DEPARTMENT OF DANCE

301 Mesa Arts Building; (949) 824-7284
http://dance.arts.uci.edu/
Lisa Naugle, Department Chair

Faculty / Undergraduate Program / Graduate Program / Courses

The Department of Dance fosters an educational environment in which performance opportunities, creative projects, and theoretical studies complement and reinforce each other, providing a foundation for careers in dance. The program focuses on the dance techniques of ballet, modern, jazz, tap, world dance, and dance and technology. Theoretical studies include dance history and theory; dance writing; Laban studies; dance pedagogy; dance ethnography; dance science; and aesthetics of digital media. Creative opportunities bridge the studio and theoretical work through performance and choreography for multiple contexts; creative applications of animation, motion capture, audio and video technologies; lecture demonstration; and critical, historical, ethnographical, and scientific writing.

The objective of studio work is to develop kinesthetic resources, precision, flexibility, creativity, and freedom in a coordinated and intelligently responsive dancer. The techniques of classical ballet, modern dance, and jazz constitute crafts and styles for the dancer that serve not only as a basis for the training of the body, but also as a basic language of movement for the choreographer.

The theoretical, historical, and scientific courses are designed both to broaden the perspective of those students whose first interest is performance or choreography, and to provide a foundation for those students who plan to pursue careers in the academic, scientific, technological, or administrative fields of dance.

The dance archives in the UCI Langson Library Special Collections offer a rich source of research materials which enhance the Dance program. Among other special holdings, the archives include the extensive Ruth Clark Lert collection of dance books, journals, photographs, original costume sketches, and memorabilia of dance in Europe and the United States from pre-World War I to the present.

CAREERS FOR THE DANCE MAJOR

Careers in dance require excellent training and extraordinary discipline, tenacity, and dedication. Graduates of the Department have an excellent record of placement in the many fields of dance. Some have become professional dancers in ballet companies (including the Metropolitan Opera Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, Nashville Ballet, and Joffrey); in modern dance companies (including Hubbard Street Dance Company, MOMIX, and Martha Graham Dance Ensemble); in touring companies (including The Lion King, Fame: The Musical, Carousel, and Cirque du Soleil); and in films, television, and theatre.

In addition to training for professional dance performance and choreography, the major in dance serves as a basis for graduate study or job opportunities in fields such as dance history, dance science, dance pedagogy, dance reconstruction, dance criticism, dance video, and technology. Related fields, such as arts administration, law in relation to the arts, arts therapies, design and production, and music also offer positions for graduates. Students who are interested in a career in athletic training, physical therapy, or dance science will find a major in Dance, with related course work in chemistry, physics, biology, and mathematics, to be excellent preparation for further study.

THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) is designed for those who wish to obtain a broad undergraduate background as preparation for careers or graduate work and related fields. It offers students a dance education that stresses performance and choreography, and, at the same time, intellectual depth and scope. In addition to the core, 12 units of elective Dance courses are required. The remaining elective units required for graduation may be chosen from Dance or other disciplines in relation to a student's individual interest. While the program of study in Dance stresses technical proficiency and academic understanding in dance, the B.A. degree program also enables students to pursue elective subjects in their special areas of interest in other academic disciplines.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree program with specializations in Performance and Choreography, is designed for students who wish to prepare intensively for careers in those areas. The courses required in addition to the core are primarily in Dance. The B.F.A. program allows for a few free electives in other areas. Admission to the B.F.A. program with a specialization in Choreography is by faculty approval only.

The B.F.A. program with a specialization in Performance does not require additional faculty approval beyond the required audition for admission to the Dance major; students should declare their intention to pursue this specialization during spring quarter of their sophomore year.

Proficiency Levels

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to UCI, applicants must demonstrate technical/creative promise. The Department holds annual entrance auditions for potential freshmen and transfer students during winter quarter prior to the fall quarter when entrance is anticipated. First-year students wishing to major in Dance must be at technique level II in at least one of the three major genres (ballet, modern, jazz).

Placement auditions for admitted students are held during Welcome Week to determine levels of technical ability for placement in courses. It is suggested that transfer students wishing to pursue a B.A. degree in Dance complete, in addition to their general education requirements, one course in choreography, two courses in dance technique, and one course in music for dancers prior to transfer to UCI.

Previously admitted majors who wish to obtain a B.F.A. degree should contact the School of the Arts Student Affairs Office to obtain information about change of major requirements, procedures, and policies.

Transfer students wishing to pursue the B.F.A. degree must declare their intention in writing at the time of their entrance audition and demonstrate technique and/or choreography levels appropriate to their year. It is suggested that transfer students complete, in addition to their general education requirements, one course in choreography, two courses in dance technique, one course in music for dancers, and one course in dance performance prior to transfer to UCI.

Students deficient in level of performance or academic preparation should be prepared to extend their studies beyond the normal four-year program in order to meet the requirements for graduation.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE IN DANCE

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: None.

Departmental Requirements for the Major

Dance 2 (Dance Health and Injury Prevention); Dance 21A (Music for Dancers); Dance 60A (Choreography); Dance 90A-B-C (Dance History); Dance 100 (Kinesiology for Dance); Dance 180A-B or A-C (Laban Studies); Dance 185 (Critical Issues in Dance).

Technique: Students must complete at least one Dance technique course (ballet, modern dance, jazz, Spanish, world dance, pointe, social dance, tap, or repertory) each quarter in residence. At a minimum, students must complete level II in Ballet, Modern, and Jazz (Dance 132A-B-C, Dance 142A-B-C, and Dance 152A-B-C) and level III in either Ballet or Modern (Dance 133A-B-C or Dance 143A-B-C). Students who place above level II in any technique must take a year of that technique at the level in which they are placed. All students must also complete one course chosen from Dance 12A, 12B, 12C (Spanish Dance), 14 (Social Dance), 52A, 52B, 52C (Tap I), 110 (World Dance), or 150A, 150B, 150C (Tap II). NOTE: Units earned in ballet, jazz, and modern technique courses beyond the required amount do not count toward departmental elective requirements but may count toward University requirements.

Performance: Two performances from Dance 170, 171, or 172.

Four units of Drama 101 (Theater Production) must be taken during the first year in residence.

Electives: 12 units of electives must be completed within the major.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.F.A. DEGREE IN DANCE

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: None.

Departmental Requirements for the Major

Students must complete the departmental requirements as listed for the B.A. degree in Dance. In addition, B.F.A. students must complete the requirements for either the specialization in Choreography or Performance.

Choreography Specialization: Dance 60B-C (Choreography I); Dance 127A (Costume Design for Dance); Drama 30A (Acting); Drama 50C (Lighting Design); any three quarters of courses chosen from Dance 162A-B-C (Choreography II) and Dance 164 (Screendance); two courses in Dance 165 (Choreographic Projects—one original choreographic work, approved by the faculty, must be presented in both the junior and senior years); four units (one or two courses) in Art History, Music, Studio Art, or Drama (in addition to Drama 30A, Drama 50C, and Drama 101 requirements).

Performance Specialization: Technique: Dance 134A-B-C (Ballet IV) or Dance 135A-B-C (Ballet V) or Dance 144A-B-C (Modern IV); Dance 153A-B-C (Jazz III); Dance 139 (Partnering).

Performance: Dance 137 (Repertory) or Dance 179 (Etude Ensemble); Dance 170 series: must be in three additional performances beyond the B.A. requirements, one of which must be Dance 170, 171, 172, or 174; Drama 30A (Acting) or a fourth additional performance in the Dance 170 series. Dance 171 and 172 may be repeated for credit. Students must demonstrate proficiency in at least two dance genres in these performances.

Sample Program for Freshmen (B.A. and B.F.A. Programs)

Fall

Winter

Spring

Writing 39B

Writing 39C

Dance 2

Dance 21A

General Education

General Education

Technique

General Education

General Education

General Education

Technique

Technique

Drama 101 (2 units)

Drama 101 (2 units)

MASTER OF FINE ARTS PROGRAM

Degree Offered

M.F.A. in Dance.

General Information

The M.F.A. program is an intensive program requiring a core of courses in studio and academic areas. The student's individual area of interest is explored through the thesis project in the second year. Projects or written theses may be pursued in choreography, video choreography, dance training, dance history and theory, ethnography, dance science, dance reconstruction, and dance and digital technology.

Admission

Applicants for admission to the degree program must meet the general requirements for admission to graduate study and hold a B.A. or B.F.A. in Dance or the equivalent. Candidates must meet the minimum requirements for the B.A. degree in Dance at UCI. Proposals for three choreographic works that could be completed in the graduate program must be submitted. An audition in ballet and modern technique is required for admission and is held in winter quarter. At this audition, applicants must also present a prepared five-minute choreographed piece, which may be a solo performed by the applicant, or a videotape of the applicant's choreography. Interviews with faculty are conducted following the audition, and applicants are given a short writing exercise.

Teaching Assistantships

Graduate students are encouraged to apply for teaching assistantships in areas such as notation, dance science, history, music for dancers, choreography, world dance, dance video, critical issues, and all technique classes. Students with expertise in any of these areas are given special consideration.

General Degree Requirements

Normally two years of residence are required. Each candidate must enroll for three courses each quarter for six quarters, exclusive of summer sessions.

In the second year, satisfactory attainment must be demonstrated by a major thesis; in choreography this consists of the composition and production of a choreographic work; in other areas, such as dance history, dance training, or dance science, this consists of a written thesis or a comprehensive project in a chosen area of study. All theses must be defended in a one-hour oral examination which may also test the candidate's general knowledge in the area.

The normative time to degree for students in the M.F.A. program is two years. Residence is required. The normative time to degree can be extended to three years only when a student requests extra time for more involved thesis research through a petition to the Chair of the Department. The maximum time to degree is three years. Students who do not complete the degree in three years will be dropped from the program.

Specific Degree Requirements

Seventy-two quarter units in graduate or approved upper-division undergraduate courses must be completed with a grade of at least B in each course. No more than 20 units in upper-division courses may count toward the degree. Fulfillment of the technique course requirements must be approved by the faculty advisor.

Required Courses

Six courses chosen from any graduate or upper-division dance technique course; Seminar in Kinesiology for Dance (Dance 201); Musical Resources (Dance 222); Teaching of Dance Techniques (Dance 225); two courses in Graduate Choreography (Dance 261); Dance and Video Technology (Dance 281); Movement Analysis (Dance 282); Critical Issues in Dance (Dance 283); Bibliography and Research (Dance 284); Thesis (Dance 286); Proseminar in Dance History (Dance 296).

By the end of their first year, students will choose their area of study for their thesis. Students who wish to produce a choreographic thesis must apply to the graduate choreography advisor during winter of their first year. The faculty will review the applications and will consider the quality of the student's work in Dance 261, as well as the choreographic proposal, in making their selection.

Courses in Dance

(Schedule of Classes designation: Dance)

LOWER-DIVISION

NOTE: Some courses are not offered every year. Please check with the department advisor.

2 Dance Health and Injury Prevention (4). An overview of factors that affect the health of dancers. Includes evaluation of general health measures and prevention and management of common dance injuries. Open to Dance majors only.

3 Scientific Concepts of Health (4). Introduction to the scientific foundations of health, with an emphasis on those pertaining to success in college and lifetime wellness. Includes principles of cardiorespiratory, musculosketal, flexibility, and nutritional fitness. A variety of learning experiences will be offered to apply science to real life. (II)

4 Introduction to Quantitative Research in Exercise Science (4). Introduction to quantitative scientific inquiry as it pertains to exercise science and related fields. Includes evaluation of primary scientific research literature, research design, data collection and analysis, and research communication. (II)

12A-B-C Studio Workshop in Spanish Dance (2-2-2) F, W, S. Principles of Spanish dance with focus on basic movement techniques, castanet work, and introduction to flamenco and other Spanish dance genres. May be taken for credit three times.

14 Social Dance (2). Contemporary and historical forms. Current ballroom, disco, and Western square dance forms; Latin ballroom dances; dances from the 20s, 30s, and 40s. Pass/Not Pass only.

21A Music for Dancers (4). Emphasis on the development of musical skills most pertinent to the dancer: vocabulary, notational literacy, rhythmic and melodic acuity, score reading, and fundamental analysis; working with live accompaniment. Open to Dance majors only.

30A-B-C Studio Workshop in Ballet I (2-2-2) F, W, S, (30) Summer. Beginning ballet: fundamentals and principles of classical ballet with an emphasis on technique. Pass/Not Pass only. May be taken for credit twice.

34 Men's Studio Workshop in Ballet (2) F, W, S. Emphasis on men's traditional ballet, techniques, and movements. Prerequisites: Dance 30A-B-C. May be repeated for credit.

40A-B-C Studio Workshop in Modern I (2-2-2) F, W, S, (40) Summer. Fundamentals of modern dance: principles of modern tradition developed from Graham, Humphrey, and Wigman. Pass/Not Pass only. May be taken for credit twice.

50A-B-C Studio Workshop in Jazz I (2-2-2) F, W, S. (50) Summer. Fundamentals of jazz: principles of jazz dance and contemporary forms incorporating the personal point of view of the instructor. Pass/Not Pass only. May be taken for credit twice.

52A-B-C Workshop in Tap I (2-2-2) F, W, S. Beginning tap: principles of rhythm and basic tap steps. Course sequence may be taken for credit twice.

60A-B-C Choreography I (4-4-4) F, W, S. Beginning-to-intermediate study of principles of dance composition. May include composition assignments for stage and video. By audition, works may be shown quarterly in public studio performances. Open to Dance majors only.

80 Introduction to Ballet and Modern Dance (4). Survey of nineteenth- and twentieth-century ballet, modern dance, and theatre dance. For non-majors only. Dance 80 and Dance 90A-B-C may not both be taken for credit. (VIII)

81 American Ballet and Modern Dance Since 1900 (4). A survey of American ballet and modern dance in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Lectures are supplemented by video. For non-majors only. Dance 81 and Dance 90C may not both be taken for credit. (IV)

82 Topics in World Dance (4). Various topics in world dance studies focusing on historical, social, and cultural contexts. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (VIII)

90A-B-C Dance History A, B, C (4-4-4) F, W, S. 90A: Global perspectives. Topics and histories of dance and movement practices from various parts of the world. 90B: The history of dance in the western tradition from the Renaissance through the nineteenth century. 90C: The history of dance in the western tradition: the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Dance 90A-B-C and Dance 80 may not both be taken for credit. Dance 90C and Dance 81may not both be taken for credit. Dance majors have first consideration for enrollment. (IV, VIII)

UPPER-DIVISION

100 Kinesiology for Dance (4). The study of the production of dance movement by the musculoskeletal system. Anatomical and dynamic analysis of dance movement. Open to Dance majors only.

103 Pilates (2). Basics of technique emphasizing alignment, breath control, correction of muscular imbalances. Use of the Universal Reformer. Prerequisites: Dance 133A-B-C or 143A-B-C.

110 World Dance (2). Studio workshop of dances and movement sources of specified countries or areas. May be taken for credit six times as topic varies.

125A Teaching of Dance (4). Pedagogy. The methods and theory of teaching dance forms. Prerequisites: Dance 133A-B-C and 143A-B-C; upper-division standing. Open to Dance majors only.

127A Costume Design for Dance (4). Costume design and construction specific to the body in motion. Theoretical study and practical execution. Open to Dance majors only.

130A-B-C Pointe Class (2-2-2). Beginning and intermediate pointe work; principles of classical ballet with an emphasis on technique. Prerequisites: Dance 132A-B-C. May be taken for credit three times. Open to Dance majors only.

132A-B-C Studio Workshop in Ballet II (2-2-2) F, W, S, (132) Summer. Intermediate ballet and beginning pointe work; principles of classical ballet with an emphasis on technique. Prerequisites for non-Dance majors: Dance 30A-B-C or audition. May be taken for credit twice. Dance majors have first consideration for enrollment.

133A-B-C Advanced Studio Workshop in Ballet III (2-2-2) F, W, S, (133) Summer. Advanced intermediate ballet and pointe work; principles of classical ballet with an emphasis on technique. Prerequisites: Dance 132A-B-C or audition. May be taken for credit twice. Open to Dance majors only.

134A-B-C Advanced Studio Workshop in Ballet IV (4-4-4) F, W, S, (134) Summer. Advanced ballet, pointe work, and performance styles: principles of classical ballet. Prerequisites: Dance 133A-B-C with a grade of B+ or better in 133C and consent of the ballet faculty, or audition. May be taken for credit three times. Open to Dance majors only.

135A-B-C Advanced Studio Workshop in Ballet V (4-4-4) F, W, S. Advanced ballet, pointe work, and performance styles: principles of classical ballet. Prerequisites: Dance 134A-B-C with a grade of B+ or better in 134C, and consent of the ballet faculty, or audition. May be taken for credit three times. Open to Dance majors only.

137 Repertory (2). Rehearsal and performance of repertoire from established ballet, modern, or jazz choreographers. Prerequisites: Dance 133A-B-C or 143A-B-C and consent of instructor. May be taken for credit three times. Open to Dance majors only.

139 Partnering (2). Principles of partnering techniques in various dance performance styles. Prerequisites: Dance 133A-B-C, Dance 143A-B-C, and consent of instructor. May be taken for credit four times. Open to Dance majors only.

142A-B-C Studio Workshop in Modern II (2-2-2) F, W, S, (142) Summer. Introduction to the principles of motion, including the use of breath, gravity, spatial awareness, and time values. Prerequisites for non-Dance majors: Dance 40A-B-C or audition. May be taken for credit twice. Dance majors have first consideration for enrollment.

143A-B-C Advanced Studio Workshop in Modern III (2-2-2) F, W, S, (143) Summer. Builds on fundamentals of Dance 142A-B-C and introduces performance techniques. Prerequisites: Dance 142A-B-C. May be taken for credit twice. Open to Dance majors only.

144A-B-C Advanced Studio Workshop in Modern IV (2-2-2) F, W, S. Synthesis of fundamentals and performance technique. Aims to bring students to the preprofessional level. Prerequisite: Dance 143A-B-C or consent of instructor. May be taken for credit twice. Open to Dance majors only.

150A-B-C Studio Workshop in Tap II (2-2-2). Intermediate tap: principles of beginning tap continued and developed. Prerequisite: Dance 52A-B-C or consent of instructor. May be taken for credit twice.

152A-B-C Intermediate Studio Workshop in Jazz II (2-2-2) F, W, S. Intermediate jazz: principles of jazz dance and contemporary forms incorporating the personal views of the instructor. Prerequisites for non-Dance majors: Dance 50A-B-C. May be taken for credit twice. Dance majors have first consideration for enrollment.

153A-B-C Advanced Studio Workshop in Jazz III (2-2-2) F, W, S. Advanced jazz: principles of jazz dance and contemporary forms incorporating the personal views of the instructor. Prerequisites: Dance 152A-B-C. May be taken for credit twice. Open to Dance majors only.

154A-B-C Advanced Jazz: Performance Techniques IV (2-2-2) F, W, S. Advanced jazz emphasizing performance techniques. Prerequisites: Dance 153A-B-C. May be taken for credit twice. Open to Dance majors only.

160 Improvisation (2). Structured and experiential improvisation to heighten the personal intuitive processes, the kinesthetic sense, spatial and temporal awareness, and to encourage insights into the potential movement resources of the individual for performance and choreography. Course encourages freedom of exploration. May be taken for credit two times.

162A-B-C Choreography II (4-4-4). Directed choreographic projects for stage or video integrating the elements of stagecraft. In process or completed works may be shown quarterly in public studio or stage performances. By audition only. Prerequisites: Dance 60A-B-C. Open to Dance majors only.

163 Dance and Video Technology (4). Introduction to video and audio documentation of dance performance. Integrating dance performance within the film aesthetic. Techniques and technologies of video cameras, formats, editing, and projection. Overview of video compression and DVD authoring. Prerequisite: Dance 60A or consent of instructor. Open to Dance majors only.

164 Screendance (4). Overview of dance for film and choreography for the camera. Aesthetics of creating dance for the screen. Approaches for delivery of dance films to an audience, including projection, DVD, Web, and mobile devices. A final dance film project is required. Prerequisite: Dance 163 or consent of instructor. Formerly Dance 164A. Open to Dance majors only.

165 Choreographic Projects (1 to 4) S. Supervised choreographic projects for workshop productions. By audition and approval of faculty. May be taken for credit twice. Open to Dance majors only.

170 Dance Performance (1 to 4). Rehearsal and performance in a faculty-choreographed production. By audition only. May be repeated for credit.

171 Dance Workshop (1 to 4) F, W, S. Rehearsal and performance in a student-choreographed production. By audition only. May be repeated for credit.

172 Master of Fine Arts Concert (1 to 4). Rehearsal and performance in a graduate student-choreographed production. Prerequisite: by audition only. May be repeated for credit.

174 UCI Dance Ensemble Performance (1 to 4). Performance with the UCI Dance Ensemble. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

176 UCI Jazz Dance Ensemble (2 to 4). Rehearsal and performance experience in theatrical jazz dance, designed to provide an experience in assimilating various styles of jazz dance and in refining dance performance techniques. Students also master aspects of dance company promotion. Prerequisites: Dance 152A-B-C or consent of instructor. May be taken for credit six times.

177 UCI Spanish Dance Ensemble (1 to 4) F, W, S. Rehearsal and performance with the UCI Spanish Dance Ensemble. Flamenco and other Spanish dance genres are presented throughout the year for campus and off-campus events. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be taken for credit 12 times.

179 UCI Etude Ensemble (4) F, W, S. Repertory and performances by undergraduate Dance majors. Concert presentations on and off campus. Faculty directed, student/faculty choreographed. Prerequisite: by audition only. May be repeated for credit.

180A-B, C Laban Studies (4-4, 4) F, W, S. 180A: Elementary Labanotation and motif writing. Prerequisite: Dance 21A and 180C. 180B: Intermediate Labanotation and work with Laban Writer software. Prerequisite: Dance 180A or consent of instructor. 180C: Laban movement analysis. Prerequisite: Dance 21A. Open to Dance majors only.

185 Critical Issues in Dance (4). Course may be offered online. Critical thinking and writing about dance, with a section on dance criticism and a major emphasis on persuasive writing about significant issues in the dance world. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement and Dance 90A-B-C. Open to Dance majors only.

193 Selected Topics in Dance (1 to 4). Directed group studies of topics in dance. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

197 Independent Study (1 to 4) F, W, S. Individual independent projects in experimental laboratory, library, field, performance, under instructor's direction. Students can receive conceptual, creative, and theoretical instruction in the successful completion of a written report or performance. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

199 Senior Thesis (4) F, W, S. Directed research or creative activity for senior Dance majors. Research consists of a substantial essay on dance history, research in dance science, or the creation of original or reconstructed choreography. Pass/Not Pass only. May be repeated for credit.

GRADUATE

NOTE: Some courses are not offered every year. Please check with the department advisor.

201 Seminar in Kinesiology for Dance (4). Introduction to the anatomical, biomechanical, and physiological principles of dance movement. Prerequisite: Dance 100 or consent of instructor.

210 Graduate Studio: World Dance (2) F, W, S. Principles, techniques, and styles of selected genres of world dance such as those of Mexico, Spain, Japan, or other cultures. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be taken for credit six times.

222 Musical Resources (4). Detailed study of music as it relates to dance. Historical overview of musical form, style, and other elements. Analysis of various affinities between music and dance. Practical applications. Prerequisite: Dance 221 or consent of instructor.

225 Seminar in the Teaching of Dance Techniques (4). Principles and theories of teaching dance techniques. Supervised presentation and teaching of technique class.

231A-B-C Graduate Studio: Ballet (2-2-2) F, W, S. Advanced ballet, pointe work, and performance style: principles of the classical ballet with an emphasis on technique. By audition only. May be repeated for credit.

241A-B-C Graduate Studio: Modern (2-2-2) F, W, S. Advanced modern dance: synthesis of fundamentals and performance technique. Aims to bring students to the preprofessional level. By audition only. May be repeated for credit.

251A-B-C Graduate Studio: Jazz (2-2-2) F, W, S. Principles of jazz dance and contemporary forms, incorporating the personal views of the instructor. By audition only. May be repeated for credit.

252A-B-C Graduate Studio: Tap (2-2-2) F, W, S. An overview of tap concentrating on the development of various technique forms using basic and intermediate principles. May be taken for credit four times.

261A-B Graduate Seminar in Choreography (4-4) F, W. Graduate work in dance composition emphasizing the individual aesthetic. Assignments in movement discovery, solo and group forms, with the main emphasis on independent work. May be repeated for credit.

264 Screendance (4). Overview of dance for film and choreography for the camera. Aesthetics of creating dance for the screen. Approaches for delivery of dance films to an audience, including projection, DVD, Web, and mobile devices. A final dance film project is required. Prerequisite: Dance 281 or consent of instructor.

265 Performance Capture (4). Projects in performance capture, motion capture, motion tracking, and computer animation. Introduction to techniques for sensing and recording human movement and transforming the result into digital representations using computer technology. Discussion of aesthetic issues related to movement representation. Choreographic projects. Prerequisites: Dance 264 and 281, or consent of instructor.

276 Digital Intermedia Performance (4). An experiential introduction to intermedia performance, with a focus on interactivity and improvisation, emphasizing hands-on experience and creative production with digital tools. Working in interdisciplinary teams, students are responsible for completing a series of digital performance projects.

281 Dance and Video Technology (4). Introduction to video and audio documentation of dance performance. Integrating dance performance within the film aesthetic. Techniques and technologies of video cameras, formats, editing, and projection. Overview of video compression and DVD authoring. Formerly Dance 281A.

282 Seminar in Movement Analysis (4). Theories of movement analysis and nonverbal communication applied to dance.

283 Critical Issues in Dance (4). Reading, writing, discussing, and presenting key issues that relate to dance studies. Basics of dance analysis and criticism. Special emphasis on effective ways of defining, clarifying, and arguing for points of view. Prerequisite: Dance 284.

284 Bibliography and Research (4). Understanding the field of dance studies, available resources, research methods, and academic formats in preparation for thesis writing.

285 Graduate Projects (4). Projects may be educational, choreographic, scientific, historical, or philosophical in scope and must have faculty advisor approval. May be taken for credit six times.

286 Thesis (4). Substantial research in a topic approved by the student's graduate committee. Results of the research must be written in approved thesis style. Prerequisite: consent of department. May be taken for credit six times.

287 Graduate Lectures in Dance (1 to 4). A series of lectures and discussions of announced topics in dance. Content may be from history, ethnology, notation, medicine, music, or other areas in the field. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

296 Proseminar in Dance History (4). Discussion seminar with emphasis on reading and thinking about problems in dance history; presentation of oral and written reports. Topics vary. May be taken for credit twice.

297 Directed Reading (1 to 4). Topic to be approved by instructor. Paper required. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

399 University Teaching (4). Limited to Teaching Assistants. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. May be repeated for credit.