PROGRAM IN PUBLIC HEALTH

The Program in Public Health was established in 2003 to provide institutional focus for existing academic strengths in various sub-disciplines of public health and to facilitate well-grounded education and innovative research in emerging cross-disciplinary topics in the field. Undergraduate degree programs in public health began enrolling students in 2006, and the Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention was established in 2007 to advance the collaborative interdisciplinary mission of public health research and education. The Department offers a B.S. in Public Health Sciences, a B.A. in Public Health Policy, a minor in Public Health, and a Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) in three emphases: Environmental Health, Epidemiology, and Sociocultural Diversity and Health. Information regarding the Program in Public Health's future plans is available at http://publichealth.uci.edu/.

DEPARTMENT OF POPULATION HEALTH AND DISEASE PREVENTION

http://publichealth.uci.edu/
 Oladele Ogunseitan, Department Chair

Undergraduate Program
Graduate Program
Courses

Faculty

Alpesh Amin, M.D., M.B.A. Northwestern University, Interim Chair, Department of Medicine; Executive Director, Hospitalist Program; Chief, Division of General Internal Medicine; and Professor of Clinical Medicine, Department of Medicine (Hospitalist Program and General Internal Medicine) and Program in Public Health

Scott M. Bartell, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Assistant Professor of Public Health

Hans-Ulrich Bernard, Ph.D. University Göttingen, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry and of Public Health

Zuzana Bic, Dr.P.H. Loma Linda University, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment, Public Health

Tim-Allen Bruckner, Ph,D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Public Health and of Planning, Policy, and Design

Ralph W. Cygan, M.D. State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Health Sciences Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine (General Internal Medicine) and Program in Public Health

Rufus Edwards, Ph.D. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Assistant Professor of Public Health

Chad P. Garner, Ph.D. Oxford University, Associate Professor and Associate Professor in Residence of Epidemiology and Public Health

Lisa Grant Ludwig, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Associate Professor of Public Health

F. Allan Hubbell, M.D., M.S.P.H. Baylor University College of Medicine, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, School of Medicine, and Professor, Department of Medicine (General Internal Medicine) and Program in Public Health

Cynthia Lakon, Ph.D. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Assistant Professor of Public Health

Shahram Lotfipour, M.D. University of Iowa, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine and Program in Public Health

Frank L. Meyskens, Jr., M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Director of the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Professor, Departments of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology), Biological Chemistry, and Program in Public Health; and Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr. Endowed Chair

Michael J. Montoya, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Chicano/Latino Studies, and Public Health

Andrew Noymer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Public Health

Oladele Ogunseitan, Ph.D. University of Tennessee, Department Chair of Population Health and Disease Prevention and Professor of Public Health and of Environmental Health, Science, and Policy

Sharon Stern, Ph.D. University of Utah, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment, Public Health

Daniel Stokols, Ph.D. University of North Carolina, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Psychology and Social Behavior; Public Health; and Environmental Health, Science, and Policy

Roberto Tapia-Conyer, M.D., M.P.H., M.Sc., Dr.Sc. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Adjunct Professor of Public Health

David Timberlake, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Epidemiology

Lari Wenzel, Ph.D. Arizona State University, Professor of Medicine (General Internal Medicine) and Public Health

Jun Wu, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Epidemiology

Guiyun Yan, Ph.D. University of Vermont, Professor of Public Health and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The mission of the Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention is to use interdisciplinary approaches in research, education, and community outreach for creating, integrating, and translating population-based knowledge into preventive strategies to reduce the societal burden of human disease and disability. This is a forward-thinking mission that acknowledges and complements, but does not compete with, traditional discipline-based research and training in public health. It is a specific mission that is increasingly recognized by eminent organizations such as the Institute of Medicine's Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice (formerly known as the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention [HPDP]), by research and education funding institutions such as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Health & Society Scholars Program, and by distinguished Schools of Public Health.

New sources of funding for research and education are emerging, including the translational science initiative of the National Institutes of Health, to support this ecological model of public health. The societal challenges facing health care and the burden of diseases at the national and international levels have increased the demand for experts capable of researching, developing, and implementing programs to prevent disease and to improve population health. The Department aims to host activities that bridge disciplinary perspectives, methods, and practices to nurture new leaders in public health.

DEGREES

Public Health Policy

B.A.

Public Health Sciences

B.S.

Public Health
(with emphases in Environmental Health; Epidemiology; and Sociocultural Diversity and Health)

M.P.H.

HONORS

Honors at graduation, e.g., cum laude, magna cum laude, summa cum laude, are awarded to about 12 percent of the graduating seniors. Eligibility for such honors will be on the basis of grade point average (GPA). A minimum overall GPA of 3.5 is required for consideration. Students must have completed at least 72 units in residence at a University of California campus by the end of the final quarter prior to graduation. The student's cumulative record at the end of the final quarter is the basis for consideration for awarding Latin honors. Other important factors are considered (See "Honors Recognition" in the Honors Opportunities information in the Division of Undergraduate Education section).

Undergraduate Program

The B.S. in Public Health Sciences and the B.A. in Public Health Policy degree programs train students in multidisciplinary approaches to public health practice and research. The degrees explore both quantitative and qualitative aspects of public health at all levels of analysis. Graduates will advance, through selective employment or further education, to become the new generation of public health professionals prepared to face the emerging challenges to human health from a population perspective using cutting-edge prevention approaches.

Students who are interested in pursuing a premedical program should note that additional courses will be needed beyond the requirements of the public health degrees to fulfill requirements for medical school.

Students considering the public health degrees should carefully evaluate their academic preparation and career goals before enrolling in either the B.S. or B.A. degree program. Changing from one degree program to the other is possible, but will require completion of the required lower- and upper-division courses specified for each program. It is also possible for a student to enroll in both the B.S. and B.A. degree programs (double major), provided the student completes all the requirements outlined under each degree.

The Department also offers an undergraduate minor.

CAREERS FOR THE MAJORS

For graduates with bachelor's degrees who wish to enter the job market directly, there is a plethora of opportunities in private agencies and public organizations for entry-level personnel in public health. These include statewide and regional health care agencies (e.g., the Orange County Health Care Agency), community clinics focusing on preventive health, water and air quality management districts, biomedical companies, health-education institutions, and activist non-governmental organizations. The National Association of County and City Health Officials (http://www.naccho.org) has produced a compendium of public health career paths, many of which have become even more compelling for graduates at the bachelor's level.

In addition to supplying practitioners for the entry-level workforce in public health, the undergraduate degrees will also prepare students to enter graduate programs in public health. Information about public health careers can be obtained through the Council on Education for Public Health (http://www.ceph.org) and the Association of Schools of Public Health (http://www.whatispublichealth.org).

PRACTICUM

A major part of the undergraduate curriculum in Public Health is its practicum requirement. Practicum is designed to facilitate hands-on experience for public health majors at agencies and/or laboratories dedicated to public health practice while also linking tutorials on the development of excellent writing and communication skills on contemporary public health topics. Students select an approved practicum placement site on- or off- campus, depending on their declared concentration area. Unlisted or inappropriate placements, as well as those that could give the appearance of nepotism or preferential treatment, will not be approved. Approval for practicum will be determined by the Practicum Director.

Practicum is open only to upper-division Public Health students who are in good academic standing and have completed all prerequisite course work. Practicum must be taken for a letter grade. Further information, including practicum sign-up procedures and prerequisites can be obtained at http://publichealth.uci.edu/.

ADMISSION TO THE MAJORS

Freshmen: There are no specific requirements for admission at the freshman level, however completion of a college preparatory high school curriculum including two years of high school biology, a combination of natural science courses including one year each of mathematics and chemistry, and courses in health science and social sciences will be helpful. Grades of B or better are recommended in all these preparatory courses.

Transfer students: Junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall and who satisfactorily complete lower-division requirements will be given preference for admission to the Public Health majors. All applicants to the B.S. degree in Public Health Sciences must have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in required courses, and must complete one year of general biology and one year of general chemistry with laboratory, and one year of courses equivalent to UCI's Biological Sciences 93 and 97. All applicants to the B.A. degree in Public Health Policy must have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in required courses, and complete one year of courses in anthropology, economics, sociology, and/or psychology.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES

University Requirements: See pages 55-62.

School Requirements: None

Major Requirements

A.   Lower-Division Requirements: Public Health 1 and 2; Chemistry 1A-B-C and 1LB-LC, 51A-B-C and 51LA-LB; Biological Sciences 93, 94, 97, 98, 99; Mathematics 2A-B plus Mathematics 7, Statistics 7, or Statistics 8; three Social and Behavioral Science courses, with at least two in the same discipline selected from the following:

Psychology: Psychology and Social Behavior 9, 11A, 11B, 11C, or Psychology 7A, 9A, 9B, 9C (these courses are cross-listed)
Sociology 1, 2, 3
Economics 1, 13, 20A, 20B
Anthropology 2A, 2B, 2C

Political Science 6C, 31A, 51A
Environmental Analysis and Design E8

B.   Upper-Division Requirements: Public Health 101; two courses from Biological Sciences D103, D104, E109, N110; five additional upper-division courses chosen from two topic areas with at least one course in either topic area:

Epidemiology and Genetics: Biological Sciences D137, D148*, D153*, D187*, E106, M123*, M137; Public Health 102-119.

   Environmental and Global Health Sciences: Anthropology 125B, 128B; Biological Sciences E189, 191A-B*, 191C*; Chemistry 125; Environmental Analysis and Design E127; Earth System Science 112*; Public Health 160-179.

   Infectious Diseases: Public Health 180-189; Biological Sciences 100L*, 124, D143, E136*, E176, M114, M114L*, M116*, M116L*, M118L*, M121*, M121L*, M122, M122L*, M124A-B*, M125, M137.
*Note additional prerequisites.

   Public Health 100 may also be taken to fulfill upper-division course work.

C.   Practicum Requirement: Public Health 195 (8 units), taken for upper-division writing credit.

NOTE: Students may not double major in Public Health Sciences and Pharmaceutical Sciences, or with any of the School of Biological Sciences majors or minors.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE IN PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY

University Requirements: See pages 55-62.

School Requirements: None

Major Requirements

A.   Lower-Division Requirements: Public Health 1 and 2; three courses from Biological Sciences 9A, 9D, 9J, 10, 12B, 12D, 25, 30, 45, 50, 93, 94; Mathematics 2A-B plus Mathematics 7, Statistics 7, or Statistics 8; three Social and Behavioral Science courses, with at least two in the same discipline selected from the following:

Psychology: Psychology and Social Behavior 9, 11A, 11B, 11C, or Psychology 7A, 9A, 9B, 9C (these courses are cross-listed)
Sociology 1, 2, 3
Economics 1, 13, 20A, 20B
Anthropology 2A, 2B, 2C
Political Science 6C, 31A, 51A
Environmental Analysis and Design E8

B.   Upper-Division Requirements: Public Health 101, 122, and 144; seven additional upper-division courses with at least two courses in each topic area selected from the following:

   Health Policy and Management: Criminology, Law and Society C121, C126, C148; Economics 123A-B-C*, 124A*; Management 101*, 107**, 160*; Planning, Policy, and Design 102, 111, 133*, 137, 167, 168, 169*, Political Science 171A*; Public Health 120-139.

   Social and Behavioral Health Sciences: Anthropology 133A, 134A, 134D, 134E; Planning, Policy, and Design 112, 151; Psychology and Social Behavior 101D, 102C, 103H, 110D, 111D, 112D, 113D, 114D, 116D, 117D, 136H, 137H, 138H, 151C, 152C, 153C*, 154C*, 155C*, 178S*; Public Health 140-159.

*Note additional prerequisites.

**Open only to students enrolled in the Management minor or with consent of instructor.

   Public Health 100 may also be taken to fulfill upper-division course work.

C.   Practicum Requirement: Public Health 195 (8 units), taken for upper-division writing credit.

MINOR IN PUBLIC HEALTH

The minor in Public Health provides students with the fundamental knowledge of principles, applications, and skills needed to develop a firm appreciation of health and disease prevention at the population level, and to use this special knowledge to transform the experience of their major education into innovative approaches for solving problems in health care and assessment.

Teaching and learning. Public Health education demands interdisciplinary engagement. The minor curriculum is intended to engage students from majors across the campus by introducing them to the main concepts and branches of public health, while also giving them the skills and values needed to translate their major education into meaningful projects in population health assessment and disease prevention. In concert with the major degrees in public health, the minor emphasizes learning through the ecological model of public health where the linkages and relationships among multiple determinants affecting health are examined to identify critical nodes of opportunities to improve the health of populations at various scales of analysis.

Research. Public Health education is most firmly embedded in knowledge systems through research and practice. The minor curriculum requires a period of directed or special studies where students have the opportunity to translate their didactic knowledge into tangible projects within the rubric of public health practice.

Service. Public Health education also demands community engagement. All students of Public Health are encouraged to incorporate public health impacts and benefit assessments into societal functions that ground their understanding of public problems. Experience in public health service may be acquired through participation in learning opportunities and by reflecting critically on those experiences under the auspices of vigorous campus organizations such as the Public Health Association (http://pha.zotters.org/).

Requirements for the Minor

Nine courses are required (36 units), no more than two of which may be taken on a Pass/Not Pass basis, distributed as follows:

A.   Public Health 1 and 2.

B.   Six upper-division courses in Public Health with at least one from each of four subject-cluster areas as follows:

   Epidemiology and Genetics (Public Health 101-119)
Health Policy and Management (Public Health 120-139)
Social and Behavioral Health Science (Public Health 140-159)
Environmental and Global Health Science (Public Health 160-179)
Infectious Diseases (Public Health180-189)

C.   Four units of Public Health 198 (Directed Studies) or Public Health 199 (Special Studies) or equivalent, working on topics demonstrably related to public health research and/or practice.

The courses selected to fulfill this requirement must have Public Health number designations. Petitions to use alternative courses will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

No more than two courses may overlap between the student's major degree and the minor in Public Health.

Residence Requirement: A minimum of six courses required for the minor must be completed at UCI. Approved courses taken in the Education Abroad Program are considered to be in-residence courses.

Graduate Program

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH

The distinctive mission of the UCI M.P.H. program is to create a motivated cadre of public health professionals who are prepared to implement effective strategies for reducing the burden of disease and disability in culturally diverse communities, and who are primed to draw from their broad training in the global dimensions of public health principles to lead and work collaboratively on precise assessments of health-risk factors and on the management of evidence-based prevention strategies.

In addition to meeting all the training requirements in the core competency subjects recommended by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH), students enrolled in the UCI M.P.H. program will have the opportunity for in-depth pursuit of one out of three emphasis areas: Environmental Health, Epidemiology, or Sociocultural Diversity and Health. The M.P.H. is a 60-unit program. A full-time student must enroll in at least 12 units per quarter. Part-time enrollment is also allowed. To maintain residency, part-time students must enroll in four to eight units per quarter. All students are required to complete 240 hours of fieldwork at an approved public health practicum site.

Further information may be obtained from the Public Health Web site, http://publichealth.uci.edu/, or by calling (949) 824-7095 or sending e-mail to suiga@uci.edu.

CAREER INFORMATION

Graduates of the UCI M.P.H. program will find employment in both public and private agencies committed to preventing disease and promoting health in all aspects of society. Earning a graduate degree gives new professionals a competitive edge over students who complete their education at the bachelor's degree level. In particular, the curriculum of the M.P.H. program at UCI is specifically designed to create students who can combine knowledge of the five core disciplines in public health with leadership, communication, and problem-solving skills to meet the needs of culturally diverse communities. Earning an M.P.H. degree will allow graduates to pursue supervisory positions and career advancement opportunities that may be unattainable without an advanced degree. Students may also wish to combine an M.P.H. with a clinical degree in the health professions to increase opportunities for employment.

Course work in the M.P.H. program can also prepare a student to pursue doctoral programs in public health. The Ph.D. is a research-based degree that prepares the candidate for research and teaching positions in institutions of higher education. The Dr.P.H. is a professional degree that prepares candidates for careers as practitioners in high-level administration or teaching. UCI does not currently offer these degrees, but a proposal for a Ph.D. program is under review. More information about careers and graduate school in public health can be obtained through the Association of Schools of Public Health (http://www.whatispublichealth.org) and the Council of Education for Public Health (http://www.ceph.org).

GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The M.P.H. program accepts students for the fall quarter only. Students are encouraged to begin the application process early to facilitate the timely submission of the application. The deadline for receipt of all application materials for the M.P.H. program is January 15. There are no specific course prerequisites needed to enroll, and the program is open to students with bachelor's degrees in a variety of disciplines. Individuals from diverse cultural, geographic, and socioeconomic backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

To be eligible to apply for the M.P.H. program, applicants must meet certain minimum academic requirements. Applicants must hold a bachelor's degree from an accredited academic institution, have earned a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B average) in undergraduate course work, and possess strong verbal and quantitative skills as reflected by Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores. Applicants may also submit standardized test scores from the MCAT, GMAT, or LSAT in lieu of the GRE. If the applicant has, from a UC-equivalent university, a Ph.D. in a health-related field, a medical degree, or is currently enrolled in medical school, a test score must be submitted, but the test score's date does not need to be within the validity period. Evaluations of applicant files for admission to the M.P.H. program will consist of an assessment of transcripts of previous academic work, standardized graduate admission test scores, statement of purpose, letters of recommendation, and other relevant qualifications. Applicants must choose one of the three available emphases at the time of application. For more information on admissions, visit http://publichealth.uci.edu/ or contact suiga@uci.edu.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The M.P.H. is a 60-unit degree program consisting of fourteen courses taken over five quarters. Eight courses must be taken by all students. In addition, students choose three courses in their emphasis and three elective courses.

Required Courses. All students begin the program with a four-unit introductory course in the foundations of public health. The five core competency courses, each of which is four units, are Public Health Statistics, Environmental Health Science, Epidemiology, Health Policy and Management, and Health Behavior Theory. Students must also complete at least two quarters of the Graduate Seminar for two units each quarter, and the Graduate Practicum in Public Health (eight units).

Emphasis Courses. Three courses (four units each) in one of the three emphases are required. Students choose their emphasis at the time of application and select courses with the help of a faculty mentor in that emphasis.

Elective Courses. Three elective courses (four units each) are required. Students select electives in light of their educational and career goals.

Practicum. Students are required to complete a supervised internship of 240 hours while registered in the Graduate Practicum in Public Health (PubHlth 295). The practicum experience follows the first three academic quarters of study in public health, the completion of all core competency courses, and advancement to candidacy. A compendium of approved practicum sites is available online to enrolled M.P.H. students. The student's work at the practicum site is expected to culminate in the preparation and submission of a substantive manuscript suitable for publication, a detailed proposal for research, or a public health program implementation.

Comprehensive Examination. A two-part comprehensive examination will be administered by the faculty of the student's area of emphasis in the spring quarter. Part one consists of a written proctored examination on the core competency areas and the cross-disciplinary themes of public health. Part two consists of a synthesis paper on a contemporary topic in the student's area of emphasis. Students must pass both parts of the examination before they can be advanced to candidacy for the M.P.H. degree.

For students enrolled full-time, the normative time for completion of the M.P.H. degree is six quarters, and the maximum time permitted is nine quarters. For students enrolled part-time, the normative time is nine quarters, and the maximum is fifteen quarters.

Courses in Public Health

(Schedule of Classes designation: PubHlth)

LOWER-DIVISION

1 Principles of Public Health (4). Lecture, three hours. Introduces the major concepts and principles of public health and the determinants of health status in communities. Emphasizes the ecological model that focuses on the linkages and relationships among multiple natural and social determinants affecting health.

2 Case Studies in Public Health Practice (4). Lecture, three hours. Presents case studies in various themes of public health practice to demonstrate how the principles of public health were established and continue to evolve. Prerequisite: Public Health 1.

30 Human Environments (4). Lecture, three hours. Study of natural and physical components of earth's environmental problems due to human activities. Topics include global air, water, soil, biodiversity, rainforests, energy, demographics, agriculture, and urbanization. Theme is sustainability. Integrated into the science are social, legal, and economic considerations. (II)

60 Environmental Quality and Health (4). Lecture, three hours. A survey of how pollution in the natural and physical environment affects human health. Topics are toxicology, epidemiology, risk assessment, water, food, air, radiation, pesticides, solid and hazardous waste. Included are interdisciplinary elements of environmental regulations, environmental education, consumer protection. (II)

80 AIDS Fundamentals (4). Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Considers the biological and sociological bases of the AIDS epidemic. Topics include the history of AIDS, current medical knowledge, transmission, risk reduction, and how the community can respond. Same as Biological Sciences 45. (II)

90 Natural Disasters (4). Lecture, three hours. Natural disasters are natural processes that adversely affect humans. By examining these processes students develop a basic understanding of Earth's physical environment. Topics include: tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, severe weather, flooding, climate change, mass extinctions and impacts with space objects. (II)

UPPER-DIVISION

100 Special Topics in Public Health (4). Lecture, three hours. Special topics courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and in some cases, consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND GENETICS

101 Introduction to Epidemiology (4). Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. The distribution of disease and injury across time, space, and populations. Covers basic concepts and methods of descriptive epidemiology including the natural history of disease, demography, public health interventions, models, measurement, sources of data, and indices of health. Prerequisite: Mathematics 7, Statistics 7, or Statistics 8, or equivalent. Formerly Public Health 101A.

102 Social Epidemiology (4). Lecture, three hours. Overviews evidence linking environmental factors to mental and physical disorders including such variables as socioeconomic status, income inequality, work stress, job loss, social capital, location, and other demographic characteristics. Considers measurement and research design issues of both the individual and aggregate levels. Prerequisites: Psychology and Social Behavior 9 or 11C, or Psychology 7A or 9C, or equivalent; Social Ecology 10; Social Ecology 13 or equivalent. Same as Psychology and Social Behavior 183S.

103 Introduction to Genetic Epidemiology (4). Lecture, three hours. Examines the methodological approaches for studying the importance of genetic factors and gene-environment interactions in human diseases. Topics include: genetic and epidemiological concepts, population studies, family studies, and applications in medicine and public health. Prerequisite: Public Health 101.

104 Analytic and Applied Epidemiology (4). Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Covers basic concepts of analytic epidemiology and applications, including experimental and observational designs, prevention, screening, treatment and rehabilitation, infectious disease, and injury prevention. Prerequisite: Public Health 101. Formerly Public Health 101B.

119 Special Topics in Epidemiology and Genetics (4). Lecture, three hours. Special topics courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and in some cases, consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

HEALTH POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION

120 Nutrition and Global Health (4). Lecture, three hours. Global issues related to nutrition and public health. Evaluation of nutritional risk factors associated with the development of chronic diseases and the role of nutritional medicine in prevention. Topics include food safety, communicable diseases, supplements, and regulatory issues.

121 Introduction to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (4). Lecture, three hours. Examines health and disease in contemporary American culture and society with definitions, models, and practices of what has come to be known as "orthodox" or "conventional" medicine. Selected "alternative" or "complementary" modes of promoting health and well-being including homeopathy, herbology, and chiropractic. Formerly Environmental Analysis and Design E172.

122 Health Policy (4). Lecture, three hours. Considers social and economic aspects of health and disease in the United States. What are the proper roles of the individual, community, and government in improving health and health care? International comparisons will be made wherever possible. Same as Planning, Policy, and Design 170.

123 Public Issues in Biotechnology (4). Lecture, three hours. An assessment of developments in biotechnology potentially affecting various facets of human society, or warranting significant public debate. Covers the implications of genetic engineering and other biotechnological developments for public health, environment, agriculture, legislation, research ethics, public policy, and commerce. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and 2 or consent of instructor.

124 Environmental and Public Health Policy (4). Lecture, three hours. Examines factors involved in shaping public health and environmental policy. Topics include the role of science in public health policy, the function of governmental regulatory agencies, citizen participation, and economic and sociopolitical aspects of controlling infectious diseases and regulating carcinogens.

134 Asian American Community Public Health (4). Lecture, three hours. Focuses on major issues and concepts of community health and their application to public health programs for Asian American populations. Analyzes individual, institutional, community, and policy factors that influence a person's health status within a larger environmental context. Same as Asian American Studies 134. (VII)

139 Special Topics in Health Policy and Administration (4). Lecture, three hours. Special topics courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and in some cases, consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SCIENCE

140 Beliefs, Attitudes, and Health Behaviors (4). Lecture, three hours. Examines health-relevant beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors from a social psychological perspective. Topics include: self-control; obesity; sexual behavior; medication errors, stress, perceived control and social support; happiness and well-being; changing health attitudes and behaviors; self-disclosure and health. Prerequisite: Psychology and Social Behavior 9 or 11C, or Psychology 7A or 9C, or equivalent. Same as Psychology and Social Behavior 181S.

141 Clinical Health Psychology (4). Lecture, three hours. Role of behavior in etiology, treatment, and prevention of certain diseases. Behavioral intervention including biofeedback, stress-, pain-management, health habit counseling, and other skills to assist patients make cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes needed to cope with disease or achieve better health. Prerequisite: Psychology and Social Behavior 9 or 11C, or Psychology 7A or 9C, or equivalent. Same as Psychology and Social Behavior 141H.

142 The Human Pain Experience (4). Lecture, three hours. Examines the physiological and sociocultural correlates of human pain perception. Emphasis on laboratory and clinical methods of measuring acute and chronic pain; social influences on the experience and communication of pain; biopsychosocial approaches to pain control. Prerequisites: Psychology and Social Behavior 9 or 11C, or Psychology 7A or 9C, or equivalent; and any upper-division course from the Health or Pre-clinical Psychology areas.

143 Social Ecology of Health Promotion (4). Lecture, three hours. Core themes of Social Ecology are examined as they apply to major areas of health promotion research and practice. Students attend lectures and work collaboratively on team projects conducted in university and community settings. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Same as Social Ecology 131.

144 Health Behavior Theory (4). Lecture, three hours. Introduces theoretical perspectives from the social sciences to understand health behavior from the vantage point of individuals, their interpersonal contacts, communities, and ecological contexts. Application of theory to public health problems is a central focus.

145 Gender, Biology, and Environmental Ethics (4). What is "nature" and how do we know and represent it? Introduces students to the history of "nature" produced within scientific knowledge, as well as historical developments. Previous lower-division course work in Women's Studies is recommended, but not required. Same as Women's Studies 165A.

147 Drug Abuse and Its Prevention (4). Lecture, three hours. Theoretical and practical underpinnings of drug abuse and its prevention at the individual and population levels. Students practice developing drug abuse prevention schemes for specific populations. Recent developments in pharmacological and biobehavioral theories of drug dependence are explored.

148 Public Health Communication (4). Lecture, three hours. Theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of communication sciences in public health practice. Techniques of effective communication, including fear appeal and deterrence; social marketing; public-private partnerships; health service delivery; and outreach in rural and urban settings, and for international health strategies. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and 2.

151 Environmental Psychology (4). Lecture, three hours. Impact of the physical environment on individual and group behavior. Three basic concerns examined: (a) environmental determinants of behavior at the individual and interpersonal level; (b) social planning and urban design; and (c) methodological approaches to the study of environmental issues. Prerequisites: Environmental Analysis and Design E8, Social Ecology 10, or Planning, Policy, and Design 4. Same as Planning, Policy, and Design 151 and Psychology and Social Behavior 171S.

159 Special Topics in Social and Behavioral Health Science (4). Lecture, three hours. Special topics courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and in some cases, consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCE

160 Environmental Pollution and Remediation (4). Lecture, three hours. The study of pollution—its identification, risks, and remediation. Analysis of sources of natural and anthropogenic environmental pollutants using ecological concepts, chemical fate and transport, engineering technologies, economics, and policy to provide understanding and solutions to these problems. Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Formerly Environmental Analysis and Design E103.

161 Environmental Geology (4). Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to geologic principles and applications to environmental problems. Topics include: tectonic processes, earth materials, soils, river processes, groundwater, the coastal environment, slope failures, seismic hazards, mineral resources, and land-use evaluation based on geologic conditions. Examples from case studies. Prerequisite: Environmental Analysis and Design E1, E3, or E8. Formerly Environmental Analysis and Design E110.

162 Human Ecology of Health (4). Lecture, three hours. Many human health problems are directly associated with ethnicity, sex, and age. Course integrates the science of these issues with anthropology, geography, economics to understand the relationship, management, treatment. Involves lectures and discussions to probe these factors.

163 Environmental Health Science (4). Lecture, three hours. Focuses on processes of exposure to environmental toxins/agents and their impact to human health and the environment. Media transport, exposure assessment, susceptibility, behavior, and health effect of several toxins are discussed. Formerly Environmental Analysis and Design E115.

164 Toxic Chemicals in the Environment (4). Lecture, three hours. Explores the sources, transformation, and sinks of toxic chemicals in the environment, and their effects on public health. Covers regulatory issues and design-for-the-environment initiatives to reduce or eliminate the adverse effects of toxic chemicals Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and 2 or consent of instructor.

164L Toxic Chemicals in the Environment Laboratory (4). Laboratory, three hours. Covers field sampling techniques and laboratory analysis methods for assessing the occurrence and effects of toxic chemicals in environmental compartments, including water, soils, sediments, air, and food resources. Prerequisite or corequisite: Public Health 164. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and 2 or consent of instructor.

165 Issues in Potable Water Reuse (4). Lecture, three hours. Provides an in-depth study of the treatment and subsequent reuse of wastewater for drinking. Analyzes existing regulations for both drinking water and reuse situations, microbial and chemical contaminants, health concerns and risk assessment. Prerequisite: Environmental Analysis and Design E8. Formerly Environmental Analysis and Design E163.

166 Geographic Information Systems (4). Lecture, one and one half hours; laboratory, one and one half hours. Basic geographic, cartographic, and GIS concepts including computer representation of physical, political, statistical, and social aspects of space using vector and grid-based maps. Experience with extensive geographic base map files and databases through use of GIS software (ArcView 3.x). Same as Criminology, Law and Society C148.

167 Air Pollution, Climate, and Health (4). Lecture, three hours. Introduction to how air pollutants are emitted into the atmosphere, how people are most exposed to air pollutants in developed and developing areas, physical and meteorological processes that affect transport, and the influence of air pollutants on global warming.

168 Nuclear Environments (4). Lecture, three hours. Understanding the impact of the nuclear age on the environment and human health through the interrelated developments of nuclear power and nuclear weapons. The early years of weapon development, catastrophic environmental pollution, perils of nuclear power in the U.S. and Russia. Same as Environmental Analysis and Design E127 and International Studies 122. (VIII)

169 Indirect Methods in Human Exposure Assessment (4). Lecture, three hours. Indirect methods in estimating human exposure to environmental agents. Topics include air, noise, dermal and ingestion exposure assessment, time-activity and micro-environmental approach, uncertainty and variability analysis, and the use of GIS and remote sensing in exposure assessment.

173 Health and Global Environmental Change (4). Lecture, three hours. Overview of scientific underpinnings of global environmental change and human health consequences. Provides students with an understanding of the fundamental dependency of human health on global environmental integrity. Encourages disciplinary cross-fertilization through interaction of students in environmental, health, and policy sciences. Prerequisite: at least one upper-division course in environmental science, public health, environmental policy, and/or environmental management, or consent of instructor.

179 Special Topics in Environmental and Global Health Science (4). Lecture, three hours. Special topics courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and in some cases, consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES

189 Special Topics in Infectious Diseases (4). Lecture, three hours. Special topics courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and in some cases, consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

GENERAL TOPICS

195 Public Health Practicum (8). Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; fieldwork, 10 hours. Provides direct opportunities for Public Health majors to observe and participate in public health activities and/or research; and to cultivate skills for verbal and written communication of contemporary public health topics. Prerequisites: Public Health 1 and 2; satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; upper-division Public Health majors only. (IX)

198 Directed Studies (1 to 4). Prerequisite: Public Health 1. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

199 Special Studies (1 to 4). Prerequisites: consent of instructor and upper-division standing. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

GRADUATE

200 Foundations of Public Health (4). Presents the overarching framework, principles, and core responsibilities of public health research and practice from a multidisciplinary perspective. Provides necessary foundation for further studies toward advanced cross-cutting approaches essential for public health practice. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

201 Cancer Epidemiology (4). Concentrates on understanding how epidemiology plays a role in the search for cancer etiology, prevention, control, and treatment; gives an overview of cancer research with an appreciation of the multidisciplinary nature of the field. Prerequisites: Public Health 203; graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E250/Epidemiology 201.

202 Genetic Epidemiology (4). Concentrates on the role of genetic factors in the etiology of disease in human populations with an objective of disease control and prevention, and the role of interactions of genetic factors and environmental exposures in the occurrence of disease. Prerequisites: Public Health 203; graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E251/Epidemiology 202.

203 Environmental Health Sciences III: Epidemiology (4). Presents descriptive and experimental approaches to the recognition of the causal association of disease in the general population, as these approaches apply to populations using different student designs and models from the literature. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E226/Epidemiology 203.

204 Environmental Health Sciences V: Biostatistics (4). Designed to help students develop an appreciation for the statistician's view of the research process, emphasizing biomedical research. Instills an understanding of how statistical models are used to yield insights about the data that form evidence-based understanding of the world around us. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E227/Epidemiology 204.

205 Advanced Epidemiologic Methods (4). Advanced topics in the design and statistical analysis of epidemiologic studies. Topics include simulation methods, counter-matching and multiphase study designs, missing data, and Bayesian analysis. Published simulation studies are discussed and replicated using the R software package. Prerequisite: Public Health 101B or Statistics 111 or Statistics 211 or consent of instructor. Same as Epidemiology 217.

206 Graduate Epidemiology in Public Health (4). Presents descriptive and experimental approaches to the recognition of the causal association of disease in the general populations, as these approaches apply to populations using different student designs and models from the literature. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

220 Public Health Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (4). Examines using cost-effectiveness information to allocate limited resources to maximize health benefits to a population; defining and measuring cost, survival, and health-related quality of life; and how to calculate cost-effectiveness using decision trees and Markov simulation models. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E228, Planning, Policy, and Design 226, and Psychology and Social Behavior P228.

221 Health Promotion and Planning (4). Focuses on health and health care in the United States, but discussion of global health issues and/or international comparisons will be made whenever possible. Considers both the social and economic aspects of health and disease. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Planning, Policy, and Design 241.

240 Topics in Environmental Health Promotion and Education (4). Focuses on design of intervention strategies dependent on the environmental agent, exposure to assessment, SES, health effects, stakeholders, and support base. Programmatic design includes media selection, communication/education, and pre/post surveys. Analysis of transborder and local environmental health promotion programs. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E254.

241 Environmental Policy and Global Sustainability (4). Seminar organized around four transcendent questions: does the world value sustainability, what challenges must be met to move toward it, what are the roots of inequality, and is capitalism compatible with sustainability. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Social Ecology 250.

259 Special Topics in Social and Behavioral Health Sciences (4). Current research in Social and Behavioral Health Sciences. Topics vary from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

260 Coastal Ecosystem Health (4). Examines the causes of coastal ecosystem degradation and strategies to restore the ecosystem balance or to prevent further coastal ecosystem health degradation. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 275 and Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E205.

261 Environmental Hydrology (4). Provides an overview of the occurrence, distribution, and movement of water in the environment. Quantitative methods are introduced for analyzing hydrologic processes. Human impacts on water distribution and quality are considered. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E230.

262 Earthquakes and Seismic Hazard (4). Provides an overview of earthquakes and introduction to seismic hazard. Topics include characteristics and effects of earthquakes, sources of earthquakes, seismic hazard assessment, introduction to earthquake loss estimation and mitigation. California examples are emphasized. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E231.

263 Seminar in Paleoseismology (4). Provides an introduction to paleoseismology and its applications. Topics include data collection methods, data analysis, earthquakes in different tectonic environments, and applications to seismic hazard assessment and fault characterization. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E232.

264 Environmental Health Sciences I: Introduction to Environmental Health Science (4). Convergence of agents (chemical, physical, biological, or psychosocial) in the environment can emerge as diseases influenced by social, political, and economic factors, allowing them to become rooted in society. How these agents from various spheres come together and impact human health. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E224/Epidemiology 264.

265 Environmental Health Sciences II: Advanced Environmental Health Science (4). Explores the complex relationships among exposure processes and adverse health effects of environmental toxins focusing on specific chemicals, sources, transport media, exposure pathways, and human behaviors. Techniques of environmental sampling for exposure assessment are discussed. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E225/Epidemiology 265.

266 Remediation of Environmental Pollutants (4). Topics include sources of natural and anthropogenic environmental pollutants using ecological concepts, chemical fate and transport, engineering and biological remediation technologies, economics, policy to provide understanding and solutions to these problems. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E253.

267 Potable Reuse (4). Provides an in-depth study of the treatment and subsequent reuse of wastewater for drinking. Analyzes existing regulations for both drinking water and reuse situations, microbial and chemical contaminants, hydrogeology, health concerns, and risk assessment. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E263.

268 Environmental Health Science IV: The Lead Case (4). The social ecology of lead use and presence in subsistence goods and the environment, examined from earliest prehistory to the present. Lead has specific health impacts throughout human development. Public policy and surveillance are discussed. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E293.

269 Air Pollution, Climate, and Health (4). Emission of air pollutants into the atmosphere, physical and meteorological processes that affect transport, and influence on global warming. Concepts of how and where people are most exposed, and how exposures and health effects differ in developed and developing regions. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E247 and Epidemiology 269.

270 Human Exposure to Environmental Contaminants (4). Introduces founders of conceptual thought that environmental contaminants can impact health. Theory and principles of exposure assessment, the continuum from emissions of a contaminant into the environment to evidence of health effects in a population. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E248/Epidemiology 270.

271 Health Impacts of Environmental Change (4). Seminar on health impacts of environmental change at various scales of analysis. Uses numerical models such as "MIASMA" and "TARGETS" to analyze alternative outcomes of environmental-change scenarios. Presentations from experts are featured. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E245.

272 Environmental Health and Quality (4). Concepts and principles of environmental health. Focuses on industrial hygiene, water and air quality, noise pollution, and environmental carcinogens. Discusses theory and implementation practices through review of legislative measures and enforcement procedures. Examines social and biological interactions surrounding each topic. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E283.

273 Seminar in Environmental Health, Science, and Policy (2). Topics relevant to the field of environmental health, science, and policy are covered in depth. Included are: hazardous and biological pollutants in soil, water, air; remediation technologies; water conflicts; and regulations pertaining to contaminants. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E285.

274 Grant Writing in Environmental Health Sciences Seminar (4). Teaches graduate students fundamentals of grant writing through introduction to funding sources, the missions of these sources, and how differences in mission statements translate into different goals within a proposal. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Environmental Health, Science, and Policy E290.

276 Toxic Chemicals in the Environment (4). Industrial ecology of toxicants and their impacts on environmental quality and human health. Explores theoretical basis of toxicity thresholds and regulatory issues. Uses classic and contemporary research articles to understand the legacy of traditional toxicants, and to identify emerging threats. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Same as Epidemiology 244.

280 Global Burden of Disease (4). Introduces composite measures of disease burden, including Disability Adjusted Life Years and their use in prioritizing disease burden at local, regional, and global levels. Focuses on WHO's landmark assessments and introduces DISMOD software for specific analyses. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

281 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (4). Covers geographical distribution of infectious diseases and the health and disease risk in diverse human populations. Introduces basic methods for infectious disease epidemiology and case studies of important diseases. Includes surveillance, outbreak investigation, emerging pathogens, traditional and molecular epidemiology. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

290 Special Topics in Public Health (4). Varying topics in the field of Public Health. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

291A-B-C Graduate Seminar: Advances and Challenges in Public Health (2-2-2). Forum for exploring recent advances and challenges in all disciplines of public health research and practice. Features case studies exemplifying the integration of core competencies with cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes of public health. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

292 Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research in Public Health (4). Covers issues of scientific integrity and satisfies the requirements for training in public health ethics. Includes guidelines for responsible conduct of research, federal and international codes, administrative review and approval, conflict of interest, and privacy and safety of research participants. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

295 Graduate Practicum in Public Health (8). Provides opportunities for hands-on experience for graduate students at agencies or organizations engaged in public health practice. Students are matched with placement sites based on academic preparation and students' career goals. The practicum experience culminates in a comprehensive written report. Prerequisites: Public Health 290 and 291. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

298 Directed Studies in Public Health (2 to 4). Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

299 Independent Study in Public Health (2 to 8). Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

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