DEPARTMENT OF DRAMA

249 Drama Building; (949) 824-6614
http://drama.arts.uci.edu/
Eli Simon, Department Chair

Faculty / Undergraduate Program / Graduate Program / Courses

The Bachelor of Arts program in Drama combines broad liberal study and comprehensive training in several subdisciplines of drama. Each Drama major studies and practices in each of several mutually related areas of the theatre: performance, literature, history, criticism, design, stage management, and production. The curriculum is structured to relate studio practices, technical resources, and production techniques to the development of dramatic literature and current critical theory.

Students should especially note the division of upper-level literature courses into the following clusters—Theory and Criticism (103-109), Periods and Genre (110-119), and Performance and Culture (121-129). These clusters describe differing approaches to the material being presented, whether, for example, analysis and discussion is weighted toward a more strictly defined theoretical and philosophical context, a more traditional historical approach, or an approach that more emphasizes cultural frameworks and issues.

The program is designed for students who, while not necessarily planning to make the theatre their vocation, have a serious interest in the literature, theory, and practice of drama, as well as for students preparing to work professionally in the theatre, often after more specialized training at the graduate level.

The Drama Department also offers a specialized degree for students showing professional aptitude for a career as a musical theatre performer. The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A) in Music Theatre offers the Department's most talented and motivated students the opportunity to train in acting, singing, and dancing for the stage. Students who begin their tenure at UCI as a freshman Drama major may audition for the program upon acceptance into the Music Theatre Workshop, Level III (Drama 143). Transfer students may audition after completing one quarter of Music Theatre Workshop, Level II (Drama 142). B.F.A. students are given priority when enrolling in all music theatre courses. B.F.A. auditions are held three times per year: during Welcome Week and finals week of fall and winter quarters. A grade point average of 3.0 in musical theatre courses completed prior to the B.F.A. audition is required.

The Department of Drama is a member of the University/Resident Theatre Association (U/RTA).

CAREERS FOR THE DRAMA MAJOR

A degree in Drama may or may not lead to professional employment in theatre or film.

Graduates in Drama at UCI have performed in Broadway plays, regional and summer theatres, and in films and television. They serve as artistic directors, designers, art directors, business managers, and performers at more than 100 theatre companies, and as faculty at more than 75 institutions of higher learning.

Not all Drama students become professional theatre artists. Many embark upon careers in law, business, arts management, advertising, and teaching; others pursue further study at UCI or elsewhere.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE IN DRAMA

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: None.

Departmental Requirements for the Major

Introduction to Production Theory (Drama 10); one course from Performance Now (Drama 15) or Culture in Performance (Drama 20A, B, or C); one year in acting (Drama 30A-B-C); one year survey in the development of drama (Drama 40A, B, C); three different courses chosen from Drama 50A, B, C, D, E, F; seven upper-division courses, which must include three courses from Drama 103-129, or 180; Theatre Production (Drama 101) requirements: Freshmen—eight units, of which four units must be completed during the first year of residency at UCI; Transfer Students: Sophomores—six units, of which four units must be completed during the first year of residency at UCI; Juniors and Seniors—four units, which must be completed during the first year of residency at UCI.

Students are required to take Drama 40A, B, C in their sophomore year, after completion of the lower-division writing requirement.

Students entering the Department as freshman must complete the requirement of three courses chosen from Drama 50A, B, C, D, E, F by the end of their junior year. All other students must complete these courses within one year of entering the major.

Sample Program for Freshmen

Fall

Winter

Spring

Drama 30A

Drama 30B

Drama 30C

Drama 10

Drama 15

Drama 50

Drama 101 (2 units)

Drama 101 (2 units)

General Education

Writing 39B

Writing 39C

General Education

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.F.A. DEGREE IN MUSIC THEATRE

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: None.

Departmental Requirements for the Major

Introduction to Production Theory (Drama 10); one course from Performance Now (Drama 15) or Culture in Performance (Drama 20A, B, or C); Acting (Drama 30A-B-C); Development of Drama (Drama 40A, B, C); one of the following courses: Introduction to Costume Design (Drama 50A), Introduction to Scenic Design (Drama 50B), Introduction to Lighting Design (Drama 50C), Introduction to Sound Design (Drama 50D), or Introduction to Stage Management (Drama 50E), History and Theories of Scenography (Drama 50F); University Theatre (a musical production) (Drama 100); Theatre Production (Drama 101) requirements: Freshmen—eight units, of which four units must be completed during the first year of residency at UCI; Transfer Students: Sophomores—six units, of which four units must be completed during the first year of residency at UCI; Juniors and Seniors—four units, which must be completed during the first year of residency at UCI; one Dramatic Literature course chosen from Drama 103-109, 110-119, 121-129, or 180; Music Theatre Acting (Drama 136); Music Theatre Workshop, Level II (Drama 142); Music Theatre Workshop, Level III (Drama 143A, B, C); Music Theatre Workshop, Level IV (Drama 144); Music Theatre Singing (taken three times) (Drama 145); New York Satellite Program-Preparation (Drama 146); History of the American Musical Theatre (Drama 148A, B, C); Music Proficiency for Actors (Drama 149); Script and Score (Drama 176); Song Repertoire (Drama 177); complete A, B, and C from either Music Theatre Movement (Drama 182A, B, C) or Music Theatre Dance (Drama 183A, B, C) in any combination; plus each of the following courses when in residence in the New York Satellite Program: NYSP-Acting (Drama 190), NYSP-Dance (Drama 191); NYSP-Singing (Drama 192); NYSP-Performance (Drama 193); NYSP-UCI Residency (Drama 194); plus two ballet classes, one tap class, and one jazz class in Dance.

Application Process to Declare the Major: Students who begin their tenure at UCI as a freshman Drama major may audition for the program upon acceptance into the Music Theatre Workshop, Level III (Drama 143). Transfer students may audition after completing one quarter of Music Theatre Workshop, Level II (Drama 142).

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS PROGRAMS

Honors in Acting Program

Admission to the Honors in Acting Program requires both eligibility and a special audition. The eligibility requirements for sophomore-level transfer students and native UCI students are (1) at least one year in good standing as a UCI Drama major; (2) completion of Drama 130 or Drama 136 and at least one section of either Drama 135 or Drama 142, all at UCI; (3) honors students must possess and maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.2, with a GPA of 3.4 or higher in all acting courses; (4) performance in at least three official UCI Drama productions; (5) completion of six units of Drama 101 (Production/Crew); and (6) completion of the eligibility form.

The eligibility requirements for junior-level transfer students are (1) one year in good standing as a UCI Drama major; (2) completion of Drama 130 or Drama 136 at UCI; (3) honors students must possess and maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.2, with a GPA of 3.4 or higher in all acting courses; (4) completed performance in at least one official UCI Drama production; (5) completion of four units of Drama 101; and (6) completion of eligibility form.

A student's audition will determine final admission to the Honors in Acting program. Only truly exceptional students, no more than 10 to 20 percent of those eligible, will be admitted. The Honors auditions, for eligible candidates only, are held at the end of fall quarter and by special arrangement. Auditions will consist of a standard presentation: one classical and one modern monologue, totaling no more than three minutes.

Honors in Acting Program students receive (1) the "Honors in Acting" notation on their official transcript at graduation; and (2) nomination and recommendation for national University/Resident Theatre Association (U/RTA) auditions. Honors in Acting students may also be eligible to join M.F.A. Acting students in on-campus auditions for professional theatres and attend M.F.A. Actors' "Dynamics" classes.

Honors in Design/Technology Program

The Honors in Design/Technology Program provides the opportunity for Drama majors to concentrate on the study and practice of scenery, costume, lighting, sound design, or technology. Honors in Design/Technology students study basic and advanced design and production techniques, participate in classes with graduate design students, and may serve as an assistant to a graduate student or faculty designer, or design a production at UCI.

Eligibility requirements are (1) at least one year in good standing at UCI as a Drama major; (2) completion of Drama 50A, B, C, D for Scenic or Costume designers; or completion of 50C, D and two of 50A, B, or F for Sound and Lighting designers (3) completion of at least two courses selected from Drama 50E, upper-division studio courses (Drama 150-162, 167-169, 171, or 179), or graduate-level design courses, including at least one from the design area in which the student is applying for honors; (4) possess and maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.2, with a GPA of 3.4 or higher in all design and production technique courses; (5) completion of four out of eight units of Drama 101 (Theatre Production); and (6) completion of the eligibility form.

Admission to the Honors in Design/Technology Program is competitive. Students may be admitted as early as the winter quarter of their sophomore year. Upon completion of eligibility requirements, the student will schedule an informal portfolio review with a member of the design faculty appropriate to the student's specialty area(s). The selected faculty mentor may recommend that (1) the student is ready to proceed with a formal portfolio review and presentation to the Design faculty, (2) the student rework the content and/or presentation of the material for reconsideration by the faculty mentor, or (3) the student is not ready or able to proceed with Honors in Design/Technology.

Only truly exceptional students will be admitted to Honors in Design/Technology as determined by the Design faculty.

Honors in Design/Technology students receive (1) the "Honors in Design/Technology" notation on their official transcript at graduation; (2) nomination and recommendation for national University/Resident Theatre Association (U/RTA) interviews; and (3) advanced production assignments, which may include an assistant design with a graduate student or faculty designer, a design for a budgeted and technically supported production, or an advanced crafts project for production.

Honors in Design/Technology students are expected to maintain a high level of performance and commitment to their work and the Drama Department. Honors students meet with their faculty mentor at the beginning of every quarter to evaluate their progress and check that all grade, course, and production requirements are being satisfied.

Once admitted into the Honors in Design/Technology Program, students are expected to:

1.   Maintain an overall GPA of a least 3.2, with a GPA of at least 3.4 in all design and production technique courses.

2.   Remain in good standing as a Drama major.

3.   Satisfy any provisional conditions for acceptance into the Honors in Design/Technology program.

4.   Complete production assignments as assigned by the faculty mentor.

5.   Continue to take at least two courses (as enumerated in the eligibility section) or independent studies per year, at least half of which must come from the area of design in which the student is applying for honors.

6.   Maintain the Drama Department's CORE values (download the document at http://drama.arts.uci.edu/docs/CodeOfConduct.doc.

Failure to maintain these expectations, as determined by the Drama faculty, will result in being dismissed from the Honors in Design/Technology program.

For more information contact the Head of Design in Drama.

Honors in Directing Program

The Honors in Directing Program provides the opportunity for Drama majors to concentrate on the study and practice of stage direction. Honors in Directing students study basic and advanced directing techniques, participate in the Directing Laboratory with graduate Directing students, take a course in directorial themes and/or the history of directing, and direct two full plays in the Drama Workshop series. Honors students also have the opportunity to receive credit as the assistant director of a Stage 1 or Stage 2 Department show; as a production internship with a professional theatre company; or for production/direction responsibility with the Playwright's Workshop.

Admission to the Honors in Directing Program is competitive. Candidates must first complete Drama 184 (Directing) and receive instructor approval to enroll in Drama 185 (Advanced Directing). Candidates must apply, as a director, for Drama 198 (Drama Workshop) by submitting a proposal to direct a play in the Drama Workshop series. If the proposal is accepted, the candidate must declare to the Head of Directing that the production is to be counted as an audition for admission to the Honors in Directing Program. A committee of three Drama faculty members, including the Head of Directing, will then see and evaluate the production for clarity of interpretation, unity of style, strength of acting, and ensemble performance, and will examine the candidate's self-evaluation and the evaluations of the director by members of the cast. The Head of Directing will inform the candidate of the committee's decision as to whether or not the candidate is admitted to the Honors Program.

Undergraduate Drama majors can be admitted into the program as early as the winter quarter of their freshman year but no later than the spring quarter of their junior year. Students may be admitted to the program retroactively if all the requirements for Directing Honors have been met by their final year, but only if a faculty committee of three has seen their workshops and agrees to admit the candidate.

To achieve the Honors in Directing distinction, students must fulfill all the courses required of the regular Drama major, with an overall GPA of 3.2 or higher. In addition, students must complete the following courses with a GPA of 3.4 or higher:

1.   Drama 184 (Directing).

2.   Two courses in Drama 185 (Advanced Directing). In this course, undergraduate Directing students present work in the Directing Laboratory along with graduate Directing students.

3.   Two Drama Workshops, one of which must be taken as Drama 198 (Drama Workshop) with the candidate serving as director. The candidate must stage a second Drama Workshop as Drama 199 (Projects in Theater), for which a letter grade is earned.

4.   Four additional units to be satisfied by any of the following: Drama 199 (as a summer internship, approved by the Head of Directing, with the candidate serving a professional theatre company as director, assistant director, or production assistant); Drama 199 (as a production/directing project for Playwright's Workshop); Drama 100 (as assistant director to a faculty director); or Drama 199 (as assistant director to a graduate director's thesis production).

Honors candidates meet with the Head of Directing at the beginning of every quarter to evaluate their progress and to check that all grade and course requirements are being satisfied. Successful graduating seniors will receive the "Honors in Directing" notation on their official transcript and will receive a nomination and recommendation for national University/Resident Theatre Association (U/RTA) interviews.

NOTE: All of the above courses are open to all students even though they may not qualify for the Honors Program.

Honors in Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory Program

The Honors in Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory Program is designed to challenge superior students beyond the scholarly requirements of the Drama major. It provides them with the opportunity to advance their knowledge of dramatic literature, history, and theory and to further develop their writing, analytical, and research skills. An additional purpose of the program is to better prepare students for graduate study in not only dramatic literature, history, and theory, but in all fields in the humanities and social sciences, as well as in law.

Eligibility requirements are (1) completion of Drama 40A, B, C and two courses selected from Drama 103-129 (for upper-division writing credit), or equivalents to these courses from other institutions; (2) possess and maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.2, with a GPA of 3.4 or higher in all dramatic literature, history, and theory courses; and (3) completion of the eligibility form.

Admission to the Honors in Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory Program is competitive. Students must apply to the program prior to the spring quarter of their junior year. Upon completion of eligibility requirements, applicants must submit at least two critical essays, most likely written previously for courses, totaling no more than 30 pages. These essays will be used by the Honors Committee (comprised of the Head of Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory and two additional members of the Drama faculty) to determine admission. Only truly exceptional students (no more than 10 to 20 percent of those eligible) will be admitted.

Beyond fulfilling the regular requirements of the Drama major, honors students must take three additional upper-division courses in dramatic literature, history, and/or theory, one of which must be focused on theory. Upper-division courses in other departments may be used to fulfill these requirements, as long as the Honors Committee approves them.

Honors students must also write an honors thesis, a 30-40 page research paper written under the supervision of a faculty member on a topic chosen by the student. In consultation with the student, the adviser for this project is selected before the end of the fall quarter of the student's senior year. Students develop their projects until the spring quarter when they enter the writing phase. It is only during the spring quarter that students achieve full course credit for their work on the thesis, in the form of an independent study course with their advisor. This independent study is the final course of the program.

Successful graduating seniors will receive the "Honors in Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory" notation on their official transcript.

Honors in Music Theatre

Successful graduating seniors in both the B.A. in Drama and the B.F.A. in Music Theatre can achieve Honors in Music Theatre. An overall GPA of 3.2 or higher is required along with an overall GPA of 3.4 in all music theatre courses. B.F.A. students need to complete all course work listed under "Departmental Requirements for the B.F.A. Major" while B.A. students need to complete the following additional music theatre courses: Music Theatre Workshop, Level II (Drama 142); Music Theatre Workshop, Level III (Drama 143A, B, C); Music Theatre Singing (Drama 145) (taken three times); NYSP-Preparation (Drama 146); History of the American Musical Theatre (Drama 148A, B, C); Music Proficiency for Actors (Drama 149); Script and Score (Drama 176); complete A, B, and C from either Music Theatre Movement (Drama 182A, B, C) or Music Theatre Dance (Drama 183A, B, C) in any combination; NYSP-Acting (Drama 190); NYSP-Dance (Drama 191); NYSP-Singing (Drama 192); NYSP-Performance (Drama 193); NYSP-UCI Residency (Drama 194); plus two ballet classes, one tap class, and one jazz class in Dance.

At graduation, successful Honors students receive the "Honors in Music Theatre" notation on their transcripts.

Honors in Stage Management Program

The Honors in Stage Management Program provides the opportunity for Drama majors to concentrate on the study and practice of stage management. Honors students study basic and advanced stage management techniques, participate in classes with graduate stage managers, work as assistant stage managers with the graduate stage managers on graduate student-directed and faculty-directed productions, and stage manage a graduate student-directed or faculty-directed production at UCI.

Eligibility requirements are (1) minimum one year in good standing at UCI as a Drama major; (2) completion of three of the following: Drama 50A, B, C, D, F or equivalent courses; (3) completion of Drama 50E; (4) possess and maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.2, with a GPA of 3.4 or higher in all stage management and production courses; (5) completion of eight units of Drama 101 (Theatre Production); and (6) completion of the eligibility form.

Admission to the Honors in Stage Management Program is competitive. Students may be admitted as early as the winter quarter of their sophomore year but no later than the spring quarter of their junior year. Only truly exceptional students (no more than 10 to 20 percent of those eligible) will be admitted to the program as determined by the Honors Committee. Upon completion of eligibility requirements, the student will submit to the Honors Committee: (1) two prompt books; (2) a resume including all stage management and production experience; (3) letters of reference from two directors with whom the student has worked; and (4) a written paper on the subject of stage management.

Students receive the "Honors in Stage Management" notation on their final transcript; nomination and recommendation for national University/Resident Theatre Association (U/RTA) interviews; assistant stage manager assignments working with graduate stage managers; and a stage management assignment on a graduate student-directed or faculty-directed production.

Honors candidates meet with the Head of Stage Management at the beginning of every quarter to evaluate their progress.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS PROGRAM

Degree Offered

M.F.A. in Drama, with emphasis in Acting, Directing, Design, or Stage Management.

A graduate emphasis in Feminist Studies also is available. Refer to the Department of Women's Studies section of the Catalogue for information.

Admission

Applicants for admission to the degree program must meet the general requirements for admission to graduate study and hold a B.A., B.F.A., or higher degree.

Applicants must submit dossiers of biographical information and theatrical experience, together with photographs, essays, reviews, production books, and portfolios, as appropriate.

Normally an audition is required for all applicants who intend to follow the curriculum in Acting. UCI coordinates its auditions with the University/Resident Theatre Association (U/RTA), and conducts auditions, both for U/RTA finalists and UCI applicants, in New York, Chicago, Las Vegas, and Irvine during January and February. Other U/RTA audition sites may be considered. Interviews for applicants in Directing, in Design, and in Stage Management also are required.

General Degree Requirements

Normally three years of residence is required. Each candidate must enroll for three courses each quarter for nine quarters, exclusive of summer sessions.

The normative time to degree for students in the M.F.A. program is three years. Residence is required. The maximum time to degree can be extended to four years only through petition to the Head of the Program for extenuating circumstances. Students who do not complete the degree in four years will be dropped from the program.

During the first year of residence each candidate will prepare, for credit, two graduate projects, in acting, directing, design, stage management, theatrical research, or a combination of two of these. Satisfactory completion of these projects, as determined by the faculty, is prerequisite to entering the second year of the program.

The required thesis normally consists of directing, designing, stage managing, or playing a principal role in a major production, and collecting in essay form the evidences of research, analysis, and judgments which formed a part of the production experience.

Each graduate student is expected to participate in productions throughout residence at UCI.

Specific course requirements must be satisfied in one of the following four areas:

Acting

Nine graduate studios in acting (Drama 200), taken in tandem with nine graduate studios in voice (Drama 201), stage speech (Drama 202), stage movement (Drama 203), and voice/movement dynamics (Drama 206); three master classes in acting (selected from various topics offered in Drama 219); one seminar in script analysis and research (Drama 235); one seminar in dramatic literature, performance theory, criticism, history of theatre, or contemporary theatre (Drama 220-225, or 230); six graduate projects, of which two may be professional internships (Drama 240 or 295). A total of 110 quarter units in graduate or approved upper-division undergraduate courses must be completed with a grade of at least B in each course.

Design

Seven graduate studios in design seminars (Drama 255); six courses in graduate projects (Drama 240), one of which may be a professional internship (Drama 295); two elective courses (course numbered 100 and above); four courses in dramatic literature, performance theory, criticism, or history of theater (Drama 220, 221, 223, 230, 248, 164A, 164B, or other substitutions as approved by mentor); three courses in design techniques (Drama 258-282); three foundation courses (Drama 251A, B, C) taken during the first year of study; eight Colloquium courses (Drama 259); one Survival and Professional Practice in Design (Drama 256). A total of 112 quarter units in graduate or approved upper-division undergraduate courses must be completed with a grade of at least B in each course.

Directing

Nine graduate studios in directing (Drama 211); three courses in development of theatre (Drama 120A, B, C)—faculty program head may approve substitutions depending on student's prior academic experience; two courses in acting (Drama 200); one seminar in script analysis and research (Drama 235); one course in conceptualization and collaboration (Drama 245); two seminars in dramatic literature, performance theory, criticism, theatre history (Drama 220-223, 248); seven projects, of which one is the thesis, one is a project in theatre production, one may be a professional internship, and three must be directed (non-thesis) productions; two or three electives. A total of 108 quarter units in graduate or approved upper-division undergraduate courses must be completed with a grade of at least B in each course.

Stage Management

Seven graduate studios in stage management (Drama 254); one thesis project course (Drama 257E); seven courses in graduate projects (Drama 240); one professional internship course (Drama 295); three elective courses in graduate-level (Drama 200+) or upper-division (Drama 100-199) as approved by the faculty advisor; three courses in foundations in theatre (Drama 251A, B, C); two courses in production techniques (Drama 150-159, 162-164, 167-168, 170-171, 260A, B-262, 265-266); one seminar in script analysis and research (Drama 235); one course in dramatic literature, criticism, contemporary theatre, or history of music theatre (Drama 220, 221, 230, or 248). A total of 112 quarter units in graduate or approved upper-division undergraduate courses must be completed with a grade of at least B in each course.

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAM

Degree Offered

Ph.D. in Drama and Theatre.

This is a joint program offered by the UCI Department of Drama and the UCSD Department of Theatre and Dance.

Preparation

Students with a B.A. (minimum GPA of 3.5), M.A., or M.F.A. degree in Drama and Theatre are eligible for admission to the doctoral program. Students with training in literature (or another area in the humanities) will also be considered, provided they can demonstrate a background in drama or theatre. Experience in one of the creative activities of theatre (acting, directing, playwriting, design, dramaturgy) enhances a student's chances of admission.

All applicants are required to take the Graduate Record Examination and to submit samples of their critical writing.

While not required for admission, a working knowledge of a second language is highly desirable (see Language Requirement).

Course of Study

Students are required to take a minimum of 144 units, which is equivalent to four years of full-time study (full-time students must enroll for a minimum of 12 units each quarter). Forty of these units are taken in required seminars; the balance is made up of elective seminars, independent study and research projects (including preparing the three qualifying papers), and dissertation research. Students must take a minimum of one seminar per year in the UCSD Department of Theatre and Dance. The program of study makes it possible for students to take a significant number of elective courses and independent studies both with faculty in Drama and Theatre and in other departments.

Required Courses

Students must take a minimum of 12 units (three seminars) each of Drama 290 (Dramatic Literature and Theatre History Prior to 1900) and 291 (Dramatic Literature and Theatre History, 1900 to Present), and 16 units (four seminars) of 292 (Cultural and Critical Theory).

All graduate courses may be repeated when the topic varies. Descriptions of the topics to be treated in a given academic year are published by the Department in the fall. Enrollment in each course requires the consent of the instructor. The courses are limited to registered doctoral students.

These 10 required seminars must be completed by all students, including those who have an M.A. or an M.F.A. degree, before the end of the third year. In addition, students must pass comprehensive examinations at the end of their first and second years.

Drama 293 (Directed Studies) and 294 (Dissertation Research) are also required.

Comprehensive Examinations

In the first year, students prepare for the Written Comprehensive Examination, which is based on a reading list of approximately 150 titles ranging from the Ancient Greeks to the present. Students take this examination at the beginning of the fall quarter of their second year. (Comprehensive examinations are scheduled at the beginning of fall quarter in order to allow students the summer to prepare.) Students who fail the Written Comprehensive may retake it no later than the first week of winter quarter of their second year. Students who fail the Written Comprehensive for a second time are dismissed from the program.

In their second year, students prepare for the Oral Comprehensive Examination. The reading list for this examination is designed to permit students to acquire a knowledge of their dissertation subject area, broadly conceived. The reading list is compiled by the student and the dissertation advisor, in consultation with other members of the faculty, as appropriate; the reading list must be established by the end of winter quarter of the second year. Students take the Oral Comprehensive at the beginning of the fall quarter of their third year. Students also submit a dissertation prospectus (approximately five pages) when they take this examination. Students who fail the Oral Comprehensive may retake it no later than the first week of winter quarter of their third year. Students who fail the Oral Comprehensive for a second time are dismissed from the program.

Advancement to Candidacy: Three Qualifying Papers

Students normally select a dissertation advisor during their second year and must do so before the end of spring quarter of that year. In consultation with the dissertation advisor and other faculty members, students develop topics for three qualifying papers, which are written during their third year. The three qualifying papers—one long (approximately 50 pages) and two short (approximately 30 pages each)—must be completed by the end of the third year; these completed papers provide the basis for the Oral Qualifying Examination. Students write the long paper under the direction of their dissertation advisor; it is understood that the long paper is preparatory to the dissertation. The short papers deal with other related topics, subject to the approval of the student's advisors; the two short papers are understood as engaging in exploring the larger contexts of the dissertation. The normative time for students to pass the Qualifying Examination and advance to candidacy is at the end of their third year; students must advance to candidacy no later than the end of fall quarter of their fourth year. Once advanced to candidacy, students write their dissertation which, upon completion, is defended in a final oral examination.

Students may select a dissertation advisor from either the UCI Department of Drama or the UCSD Department of Theatre and Dance. All UCI doctoral dissertation committees must include at least one faculty member from UCSD.

Language Requirement

Students are required to complete an advanced research project using primary and secondary material in a second language (materials may include live and/or recorded performance; interviews with artists, critics, and scholars; and other non-documentary sources, as well as more conventional textual sources). This requirement may be satisfied by writing a seminar paper or a qualifying paper (see Advancement to Candidacy above) that makes extensive use of materials in a second language. The second-language requirement must be satisfied before the end of the third year. This requirement will not be waived for students who are bi- or multilingual; all students are required to do research-level work in more than one language.

It is assumed that students will have acquired a second language before entering the doctoral program, although second-language proficiency is not a requirement for admission. While students may study one or more second languages while at UCI or UCSD, language courses may not be counted toward doctoral program requirements.

Teaching

Students are required to teach a minimum of four quarters. No more than eight units of apprentice teaching may be counted toward the required 144 units.

Departmental Ph.D. Time-Limit Policies

Students must advance to candidacy by the end of the fall quarter of their fourth year. Departmental normative time for completion of the degree is five years; total registered time in the Ph.D. program at UCI or UCSD cannot exceed seven years.

Financial Support

Ph.D. students entering the program with a B.A. may be supported (either by teaching assignments or fellowships) for five years. Students who have an M.A. and have been given transfer credit may be supported for four years. Such support depends upon the funds available, the number of students eligible, and the student's rate of progress.

Courses in Drama

(Schedule of Classes designation: Drama)

LOWER-DIVISION

10 Introduction to Production Theory (4). An introduction to modern production techniques as practiced in realizing scenic designs. Equipment, theories, techniques, and history of production practices in the technical theatre; class instruction integrated with practical applications.

11 The Rock and Roll Spectacle Show (4). A thorough overview to the development and cultural significance of the Rock 'n Roll Spectacle show. Focus on historical and recent developments of the spectacle show, trends in the aesthetics of the field, and various sub-genres. (IV)

14 Performing Rock 'n Roll (4). Explores major movements in the history of rock 'n roll in terms of performance, not virtuosity necessarily of the performers as musicians, rather as performances of aesthetics in modes of embodied ideology, iconoclastic spectacle, mixed media fashion, and subcultural formation.

15 Performance Now (4). Exposes students to what is most current in the world of performance and theatre. Begins with a series of lectures on the idea of performance, and the various theories that frame it. Drama and Music Theatre majors have first consideration for enrollment. (IV)

16 Performing Culture (4). Culture, aesthetics, and ideology (combined in the concept "subculture") work to fashion social identities. Using theories and methodologies of performance studies, with an emphasis on American culture, this course explores why and how culture is reinforced through performance. (IV)

20A, B, C Culture in Performance (4-4-4). A three-quarter foundation series exploring the rich depth of theatre, drama, and other genres of performance across a wide variety of worldwide forms, for performer and audience. (IV)

30A-B-C Acting (4-4-4). A one-year course in basic acting technique and discipline. (NOTE: All acting classes require strict adherence to stage discipline; unexcused class absences, for example, are not permitted.) 30A: Stage technique and stage discipline. Freeing vocal and physical movement and liberating emotional power. Elementary stage movement and voice. Elimination of regionalisms in speech. Overcoming stage fright. Readings in acting theory. 30B: Improvisations and scenes. Rehearsal and presentation of at least two scenes with different partners. Developing stage contact with tactics in a "play" situation. Prerequisite: Drama 30A. 30C: Characterization, scenes and auditioning. Development of character in at least three rehearsed scenes from different plays. Script analysis and performance technique. Preparation of audition pieces. The profession of acting. Prerequisites: Drama 30A-B. May be taken for credit twice. Drama and Music Theatre majors have first consideration for enrollment.

34 Movement for Actors (4). Introduces the basics of stage movement for actors: the theory and practical application of physical relaxation, centering, focus, and balance. The body is trained to express a wide range of creative impulses for performance. May be taken for credit three times.

35 Speech for the Theatre (4). A course aimed at (1) improving natural, clear, unaffected speech and (2) eliminating negative habits and regional accents: exercises for physical tension, vocal support, tone production, vocal quality, and articulation. Open to Arts majors only. May be repeated for credit.

40A, B, C Development of Drama (4, 4, 4). A one-year lecture-discussion course (each quarter may be taken independently) in the development of Western Drama, concentrating on the drama's intellectual, social, and artistic foundations. About 10 plays and supplementary critical material are read each quarter. 40A: Greek Drama through Shakespeare. Readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and the anonymous playwrights of the medieval theatre. 40B: Restoration Drama through Ibsen. Readings from Neoclassic, Romantic, and Naturalistic European playwrights in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Molière, Racine, Congreve, Goethe, Ibsen, and Chekhov are included. 40C: Contemporary Drama. Post Naturalistic theatre: Expressionism, Epic Theatre, Theatre of the Absurd, and Contemporary American Theatre. Among the playwrights studied are Stein, Shaw, Pirandello, Ionesco, Beckett, Williams, Brecht, Weiss, Albee, Churchill, and Duras. Same as Comparative Literature CL 40A, B, C. Drama and Music Theatre majors have first consideration for enrollment. (IV, VIII)

50A Introduction to Costume Design (4). An introduction to the process and procedures employed by the costume designer for the theatre. The elements of design are discussed in the context of character development, historical period, and style. Exercises extend to drawing, rendering, and investigation of human proportions. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

50B Introduction to Scenic Design (4). Introduction to the principles and practice of scenic design. Weekly problems include research into various periods and styles of production with an emphasis on the conceptual idea. Perspective drawing, rendering, and model building are covered in studio exercises and assignments. Prerequisite: Drama 10. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

50C Introduction to Lighting Design (4). Introduction to the principles, theories, and equipment employed by the lighting designer for the stage. Areas of investigation include history, technology, and script analysis. Detailed studio attention is given to the theory and practice of design. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

50D Introduction to Sound Design (4). Principles, theories, equipment use, and terminology employed by the sound designer for the stage. Areas of study include history, technology, and script analysis. Focuses on the theory and practice of design. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

50E Introduction to Stage Management (4). A basic study of theatrical, dance, and opera stage management practices, forms, and methods, from first script reading to closing night. Opportunity to observe professionals at work in regional and touring situations as available. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

50F History and Theories of Scenography (4) F, W, S. Explores the aesthetics of the stage and the evolution of scenery and costume in live performance as inspiration for today's theatre analysts. Topics include shared vocabulary, historical trends, shifts in approaches, and focus briefs on leaders in the field. Prerequisite: Drama 10. Drama and Music Theatre majors have first consideration for enrollment.

65 Music Theatre Workshop I (2) F, W. Basic vocal technique and characterization of musical theatre repertoire explored. Admission by audition only. May be taken for credit twice.

83 Directorial Techniques (4). Exercises introduce students to standard directorial practices for shaping a play, such as table work, blocking, business, and actor coaching. Students take charge of sample rehearsals, guiding casts through exercises, followed by peer review, and instructor critique. Prerequisites: Drama 30A-B-C.

UPPER-DIVISION

100 University Theatre (4). Rehearsal and performance in a faculty-directed production. By audition only. May be repeated for credit.

101 Theatre Production. The production courses are offered to give students the opportunity to participate in departmental productions. Students engage in the production and construction of designed work as well as its applied execution during performance. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be taken for credit for a maximum of 24 units provided productions change.

101A Theatre Production: Costume (1 to 6)

101B Theatre Production: Scenic (1 to 6)

101C Theatre Production: Lighting (1 to 6)

101D Theatre Production: Stage Management (1 to 8)

101E Theatre Production: Audio (1 to 6)

101S Theatre Production: Theatre Management (1 to 6)

103-109: THEORY AND CRITICISM

103 Lectures in Dramatic Literature (4). Courses include Medieval and Tudor Drama, Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama, Shakespeare, Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama, Modern British Drama, Modern American Drama, Tragedy, and Comedy. Prerequisite when offered for upper-division writing: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated, provided topic changes. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

109 Special Topics in Theory and Criticism (4). Discussion of recent major trends and ideas in critical theory, concentrating on in-depth readings and lectures in particular facets of theory and criticism: Derrida, Butler, Lacan, Deleuze, and others. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

110-119: PERIODS AND GENRES

110 Special Topics in Classical Dramas (4). Designed to introduce students to various classical traditions—early Greek and Roman theatres, to be sure, but also, by way of comparison, the classical traditions of non-European cultures. Prerequisites: Drama 40A, B, C and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

112 Special Topics in Early Modern and Neoclassical Theatre (4). Investigates aspects of European theatre and culture in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries; individual courses may focus on specific topics within this broad expanse. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

116 Special Topics in Nineteenth-Century Dramas (4). Looks at the various trends and conventions of theatres in the nineteenth century, both Euro-American and beyond, paying special attention to the culture and political milieu within which these various traditions appeared. Prerequisites: Drama 40A, B, C and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

118 Special Topics in Modern and Contemporary Drama (4). An investigation into the many forms and permutations of modern (1880-1945), and contemporary (since 1945) drama, paying special attention to the historical and philosophical interpretations of text and performance. Prerequisites: Drama 40A, B, C and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

121-129: PERFORMANCE AND CULTURE

121 Introduction to Asian Theatre (4) W. An introduction to some of the major traditional theatrical forms and dramatic texts from India, China, and Japan. Other than dramatic texts (in English translation), attention is also paid to theory, history, and performance styles of traditional Asian theatre. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

122 Asian American Theatre (4). An introduction to the history and development of Asian American theatre and drama. Besides play analysis, special attention is also paid to the history and politics of Asian American identity and experience, as well as to aspects of theatrical performance. Prerequisites: Drama 40A, B, C and 120A, B, C. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

123 Multicultural Theatres (4). A study of the history, culture, aesthetics, and literature of various traditional performing arts and their connections to the contemporary multicultural society. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

126 African American Film and Drama (4). A critical investigation of films and plays written by African Americans, with emphasis on dramaturgical and cinematic strategies, individual and collective representation, and the legacy of African American political struggle. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

129 Advanced Topics in Performance (4). Addresses particular issues in theatre and performance that typically lie outside of regular course offerings. May address such issues as the theatre of the Avant Garde, performing gender, transversality and performance, body art, installation and performance art, among other possible topics. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

130 Intermediate Acting (4). Rehearsal and presentation of scenes from contemporary material. Focus on connection with scene partner, playing actions, and text analysis. Introduction to the credibility and theatricality of characterization and style. Prerequisites: Drama 30A-B-C with an average grade of B or better; for transfer students: one year of beginning acting with an average grade of B or better. May be taken for credit twice. Formerly Drama 130A. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

132A-B-C Writing for Performance (4-4-4). 132A: Completion of a full-length play or its equivalent; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 132B: Development of student work beyond what is normally produced in Drama 132A. The goal is to produce a polished, high-quality, stage-ready work through workshop exercises, revision, and rewriting. Prerequisites: Drama 132A, portfolio, and consent of instructor. 132C: The goal is to produce work previously written in Drama 132A-B, under the supervision of instructor. Students, working under "real-life" conditions, may not rely on departmental resources to produce their work. Prerequisites: Drama 132B, portfolio, and consent of instructor. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

135 Master Classes in Acting (1 to 4). Advanced acting in specialized areas including acting for the camera: situation comedy, commercials; auditioning and industry preparation; Shakespeare; Molière; Chekov; improvisation; advanced movement and voice and speech for the actor; self-starting; stage combat; repertory acting, singing; comedy; clowning; and masks. Prerequisites: grade of B or better in Drama 130 (or Drama 130A) and consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

136 Music Theatre Acting (4) F. An acting class exclusive to the students in the B.F.A. in Music Theatre program. Prerequisites: Drama 30A-B-C. Open to Music Theatre majors only.

142 Music Theatre Workshop II (4) F, W, S. A workshop in audition technique and song interpretation. Admission by audition only. May be taken for credit four times.

143A, B, C Music Theatre Workshop III (4, 4, 4) F, W. Scene study and song repertoire examined by era for the advanced Music Theatre student. 143A: 1800s-1940. 143B: 1940s-1970s. 143C: 1970s-present. Prerequisites: Drama 142 and audition.

144 Music Theatre Workshop IV (4) F, S. A performance class concentrating on role building. Work culminates with in-class performances of abbreviated versions of musicals. Open only to B.F.A. in Music Theatre students and Drama graduate students. Prerequisites: for B.F.A. students, Drama 143A, B, C and audition; for Drama graduate students, audition. May be taken for credit four times.

145 Music Theatre Singing (1) F, W, S. Private weekly voice lessons for the advanced musical theatre student. Corequisite: Drama 143 or 144. May be taken for credit nine times. Open to Music Theatre majors only.

146 NYSP-Preparation (4) W. Class preparation for the New York Satellite Program (NYSP)—an immersion experience in New York City for the musical theatre performer. Admission is by audition and the following prerequisites: Drama 30C and two quarters of Drama 148A, B, or C (if the 148 prerequisite is not complete at the time of auditions, student must enroll during the fall and winter quarters in the same year as the trip to New York); senior Drama majors must have successfully completed Drama 40C and 120C; non-Drama majors must have sophomore standing or higher and must carefully plan their course schedule as many spring quarter classes cannot be taken while part of the NYSP. May be taken for credit twice. Formerly Drama 146A.

148A, B, C History of American Musical Theatre (4, 4, 4). A survey of the influential artists who produce, write, direct, and perform on America's musical stages. 148A: 1700s-1940s. 148B: 1940s-1970s. 148C: 1970s-present day. Concurrent with Drama 248A, B, C. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

149 Music Proficiency for Actors (2) F, S. A musicianship class introducing basic musical terminology, theory, and sight singing skills. May be taken for credit twice. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

150 Costume Production Techniques (4). Studio instruction in pattern making, draping, millinery, and construction techniques. Prerequisite: Drama 50A. May be repeated for credit. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

157 Lighting Composition (4). Provides an opportunity for students to pursue stage lighting composition in a studio atmosphere. Laboratory practice includes weekly exercises in style and genre. Emphasis is placed on the realization of conceptual ideas. Prerequisite: Drama 50C. May be repeated for credit. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

158 Studio in Theatre Design (4). Examines the various functions of scenery and costume: locale, historical period, mood, and atmosphere, with special assignments in each area. Discussion of problems in scenic metaphors and visualization, with emphasis on techniques of planning and presentation (e.g., floor plans, models, and rendering). Prerequisite: Drama 50A or 50B, or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

159 Proseminar in Theatre Design (4). Content varies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

160 Light Plotting Techniques (4). A study of the development of theatrical lighting plots from initial conceptualization through final documentation. Areas of emphasis include script analysis, visual approaches, equipment selection and compositional qualities of light. Prerequisites: Drama 50C and 157. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

164A-B History of Costume (4-4). A study of the development of dress and the influence of cultural factors on clothing. 164A: From the time of Egyptians to Early Baroque. 164B: From late Baroque to World War I. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

167 Fabric Modification Techniques (4). Exploration of various dying, printing, painting, and texture modification techniques. Prerequisite: Drama 50A. Offered every other year. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

168 Theatrical Mask Techniques (4). Design and construction of theatrical masks including paper mache, leather, plastics, and latex. Projects employ traditional and contemporary techniques. Prerequisite: Drama 50A. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

169 Costume Rendering Techniques (4). Development of costume rendering skills and techniques. Explores collage, pastel, and ink and emphasizes watercolor. Prerequisite: Drama 50A. May be taken for credit twice. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

171 Production Management (4). An examination of stage and production management. Areas of study include production organization, management practices, production scheduling, rehearsal and performance duties, union regulations, and production touring. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

173A Theatre Orchestra (2)

175 Staging Shakespeare (4). A seminar in Shakespearean staging practice, both Elizabethan and contemporary. Students prepare a hypothetical production book for an assigned play as it could have been produced at the Globe Theatre in 1610, and a proposal to produce the same play in a contemporary manner today. Prerequisite: Drama 184. May be repeated for credit. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

176 Script and Score (4) S. A form and analysis seminar discussing the libretto and score of landmark musicals. Prerequisites: two quarters of Drama 148A, B, or C. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

177 Song Repertoire (2). F, W, S. A song coaching class culminating in a song recital or showcase. Each quarter will feature a different composer, lyricist, or musical style. Open only to B.F.A. Music Theatre students. May be taken for credit six times.

179 Intermediate Sound Design (4). A project-based analysis of the principles of sound design for the theatre. Projects are executed in the sound design studio and may include sound manipulation and recording. Emphasis is placed on the realization of conceptual ideas. Prerequisite: Drama 50D. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

180 Contemporary Dramatic Criticism and Theory (4). Reading and analysis of theories and critical approaches to contemporary theatre: Brecht, Artaud, and others who have contributed to the form and idea of the modern theatre. Writing of assigned exercises in dramatic criticism. Prerequisite when offered for upper-division writing: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

181 Acting Theory (4). A study of the theory of acting, with readings in Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, Shakespeare, Diderot, Stanislavsky, Brecht, Strasberg, Meisner, Grotowski, and other theorists, ancient to contemporary. Prerequisites: Drama 130 and junior standing. Concurrent with Drama 224. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

182A, B, C Music Theatre Movement (4, 4, 4) F, W. An exploration of various dance styles from different eras of the musical theatre stage for the actor/singer. 182A: 1800s-1940s. 182B: 1940s-1970s. 182C: 1970s-present day. Prerequisites: Drama 65 or 142 and audition. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

183A, B, C Music Theatre Dance (4, 4, 4) F, W. An exploration of various dance style from different eras of the musical theatre stage for the advanced dancer. 183A: 1800s-1940s. 183B: 1940s-1970s. 183C: 1970s-present day. Prerequisites: Drama 65 or 142 and audition. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

184 Directing (4). The principles of stage directing, covering the director's functions in the areas of interpretation, composition, coaching, and styling a theatrical production. Directing exercises and projects; the final project is the preparation of a hypothetical proposal for a play production. Prerequisites: Drama 30A-B-C; Drama 40A-B-C; or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Formerly Drama 170. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

185 Advanced Directing (4). A seminar in directorial organization and research. Student prepares a textual and dramaturgical analysis, a production timetable, and a hypothetical production book of an assigned play. Prerequisite: Drama 184. May be repeated for credit. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

190 NYSP-Acting (4) S. New York Satellite Program acting classes taught by guest faculty in New York. Prerequisite: Drama 146. May be taken for credit twice.

191 NYSP-Dance (4) S. New York Satellite Program dance classes in ballet, tap, jazz, and musical theatre styles taught by guest faculty in New York. Prerequisite: Drama 146. May be taken for credit twice.

192 NYSP-Singing (4) S. New York Satellite Program private and group lessons in musical theatre singing taught by guest faculty in New York. Prerequisite: Drama 146. May be taken for credit twice.

193 NYSP-Performance (4) S. New York Satellite Program rehearsals and public, staged readings of original musicals in New York. Prerequisite: Drama 146. May be taken for credit twice.

194 NYSP-UCI Residency (4) S. New York Satellite Program follow-up classes and performances back on Irvine campus upon the return from New York. Prerequisite: Drama 146. May be taken for credit twice. Formerly Drama 146B.

195 Music Theatre Dance-Special Topics (1 to 4). Advanced dance classes in specialized areas including the dance styles of a choreographer (de Mille, Fosse, Robbins, Tune, Stroman), genre (tap, ballroom, jazz, swing, hip-hop), or in musical theatre choreography. Prerequisites: one quarter of Drama 182A, B, or C or 183A, B, or C and audition. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Open to Drama and Music Theatre majors only.

198 Drama Workshop (1 to 4). By audition or accepted proposal only. Consists of directing or acting in a regularly scheduled Drama Workshop production and submitting a final evaluation of all work performed. Workshop productions must be proposed by directors on departmental forms, and each project must be approved by the Workshop Committee. May be repeated for credit.

199 Project in Theatre (1 to 4). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

GRADUATE

200 Graduate Studio: Acting (4) F, W, S. Work in graduate studio taken in tandem with graduate studios in stage voice (Drama 201), stage speech (Drama 202), and stage movement (Drama 203). May be repeated for credit.

201 Graduate Studio: Voice (1) F, W, S. Graduate studio in vocal production for actors. May be repeated for credit.

202 Graduate Studio: Speech (1). Graduate studio in speech for actors. May be repeated for credit.

203 Graduate Studio: Movement (2). Work in graduate studio: stage movement taken in tandem with nine graduate studios in acting (Drama 200), voice (Drama 201), speech (Drama 202), and voice/movement dynamics (Drama 206). May be repeated for credit.

206 Graduate Studio: Voice/Movement Dynamics (2) F, W, S. Daily conditioning exercises. May be repeated for credit.

211 Graduate Studio: Directing (4) F, W, S. May be repeated for credit.

212 Graduate Studio: Playwriting (4). Completion of a full-length play or its equivalent and production of a staged reading of the play at the end of the spring quarter. Discussion of relevant literary texts and student writings. May be repeated for credit.

219 Graduate Master Class (1 to 4) F, W, S. Various topics such as Shakespeare, comedy, Molière, improvisation, Kabuki, television acting. May be repeated for credit.

220 Seminar in Dramatic Literature (4) F, W, S. May be repeated for credit.

221 Seminar in Criticism (4). May be repeated for credit.

224 Acting Theory (4). A study of the theory of acting, with readings in Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, Shakespeare, Diderot, Stanislavsky, Brecht, Strasberg, Meisner, Grotowski, and other theorists, ancient to contemporary. Prerequisite: Drama 130 or consent of instructor. Concurrent with Drama 181.

225 Seminar on Theatre Pedagogy (4) F, W, S. A seminar on the major teaching systems in the dramatic arts with particular attention to professional arts training. Graduate students in Drama only; required prior to applying for Teaching Assistantships in studio areas. May be repeated for credit.

230 Seminar in Contemporary Theatre (4)

235 Script Analysis and Research (4) F. Analysis of dramatic scripts. Examination of dramaturgic structure, character intentions and interactions, historical and literary milieu, and potentials for theatrical realization. May be repeated for credit.

240 Graduate Projects (1 to 4) F, W, S, Summer. Various projects depending on student's concentration (acting, design, musical theatre, directing). May be repeated for credit.

248A, B, C History of American Musical Theatre (4, 4, 4). A survey of the influential artists who produce, write, direct, and perform on America's musical stages. 248A: 1700s-1940s. 248B: 1940s-1970s. 248C: 1970s-present day. Concurrent with Drama 148A, B, C.

251A-B-C Foundations of Theatre (4-4-4) F, W, S. Seeks to create greater understanding in the roots and theories of theatrical models, aesthetics, action vs. reaction of differing thoughts in theatrical doctrine, and art, architecture, music, and fashion that contributed to the style and practice of theatre. Open to M.F.A. Drama students; others with consent of instructor.

254 Graduate Stage Management (4). F, W, S. Studio exercises and projects in stage management. Open only to graduate students in the Stage Management emphasis. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

255 Graduate Design Seminar (4) F, W, S. Projects, lectures, and critical discussion in costume, scenery, lighting, and sound design. Open only to graduate students in the Design emphasis. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

256 Survival and Professional Practice in Design (4) F, W, S. Provides an in-depth examination of business skills needed to survive as a theatrical designer. This is a required "Bridge" course in the Design M.F.A. programs and is relevant to all disciplines. Open to M.F.A. Drama students only.

257E Thesis Writing Project-Stage Management (4) F, W, S. Development of thesis topic with focus on organization, research, timeline, and execution. Prerequisite: 12 units of Drama 254. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

258 Drawing for Designers (2) F, W, S. A multi-skill level course in drawing technique focusing on skills essential to stage designers including line, proportion, perspective and creating dynamic compositions. Focus will primarily be in figure drawing but may include still-life, landscape, and architectural drawings. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. May be taken for credit nine times.

259 Theatre Colloquium (1) F, W, S. Exposes students to a wider range of theatrical practitioners, theories, and topics through guest lecturers, special projects, and cross-disciplinary dialogue. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to M.F.A. and Ph.D. Drama students; others with consent of instructor.

260A Digital Costume Rendering (4) F, W, S. A studio course in costume rendering for the theatre using computer image manipulation. Instruction in compositing and painting techniques and performance design conventions.

260B Digital Textile Design and Printing (4) F, W, S. A studio course in textile design using digital printing and embossing techniques. Instruction in state-of-the art software and output manipulation for artistic expression.

261 Digital Design: Drawing/Painting/Rendering (4) W. A studio course in scenic or costume rendering for the theatre using the computer for drawing/ painting through the use of the digital pen/tablet. May be taken for credit twice.

262 Digital Design: 2D/3D Modeling (4) W. A studio course in CAD's 2D and 3D modeling capabilities for theatrical design. Instruction in state-of-the-art software for 2D and 3D object creation and theatrical presentation conventions.

263 Digital Design: 3D Rendering (4) S. A studio course in theatrical design through 3D modeling on the computer and use of state-of-the-art rendering software. Instruction emphasizes collaborative design process through the use of scenic designer/lighting designer teams for all projects. Prerequisite: Drama 262.

264 Lighting Graphics (4) S. A studio course in the various graphic methods employed by lighting designers in the theatre. Projects include manual and CAD techniques for Light Plot and Paperwork creation. Prerequisite: Drama 262.

265 Digital Design: 2D CAD (4) S. A studio course in theatrical design and architectural lighting design on the computer. Instruction in state-of-the-art software for 2D object creation. Theatrical and architectural standards implemented in performance design. Prerequisite: Drama 262.

266 Digital Design: Digital Audio Systems (4) F. Comprehensive tutorial on digital audio including hard disk recording, editing, data compression, and ethernet audio distribution. Focus is on recording, editing, and delivery of audio as used by the sound designer in the digital domain. Prerequisite: Drama M.F.A. students only, or consent of instructor.

267 Digital Design: Creating Sounds from Scratch (4) S. The process of analyzing sounds for their core timbral components and using that data to create new sounds—from realistic to fantastic—by means of digital manipulation. Prerequisites: Drama 266; Drama M.F.A. Sound Design students only, or consent of instructor.

271 Conceptual Sound Design (4) W. An intensive, project-based seminar for exploring relationships between sound and sight. Synesthesia, creative intent vs. audience perception, and sound/movement are typical of the many topics to be explored. A series of creative projects are assigned and critiqued in peer review. Prerequisites: Drama 266; Drama M.F.A. Sound Design students only, or consent of instructor.

272 Musical Theatre Sound/Concert Sound (4) S. A concept-to-opening study of the process of designing sound systems for musicals and live/touring sound. Special attention given to the paperwork and documentation required to package, build, and mix these shows. Prerequisite: Drama M.F.A. Sound Design students only, or consent of instructor.

277 Critical Listening (4) F. Exploration of the many variables that affect (and effect) the audio chain. Perceiving and understanding these parameters unlocks the art of controlling sound and stylizing cues. Also includes the process of equalizing/aligning sound systems and the art of audio mastering. Prerequisites: Drama 266; Drama M.F.A. Sound Design students only, or consent of instructor.

279 Advanced Sound Design (4) F, W, S. An in-depth investigation into sound design for the theatre. Special emphasis is placed on text analysis, design conception, content creation, content delivery, and design organization. Class projects include creating paper designs and paperwork for different texts.

280A Techniques in Costume Design (4) F, W, S. Student exercises in the techniques and implementation of costume design. Open to M.F.A. students in Costume Design emphasis; others with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

280B Techniques in Scenery Design (4) F, W, S. Student exercises in the techniques and implementation of scenic design. Open to M.F.A. students in Scenic Design emphasis; others with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

280C Techniques in Lighting Design (4) F, W, S. Student exercises in the techniques and implementation of lighting design. Open to M.F.A. students in Lighting Design emphasis; others with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

280D Techniques in Sound Design (4) F, W, S. Student exercises in the techniques and implementation of sound design. Open to M.F.A. students in Sound Design emphasis; others with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

282 Stage Electronics/Introduction to Show Control (4) F, W, S. A course in using computers and dedicated hardware to cue, control, or automate sound, scenery, and lighting for live performance and themed entertainment applications. Open to Drama graduate students only.

290 Dramatic Literature and Theatre History Prior to 1900 (4) F, W, S. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

291 Dramatic Literature and Theatre History, 1900 to Present (4) F, W, S. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

292 Cultural and Critical Theory (4). F, W, S. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

293 Directed Studies (4 to 12). F, W, S. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

294 Dissertation Research (4 to 12) F, W, S. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. May be repeated for credit.

295 Professional Internship (1 to 12) F, W, S, Summer. An arranged internship at the South Coast Repertory Theatre, or other equity theatre company, for qualifying M.F.A. students. A stipend and equity points are provided by the theatre company. May be repeated for credit.

296 Seminar in Drama Pedagogy (4) F, W, S. Seminar in preparation for and required prior to receiving a Teaching Assistantship in Drama/Comparative Literature 40 (Development of Drama) course; particular attention on course preparation and pedagogical techniques. Prerequisites: first-year Drama doctoral students only and consent of instructor.

399 University Teaching (4) F, W, S. Limited to Teaching Assistants. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.