edu/.

UC Center Sacramento Scholar Intern Program

The UC Center Sacramento (UCCS) Scholar Intern Program supervises and supports students who pursue internships, elective courses, research, and creative activities in the state capital. This UC systemwide program is open to students in all majors, and is currently available for the fall, winter, spring, or summer terms. While living in Sacramento, students are enrolled at UCI and earn 12-16 units of credit. Financial aid eligibility is maintained. Internship opportunities are available for students in many different settings including the offices of Assembly Members, Senators, and the Governor, as well as with State agencies, nonprofit organizations, and lobbying organizations.

Interested students with strong academic records are encouraged to apply; visit 1100 Student Services II; telephone (949) 824-5400; dccenter@uci.edu; http://uccs.universityofcalifornia.edu/.

Teaching, Learning & Technology Center

The Teaching, Learning & Technology Center (TLTC), a unit of the Division of Undergraduate Education, provides instructional support through a variety of services and programs to the UCI teaching community. This support includes teaching development, skills training, and instructional technology assistance.

Teaching development includes consultation with teaching professionals regarding instructional strategies, methods, and learning theory. Faculty members and Teaching Assistants (TAs) may request consultations, and all services are free and confidential. Consultation can be further enhanced by videotaping the teacher in the classroom. Additionally, instructors can access a midterm feedback form through the Electronic Educational Environment's "Instructors' Toolbox" (http://www.eee.uci.edu/) in order to obtain feedback from students before the end of the term. To schedule an appointment for a consultation or other service, call TLTC at (949) 824-1150.

Other programs and services include the Pedagogical Fellows Program; a two-day TA Professional Development Program during Welcome Week; quarterly Teaching Colloquies; workshops specifically for new faculty, experienced faculty, and graduate students; and workshops and individual assistance with the compilation of Teaching Portfolios. TLTC also co-hosts the annual "Celebration of Teaching" which honors teaching excellence and innovations.

TLTC provides services related to computerized presentation technology, video-conferencing, distance learning, and video and multimedia production. TLTC hosts a video teleconference center for distance learning and a media center where instructors can produce multimedia resources for their courses. Technicians and instructional specialists are available to advise instructors. Additionally, TLTC has an experimental training room called the Learning Studio (Anteater Instruction and Research Building, room 1030) which is equipped with both Mac and PC computers, four screens that display four different images, as well as Wacom Boards. To book the rooms for courses and/or events that require additional media, call (949) 824-1150.

TLTC is located in the Anteater Instruction and Research Building on the corner of East Peltason and Anteater Drives, third floor, room 3000. Hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Staff is available after hours and on weekends by special appointment. For general information, call (949) 824-1150 or visit http://www.tltc.uci.edu/.

TLTC offers the following courses:

University Studies 390A-B-C Advanced Pedagogy and Academic Job Preparation (variable units). Service learning course for graduate students who serve as teaching mentors for other TAs. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: must have a concurrent appointment as a Pedagogical Fellow with TLTC.

390A (2 to 4). Introduction to principles of good course design and instructional development. Students design and implement an integrated curriculum in the context of the fall TA Professional Development Program.

390B (2 to 4). Introduction to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning literature within the students' respective disciplines. Students select or create several teaching methods stated or implied by the literature and translate these findings into workshops for other TAs.

390C (2 to 4). Prepares students for their future roles as faculty members and the academic job search. Covers job search skills; creation of CV, cover letters, statement of teaching philosophy; job interview and negotiation skills; types of higher educational institutions and professorial responsibilities.

Classroom Technology Support

The Classroom Technology Support unit supports excellence in undergraduate teaching and learning by providing instructional equipment and related services for faculty teaching in the General Assignment Classrooms. For information, call (949) 824-5128; http://www.classrooms.uci.edu.

Center for International Education

The Center for International Education (CIE) includes the Education Abroad Program (EAP) and the International Opportunities Program (IOP). CIE is a comprehensive resource and counseling center which helps students take advantage of the many worldwide opportunities that exist for study, work, internship, volunteering, research, and non-credentialed teaching which relates to their degree programs at UCI.

Studying abroad is an important resource for achieving the skills, knowledge, and understanding that will make today's undergraduates effective citizens and leaders in local, national, and global affairs once they depart the University. In today's political and business environment, college graduates must be informed decision-makers with a capacity to reflect on their own values while understanding the complex identities, histories, and cultures of others. Studying abroad provides students with the language skills and cultural competence necessary to meet the current demands of business, government, and educational institutions.

Professional staff and international peer advisors, who have returned from an IOP or EAP experience, are available to guide students in making appropriate choices of international programs for their educational goals. Group and individual advising is available every day that UCI is in session. All EAP and IOP participants are provided with pre-departure and reentry orientations.

CIE, EAP, and IOP are located in 1100 Student Services II; (949) 824-6343; cie@uci.edu; http://www.cie.uci.edu/.

EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM

The Education Abroad Program (EAP) of the University of California offers students the opportunity to experience a different culture while making progress toward degree objectives. EAP is an overseas study program which operates in cooperation with about 150 host universities and colleges in 35 countries throughout the world. Programs are available for students in every major. The wide variety of programs includes those offering general curriculum, intensive language study, and programs focusing on a specific academic subject area. Participation in EAP satisfies category VIII and can satisfy category IX of the UCI general education requirement. A summary of EAP opportunities is shown in the accompanying chart.

Students are advised to plan early in their academic career in order to best match studying abroad with their major to graduate on time. Preliminary guidance is available at the EAP Academic Planning Web site (http://www.cie.uci.edu/academics/academicplanning.html).

The cost of studying abroad through EAP is often comparable to the cost of studying at UCI. Participants pay the same education and registration fees normally paid for a similar period at UCI, plus room, board, books, round-trip transportation, on-site orientation, intensive language program expenses (when applicable), and any other personal expenses. All UC financial aid (other than work-study), including grants, scholarships, and loans, is available to EAP students who qualify. Both need-based and merit-based scholarships specifically for study abroad are also available. Information is available at http://www.cie.uci.edu/finaid.html.

On-site abroad, a UC professor frequently serves as the EAP Study Center Director. The Study Center Director oversees local operations, including in-country orientation, student academic advising and grade assessment, and serves as UC's liaison to the host institution. In some countries, the duties of a Student Center Director are performed by a local faculty liaison officer or administrative coordinator. Students interested in EAP should visit the Web site (http://eap.ucop.edu/) to review program options and visit the CIE Web site (http://www.cie.uci.edu), or come to the CIE office for advising and to obtain an application. UCI EAP deadlines are available at http://www.cie.uci.edu/DeadlinesByCountry.html.

2009-10 UC EAP Summary of Opportunities

Country

Terms of Participation

Language of Instruction

Australia*

F, S, Year

English

Barbados

F, Year

English

Brazil*

F, S, Year

Portuguese, English

Canada

F, Year

English

Chile*

F, S, Year

Spanish

China

Summer, F, S, Year

Standard Chinese, English

Costa Rica*

F, S

Spanish, English

Denmark

Summer, F, Year

English, Danish

Egypt

Year

English

France

Summer, F, S, Year

French, English

Germany

F, S, Year

German, English

Ghana

F, S, Year

English

Hong Kong

F, S, Year

English, Cantonese, Putonghua

Hungary

F, S, Year

English

India

F

English

Ireland

Year

English

Italy

Summer, F, S, Year

Italian, English

Japan

F, S, Year

English, Japanese

Republic of Korea

Summer, F, S, Year

English, Korean

Mexico

Summer, F, S, Year

Spanish

Netherlands

F, S, Year

English, Dutch

New Zealand*

S, Year

English

Russia

F

Russian

Singapore

F, S, Year

English

South Africa*

F, S, Year

English

Spain

Summer, F, S, Year

Spanish, Catalan

Sweden

Summer, F, Year

English, Swedish

Taiwan

F, S, Year

Standard Chinese, English

Thailand

Summer, F, S, Year

English

Turkey

F, S, Year

English

United Kingdom

Summer, F, S, Year

English

Vietnam

F

English

*The academic year begins in January or February instead of in the fall.

NOTE: Information may be subject to change. Updates and program details are available at http://eap.ucop.edu. Programs in Israel and the Philippines are currently on hold.

INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM

UCI's International Opportunities Program (IOP) is the link between UCI students and any international educational experience that occurs outside the boundaries of the U.S. and is not a part of the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) nor the UCI Summer Session Travel-Study program. Any UCI student (undergraduate, graduating senior, or graduate) in good academic standing, regardless of major, class level, or foreign language ability, may participate in IOP.

CIE staff provide information and counseling to assist students in finding an appropriate program to meet their needs and interests. Students may choose from academic study (with transferable credit), paid work, paid or unpaid internships, unpaid or compensated volunteer service, field research, and paid teaching opportunities in nearly every country in the world. This includes all academic programs sponsored by U.S. institutions that occur on foreign soil or water (as in the case of the Semester at Sea program), direct enrollment at foreign institutions, summer session abroad programs through other UC campuses, and study abroad programs offered by private providers.

With careful planning IOP students participating in study programs can make progress toward their UCI degree by fulfilling major, minor, or general education requirements. Students may apply for transfer credit and UCI financial aid by completing the IOP Credit Contract. Many scholarships are also available.

To acquaint students with opportunities abroad, IOP sponsors the annual Go Abroad Fair and periodic informational presentations. CIE also maintains a listing of opportunities abroad on its Web site. Interested students should visit http://www.cie.uci.edu/ or come into the CIE office for assistance.