DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS SCIENCE

916F Engineering Tower; (949) 824-3887
http://www.eng.uci.edu/dept/chems
Albert Yee, Department Chair

Faculty / Undergraduate Program / Graduate Program / Courses

The Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science offers the B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering, the B.S. degree in Materials Science Engineering, the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Materials Science and Engineering.

Undergraduate Major in Chemical Engineering

Program Educational Objectives: Graduates of the program will (1) demonstrate a broad knowledge in the field of chemical engineering; (2) demonstrate critical reasoning and the requisite quantitative skills in seeking solutions to chemical engineering problems; (3) demonstrate skills for effective communication and teamwork; (4) effectively lead chemical engineering projects in industry, government, or academia; (5) exhibit a commitment to lifelong learning. (Program educational objectives are those aspects of engineering that help shape the curriculum; achievement of these objectives is a shared responsibility between the student and UCI.)

Chemical Engineering uses knowledge of chemistry, mathematics, physics, biology, and humanities to solve societal problems in areas such as energy, health, the environment, food, clothing, shelter, and materials and serves a variety of processing industries whose vast array of products include chemicals, petroleum products, plastics, pharmaceuticals, foods, textiles, fuels, consumer products, and electronic and cryogenic materials. Chemical engineers also serve society in improving the environment by reducing and eliminating pollution.

The undergraduate curriculum in Chemical Engineering builds on basic courses in chemical engineering, other branches of engineering, and electives which provide a strong background in humanities and human behavior. Elective programs developed by the student with a faculty advisor may include such areas as applied chemistry, biochemical engineering, chemical reaction engineering, chemical processing, environmental engineering, materials science, process control systems engineering, and biomedical engineering.

ADMISSIONS

High School Students: See page 197.

Transfer Students. Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), one year of general chemistry (with laboratory), and one additional approved course for the major.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division course work may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at (949) 824-4334.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: See page 198.

Major Requirements:

Mathematics and Basic Science Courses: Mathematics 2A-B, 2D, 3A, 3D, and 2E; Chemistry 1A-B-C, 1LC, 1LD; 51A-B-C, 51LB, 51LC or H52A-B-C, H52LA-LB, 130B-C or 131A-B; Physics 7C, 7LC; and Physics 7D and 7LD.

Engineering Topics Courses: Students must complete a minimum of 18 units of engineering design. Engineering MAE10 or EECS10, ENGR54, CBEMS45A-B-C, CBEMS110, CBEMS125A-B-C, CBEMS130, CBEMS135, CBEMS140A-B, and CBEMS149A-B. Students select, with the approval of a faculty advisor, any additional engineering topics courses needed to satisfy school and department requirements.

Technical Elective Courses: Students select, with the approval of a faculty advisor, a minimum of 22 units of technical electives. Students may select an area of specialization and complete the associated requirements, as shown below.

   (The nominal Chemical Engineering program will require 192 units of courses to satisfy all university and major requirements. Students typically need at least 17 units of engineering topics from technical electives to meet school requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary.)

Engineering Professional Topics Course: ENGR190W.

Specialization in Biomolecular Engineering: requires CBEMS112 or CBEMS134 and a minimum of 8 units from CBEMS124, CBEMS132, CBEMS199 or H199 (up to 4 units), BME50A, BME50B, BME121/CBEMS104, BME160, Biological Sciences 98, Biological Sciences 99, or Biological Sciences M128.

Specialization in Environmental Engineering: requires one course from CBEMS116, CBEMS199 or H199 (at least 3 units), CEE161. Also requires a minimum of two courses from CEE162, CEE163, CEE168, CEE171, CEE172, MAE110, MAE115, MAE164.

Specialization in Materials Science: requires a minimum of 12 units from ENGR150 (requires ENGR30, not included in total), CBEMS154, CBEMS155, CBEMS157, CBEMS158, CBEMS163, CBEMS174, CBEMS175, CBEMS191, CBEMS199 or H199 (up to 4 units), MAE155.

PLANNING A PROGRAM OF STUDY

The sample program of study chart shown is typical for the major in Chemical Engineering. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a sequence of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Students who are not adequately prepared, or who wish to make changes in the sequence for other reasons, must have their program approved by their faculty advisor. Chemical Engineering majors must consult at least once every year with the academic counselors in the Student Affairs Office and with their faculty advisors.

Sample Program of Study - Chemical Engineering

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

Chemistry 1A

Physics 7C, 7LC

Physics 7D, 7LD

EECS10 or MAE10

Chemistry 1B

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

General Education

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

Chemistry 51A, 1LD

Chemistry 51B, 51LB

Chemistry 51C, 51LC

CBEMS45A

CBEMS45B

CBEMS45C

General Education

ENGR54

General Education

Junior

CBEMS110

Chemistry 130B

Chemistry 130C

CBEMS125A

CBEMS125B

CBEMS125C

Technical Elective

CBEMS130

Technical Elective

General Education

General Education

General Education

Senior

CBEMS135

CBEMS140B

CBEMS149B

CBEMS140A

CBEMS149A

Technical Elective

ENGR190W

Technical Elective

General Education

Technical Elective

General Education

General Education

Undergraduate Major in Materials Science Engineering

During the first several years following graduation, the graduates of the Materials Science and Engineering undergraduate program are expected to reach these objectives: (1) utilize a solid background and broad knowledge in the application of the four primary elements of Materials Science and Engineering (structure, properties, processing, and performance) to engineered systems; (2) apply, whenever appropriate, design concepts and constraints that relate to materials (electronic, atomistic, molecular, microstructural, mesoscopic, macroscopic) as well as the design of engineering processes and systems (safety, economic, manufacturability environmental, ethical, and social); (3) show a sense of community, ethical responsibility, and professionalism in handling duties and performing tasks; (4) demonstrate independence and critical thinking in seeking optimum solutions for problems related to materials selections, and design; (5) communicate effectively with others (orally, in writing, and by listening); (6) work efficiently as a team player to solve open-ended problems that deal with materials selections and designs; (7) exhibit a commitment to continue the process of education and self-learning not only in the field of Materials Science and Engineering but also in other related fields.

Since the beginning of history, materials have played a crucial role in the growth, prosperity, security, and quality of human life. In fact, materials have been so intimately related to the emergence of human culture and civilization that anthropologists and historians have identified early cultures by the name of the significant materials dominating those cultures. These include the stone, bronze, and iron ages of the past. At the present time, the scope of materials science and engineering has become very diverse; it is no longer confined to topics related to metals and alloys but includes those relevant to ceramics, composites, polymers, biomaterials, nanostructures, intelligent materials, and electronic devices. In addition, present activities in materials science and engineering cover not only areas whose utility can be identified today, but also areas whose utility may be unforeseen. The services of materials scientists and engineers are required in a variety of engineering operations dealing, for example, with emerging energy systems, design of semiconductors and optoelectronic and nano devices, development of new technologies based on composites and high-temperature super-conductivity, biomedical products, performance (e.g., quality, reliability, safety, energy efficiency) in automobile and aircraft components, improvement in nondestructive testing techniques, corrosion behavior in refineries, radiation damage in nuclear power plants, and fabrication of advanced materials.

The undergraduate major in Material Science Engineering (MSE) provides students with a thorough knowledge of basic engineering and scientific principles. The undergraduate curriculum in MSE includes (a) a core of Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics; (b) basic Engineering courses; (c) Materials and Engineering core; and (d) technical courses in Materials Science, Engineering, and Sciences.

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of MSE and its intimate relations with other Engineering disciplines (Aerospace, Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering), qualified students will be able to satisfy in a straightforward manner the degree requirements of their Engineering major and the MSE major.

ADMISSIONS

High School Students: See page 197.

Transfer Students: Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), one year of general chemistry (with laboratory), and one additional approved course for the major.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division course work may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at (949) 824-4334.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN MATERIALS SCIENCE ENGINEERING

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: See page 198.

Major Requirements:

Mathematics and Basic Science Courses:

   Core Courses: Mathematics 2A-B, 2D, 3A, 3D, and 2E; Chemistry 1A-B-C and 1LE; Physics 7C, 7LC; Physics 7D-E and 7LD.

   Basic Engineering or Science Elective Courses: Students must complete one course from: Biology 93, Chemistry 51A, Physics 51A, Mathematics 7/Statistics 7, BME50A, CEE20, EECS70B, MAE52, MAE80 or CEE80.

Engineering Topics Courses: Students must complete a minimum of 22 units of engineering design.

   Core Courses: Engineering MAE10, MAE30/ENGR30 (or CEE30), CBEMS45B-C or MAE91, CBEMS50L, CBEMS125A or MAE130A, CBEMS125B or MAE120, CBEMS155, CBEMS155L, CBEMS160, CBEMS164, CBEMS165, CBEMS169, CBEMS175, CBEMS189A-B-C, CBEMS190, ENGR54, ENGR150, MAE150L, EECS70A.

   Engineering Electives: Students must complete a minimum of 19 units from BME50A, BME110A-B, BME111, BME120, CBEMS110, CBEMS130, CBEMS154, CBEMS157, CBEMS158, CBEMS163, CBEMS174, CBEMS191, CBEMS199, EECS70B, EECS170LA, EECS170B, EECS174, EECS176, EECS180, MAE106, MAE145, MAE147, MAE151, MAE152, MAE155, MAE157, MAE165, or MAE170. Students select, with the approval of a faculty advisor, any additional engineering topics courses needed to satisfy school and department requirements.

Engineering Professional Topics Course: ENGR190W.

   (The nominal Materials Science Engineering program will require 187 units of courses to satisfy all university and major requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary. Dual engineering majors are reminded that they are required to satisfy all requirements of both majors individually. Students should not assume that courses for one, such as senior design, will satisfy the requirements of the other, without prior approval.)

Students interested in Materials Science Engineering are advised to take CBEMS5. Students majoring in MSE may elect, with approval of their faculty advisor, to use available engineering electives to complete one of the following specializations.

Specialization in Biomaterials: Requires a minimum of 14 units from CBEMS154, CBEMS199 or H199, BME50A, BME110A-B, BME111, BME120.

Specialization in Electronics Processing and Materials: Requires a minimum of 14 units from CBEMS174, CBEMS199 or H199 (up to 3 units), EECS70B, EECS170LA, EECS174, and MAE165.

Specialization in Materials and Mechanical Design: Requires a minimum of 14 units from CBEMS199 or H199 (up to 3 units), MAE106, MAE145, MAE147, MAE151, MAE152, MAE155, MAE157, and MAE170.

MINOR IN MATERIALS SCIENCE ENGINEERING

The interdisciplinary field of materials science and engineering has become critical to many emerging areas of advanced technology and their applications. As a result, there are needs and opportunities for engineers and scientists with education and training in materials science and engineering. The goal of the minor in Materials Science Engineering (MSE) is to provide students at UCI with such education and training that will enable them, upon graduation, to not only participate in projects or programs of an interdisciplinary nature but also address challenging societal needs and complex technological advances.

Admission. Admission in the MSE minor requires a minimum 2.5 overall UCI GPA. Students are required to complete all prerequisites for required courses and selected electives. In particular, students need to complete the following courses before applying: Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1LE; Mathematics 2D, 3A, 2E, 3D; Physics 7C, 7LC; and Physics 7D, 7LD.

Requirements

The minor in Materials Science Engineering requires a total of seven courses—five required courses and two electives:

Required courses: ENGR54 and CBEMS155; and select three of the following four courses: CBEMS165*, CBEMS169, CBEMS175, and CBEMS199 (contingent upon the availability of research positions in the Materials Science Engineering faculty's research groups).

*   For students who plan to pursue a graduate degree in MSE, it is highly recommended that they take CBEMS165 in addition to two of the following courses: CBEMS169, CBEMS175, or CBEMS199.

Electives: Take two from the following courses: ENGR150, CBEMS154, CBEMS157, CBEMS158, CBEMS163, CBEMS174, CBEMS191, EECS170A-B, BME110A-B, BME111, BME120, MAE151, MAE155, MAE157, MAE165, Chemistry 130A, Chemistry 225, Mathematics 112A (or MAE140), Physics 112A, Physics 133, Physics 135.

PLANNING A PROGRAM OF STUDY

A sample program of study chart for the major in Materials Science Engineering is available in the Undergraduate Student Affairs Office. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a sequence of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Students who are not adequately prepared, or who wish to make changes in the sequence for other reasons, must have their program approved by their faculty advisor. Materials Science Engineering majors must consult at least once every year with the academic counselors in the Undergraduate Student Affairs Office and with their faculty advisors.

Sample Program of Study - Materials Science Engineering

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B

Physics 7D, 7LD

MAE10

Chemistry 1LE

Chemistry 1C

General Education

Physics 7C, 7LC

General Education

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

Physics 7E

ENGR54

CBEMS50L

ENGR30

CBEMS45B

CBEMS45C

General Education

Basic Engineering/
Science Elective

General Education

Junior

ENGR150, MAE150L

CBEMS155

CBEMS160

CBEMS164 includes lab

CBEMS155L

CBEMS169

CBEMS125A

CBEMS125B

CBEMS165

General Education

EECS70A

General Education

General Education

Senior

CBEMS189A

CBEMS189B

CBEMS189C

ENGR190W

CBEMS190

Engineering Elective

Engineering Elective

CBEMS175

Engineering Elective

Engineering Elective

Engineering Elective

General Education

General Education

Graduate Study in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Chemical engineering uses the knowledge of chemistry, mathematics, physics, biology, and social sciences to solve societal problems such as energy, health, environment, food, clothing, shelter, and transportation. It serves a variety of processing industries whose vast array of products include chemicals, petroleum products, plastics, pharmaceuticals, foods, semiconductors, textiles, fuels, consumer products, and electronic and cryogenic materials. It also serves society to improve the environment by reducing and eliminating pollution. Chemical engineering is an engineering discipline that has its strongest ties with the molecular sciences. This is an important asset since sciences such as chemistry, molecular biology, biomedicine, and solid-state physics are providing the seeds for future technologies. Chemical engineering has a bright future as the discipline which will bridge science with engineering in multidisciplinary environments.

Biochemical Engineering is concerned with the processing of biological materials and processes that use biological agents such as living cells, enzymes, or antibodies. Biochemical Engineering, with integrated knowledge of the principles of biology and chemical engineering, plays a major engineering role in the rapidly developing area of biotechnology. Career opportunities in Biochemical Engineering are available in a variety of industries such as biotechnology, chemical, environmental, food, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical industries.

The principal objectives of the graduate curriculum in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering are to develop and expand students' abilities to solve new and more challenging engineering problems and to promote their skills in independent thinking and learning in preparation for careers in manufacturing, research, or teaching. These objectives are reached through a program of course work and research designed by each student with the assistance, advice, and approval of a primary faculty advisor and a faculty advisory committee. Programs of study leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering are offered.

Recommended Background

It is strongly recommended that students have background and training in core Chemical Engineering topics (transport phenomena, thermodynamics, and reaction kinetics) as well as a strong background in mathematics, chemistry, and physics. A student who enters the program without undergraduate preparation in chemical engineering is required to take three to five additional prerequisite courses (Mathematics 3A and 3D, and Engineering CBEMS45B-C, CBEMS110, CBEMS112, and CBEMS125A).

Required Courses

Students are required to take the following courses for the M.S. degree and as a basis for the Ph.D. preliminary examination.

CBEMS210 (Reaction Engineering); CBEMS220 (Transport Phenomena); CBEMS230 (Applied Engineering Mathematics); CBEMS240 (Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics).

Electives

Graduate advisors should be consulted on the selection of elective courses. All graduate courses offered in CBEMS are potential electives. Graduate-level courses offered in other Engineering departments and relevant graduate courses from other schools may also be taken as electives.

Additional Information

Students are required to consult the graduate student handbook for more specific details regarding the course, exam, and unit requirements.

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

Two plans are available for the M.S. degree: a thesis option and a comprehensive examination option. Opportunities are available for part-time study toward the M.S. degree.

Plan I: Thesis Option

For the M.S. thesis option, students are required to complete a research study of great depth and originality and obtain approval for a complete program of study. A minimum of 36 units is required for the M.S. degree. The following are required: four required core courses, three quarters of CBEMS298 (Department Seminar), three additional Chemical Engineering-related graduate elective courses numbered 200-289 approved by the graduate advisor, and two additional non-Chemical Engineering-related graduate elective courses numbered 200-289 approved by the graduate advisor. Up to two of these elective courses can be substituted by up to eight units of CBEMS298 (M.S. Thesis Research), and one of the elective courses may be substituted by an upper-division undergraduate elective course approved by the CBE graduate advisor.

Full-time graduate students must enroll in the departmental seminar each quarter unless exempt by petition.

Plan II: Comprehensive Examination Option

For the comprehensive examination option, students are required to complete 36 units of study and a comprehensive examination. The following are required: four required core courses, three quarters of CBEMS298 (Department Seminar), three additional Chemical Engineering-related graduate elective courses numbered 200-289 approved by the graduate advisor, and two additional non-Chemical Engineering-related graduate elective courses numbered 200-289 approved by the graduate advisor. Up to two of the elective courses may be substituted by upper-division undergraduate elective courses if these courses are approved by the CBE graduate advisor.

Full-time graduate students must enroll in the departmental seminar each quarter unless exempt by petition.

NOTE: Students who entered prior to fall 2012 should follow the course requirements outlined within the Catalogue of the year they entered. The change in number of units per course is not intended to change the course requirements for the degree nor to have any impact in the number of courses students are taking. As such, students will need to continue to meet the same high standards and plan of study requirements as previously required. Students will work with their advisor to create a plan of study encompassing the equivalent topical requirements, as well as the equivalent number of courses to the previous 36-unit requirement.

In addition to fulfilling the course requirements outlined above, it is a University requirement for the Master of Science degree that students fulfill a minimum of 36 units of study.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE

The Ph.D. degree in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering requires a commitment on the part or the student to dedicated study and collaboration with the faculty. Ph.D. students are selected on the basis of outstanding demonstrated potential and scholarship. Applicants must hold the appropriate prerequisite degrees from recognized institutions of high standing. After substantial preparation, Ph.D. candidates work under the supervision of faculty advisors. The process involves extended immersion in a research atmosphere and culminates in the production of original research results presented in a dissertation.

Milestones to be passed in the Ph.D. program in order to remain in good standing include the following: acceptance into a research group by the faculty advisor at the end of the student's first year of study; successful completion of the Ph.D. preliminary examination by the end of the second year; preparation for pursuing research and the development of a research proposal culminating in passing the Qualifying Examination by the end of the third year of the Ph.D. program. The Qualifying Examination includes faculty evaluation of a written research dossier and an oral presentation. Students must advance to candidacy in their third year (second year for students who entered with a master's degree).

The core course requirements for the Ph.D. degree are the same as for the M.S. degree. Students must enroll in the departmental seminar each quarter unless exempt by petition. Ph.D. students must take two additional elective courses beyond the M.S. degree requirements. These courses are to be taken after the first year of graduate work, should be relevant to the Ph.D. dissertation topic, and must be selected in consultation with the research advisor and approved by the CBE graduate advisor. The preliminary examination is based on the four core courses and the ability of the student to comprehend and present a research paper. M.S. students who have completed a CBE M.S. degree elsewhere must have a written approval by the graduate advisor to waive required CBE core courses, if they have taken the equivalent courses elsewhere.

Final examination involves the oral presentation and defense of an acceptable dissertation in a seminar attended by students and faculty. The Ph.D. degree is granted upon the recommendation of the Doctoral Committee and the Dean of the Graduate Division. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years (four years for students who entered with a master's degree). The maximum time permitted is seven years.

Relationship of M.S. and Ph.D. Programs

Students applying with the objective of a Ph.D. are admitted to the M.S./Ph.D. program only if they are likely to successfully complete a Ph.D. program. These students do not formally reapply to the Ph.D. program after completing the M.S. degree. Students who apply to the M.S.-only program must formally apply for the Ph.D. program if they desire to continue on for the Ph.D. Financial support is usually reserved for those students who plan to complete the Ph.D. The normative time to complete M.S. and Ph.D. degrees is two and five years, respectively.

Graduate Study in Materials Science and Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering focuses on the development of new materials and new applications for materials in engineering. Current research programs include nanomaterials, nanostructures, nanoelectronics, nanodevices, nanocharacterization, device/system packaging materials, materials for fuel cells and related alternative energy systems, biocompatible materials, soft materials such as biological materials and polymeric materials, electronic and photonic materials, hybrid materials, interfacial engineering of materials, and multifunctional materials. Faculty with relevant research are affiliated with the Integrated Nanofabrication Research Facility (INRF), the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC), the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), the Advanced Power and Energy Program (APEP), and the Laboratory for Electron and X-ray Instrumentation (LEXI), among others.

The MSE graduate degree program is hosted by the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (ChEMS). Faculty who may serve as advisors are listed as affiliated with the ChEMS Department and include faculty with strong materials science and engineering research programs from other departments. The formal degree that is awarded upon successful completion of the program is either the M.S. or Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering.

Recommended Background

Given the nature of Materials Science and Engineering as a cross-disciplinary program, students having a background, and suitable training, in Materials, Engineering (Mechanical, Electrical, Civil, Chemical, Aerospace), and the Physical Sciences (Physics, Chemistry, Geology) are encouraged to participate. A student with an insufficient background may be required to take remedial undergraduate courses. Recommended background courses include an introduction to materials, thermodynamics, mechanical behavior, and electrical/optical/magnetic behavior.

Specific Fields of Emphasis

The Materials faculty at UCI have special interest and expertise in all areas of modern materials and technologies, including biomaterials, energy materials, advanced ceramics, polymers and nanocomposite materials, structural and nanostructured metallic materials, micro/nano-device materials, device/system packaging materials, and multifunctional materials.

Required Courses

Students are required to take one course from each area for the M.S. degree and as a basis for the Ph.D. preliminary examination.

Crystal Structure and Defects: MSE200 (Crystalline Solids: Structure, Imperfections, and Properties).

Electrical and Optical Behavior: MSE 205 (Materials Physics).

Mechanical Behavior: MSE256A (Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials).

Thermodynamics and Kinetics: one course from MSE252 (Theory of Diffusion), MSE265 (Phase Tranformations).

Electives

Faculty advisors should be consulted on the selection of elective courses. All graduate courses offered in CBEMS are potential electives. Graduate-level courses offered in other Engineering departments and relevant graduate courses from other schools may also be taken as electives.

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

The M.S. degree reflects achievement of an advanced level of competence for professional practice of materials science and engineering. Two options are available: a thesis option and a comprehensive examination option.

Plan I: Thesis Option

For the M.S. thesis option, students are required to complete a research study of great depth and originality and obtain approval for a complete program of study. A committee of three full-time faculty members is appointed to guide development of the thesis. A minimum of 36 units is required for the M.S. degree.

For the thesis option, the following are required: four required core courses; three quarters of CBEMS298 (Department Seminar), five additional graduate elective courses numbered 200-289 approved by the graduate advisor. Up to two of these elective courses can be substituted by up to eight units of CBEMS296 (M.S. Thesis Research), and one of these elective courses may be substituted by an upper-division undergraduate elective course approved by the MSE graduate advisor.

Full-time graduate students must enroll in the departmental seminar each quarter unless exempt by petition.

Plan II: Comprehensive Examination Option

For the comprehensive examination option, students are required to complete 36 units of study and a comprehensive examination.

The following are required: four required core courses; three quarters of CBEMS298 (Department Seminar), and a minimum of five additional graduate elective courses numbered 200-289 approved by the graduate advisor. Up to two of these elective courses may be substituted by upper-division undergraduate elective courses if these courses are approved by the MSE graduate advisor.

Full-time graduate students must enroll in the departmental seminar each quarter unless exempt by petition.

NOTE: Students who entered prior to fall of 2012 should follow the course requirements outlined within the Catalogue of the year they entered. The change in number of units per course is not intended to change the course requirements for the degree nor to have any impact in the number of courses students are taking. As such, students will need to continue to meet the same high standards and plan of study requirements as previously required. Students will work with their advisor to create a plan of study encompassing the equivalent topical requirements, as well as the equivalent number of courses to the previous 36-unit requirement.

In addition to fulfilling the course requirements outlined above, it is a University requirement for the Master of Science degree that students fulfill a minimum of 36 units of study.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE

The Ph.D. degree in Materials Science and Engineering requires a commitment on the part of the student to dedicated study and collaboration with the faculty. Ph.D. students are selected on the basis of outstanding demonstrated potential and scholarship. Applicants must hold the appropriate prerequisite degrees from recognized institutions of high standing. After substantial preparation, Ph.D. candidates work under the supervision of faculty advisors. The process involves extended immersion in a research atmosphere and culminates in the production of original research results presented in a dissertation. Milestones to be passed in the Ph.D. program in order to remain in good standing include the following: acceptance into a research group by the faculty advisor at the end of the student's first year of study; successful completion of the Ph.D. preliminary examination by the end of the second year; preparation for pursuing research and the development of a research proposal culminating in passing the Qualifying Examination by the end of the third year of the Ph.D. program. The Qualifying Examination includes faculty evaluation of a written research dossier and an oral presentation. Students must advance to candidacy in their third year (second year for students who entered with a master's degree).

The core course requirements for the Ph.D. are the same as for the M.S. Students must enroll in the departmental seminar each quarter unless exempt by petition. Ph.D. students must take two additional elective courses beyond the M.S. degree requirements. These courses are to be taken after the first year of graduate work, should be relevant to the Ph.D. dissertation topic, and must be selected in consultation with the research advisor and approved by the MSE graduate advisor. The preliminary examination is based on the four core courses for the M.S. Students who have completed an MSE M.S. degree elsewhere must have a written approval by the graduate advisor to waive required MSE core courses, if they have taken the equivalent courses elsewhere.

Final examination involves the oral presentation and defense of an acceptable dissertation in a seminar attended by students and faculty. The Ph.D. degree is granted upon the recommendation of the Doctoral Committee and the Dean of the Graduate Division. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years (four years for students who entered with a master's degree). The maximum time permitted is seven years.

Relationship of M.S. and Ph.D. programs. Students applying with the objective of a Ph.D. are admitted to the M.S./Ph.D. program only if they are likely to successfully complete a Ph.D. program. These students do not formally reapply to the Ph.D. program after completing the M.S. degree. Students who apply to the M.S.-only program must formally apply for the Ph.D. program if they desire to continue on for a Ph.D. Financial support is usually reserved for those students who plan to complete the Ph.D. The normative time to complete M.S. and Ph.D. degrees is two and five years, respectively.

Courses in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

(Schedule of Classes designation: CBEMS)

UNDERGRADUATE

NOTE: The undergraduate courses listed below may be restricted to specific majors with each offering. Consult the Schedule of Classes for more information on course restrictions.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

CBEMS45A Chemical Processing and Materials Balances (4) F. Introduction to chemical engineering and the industries where chemical engineers play vital roles. Problem-solving skills and techniques. Quantitative calculations and applications using mass and energy balances. Stoichiometric equations, multiple bypasses, and others in process industries. Prerequisites: Mathematics 2B; Chemistry 1B; Physics 7C. (Design units: 0) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS45B Chemical Processing and Energy Balances (3) W. Principles of thermodynamics: definitions, basic concepts, and laws; property relationships; construction of thermodynamic charts and tables; energy balances; phase and chemical equilibria; combined mass and energy balances. Prerequisites: CBEMS45A or Physics 7E; Mathematics 3A. CBEMS45B and MAE91 may not both be taken for credit. (Design units: 0) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS45C Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (4) S. Elements of chemical engineering thermodynamics, including equilibrium and stability; equations of state; generalized correlations of properties of materials; properties of ideal and non-ideal mixtures; thermodynamics of real solutions; ideal and non-ideal phase equilibria; chemical equilibria for ideal and non-ideal solutions. Prerequisite: EECS10 or MAE10; Mathematics 2D; CBEMS45B with a grade of C- or better. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS50L Principles of Materials Science and Engineering (2) S. Introduction to the experimental techniques to characterize the properties of engineering materials. Emphasis on understanding the influence of microstructure on elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior. Topics include microstructure characterization, heat treatment, grain size effect, precipitation hardening, and impact loading. Corequisite: ENGR54. (Design units: 0) Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS104 Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (4). A quantitative and systems approach to understanding physiological systems. Systems covered include the cardiopulmonary, circulatory, and renal systems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 3D or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Same as BME121. Concurrent with CBEMS204 and BME221. (Design units: 1)

CBEMS108 Biopharmaceutics and Nanomedicine (4). Introduces theories and tools of new drug formulations. Particularly new novel therapeutics based on biological materials, pathological characteristics utilized to achieve the maximum efficacy and speciality, and drug delivery systems based on emerging nanotechnology are extensively discussed. Prerequisite: Pharmaceutical Sciences 170B or consent of instructor. Same as Pharmaceutical Sciences 174. (Design units: 0)

CBEMS110 Reaction Kinetics and Reactor Design (4) F. Introduction to quantitative analysis of chemical reactions and chemical reactor design. Reactor operations including batch, continuous stirred tank, and tubular reactor. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Prerequisites: Mathematics 3D; Chemistry 1C; CBEMS40B or CBEMS45B-C. (Design units: 2) Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS112 Introduction to Biochemical Engineering (3). Application of engineering principles to biochemical processes. Topics include: microbial pathways, energetics and control systems, enzyme and microbial kinetics, and the design and analysis of biological reactors. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1C, Mathematics 3D; and CBEMS110 or consent of instructor. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS116 Field Practicum in Environmental Engineering (4). Application of concepts from engineering and microbiology to the characterization and analysis of microbial pollution in coastal waters. Topics include public health microbiology, microbial diversity and ecology, molecular diagnostics of waterborne pathogens. Laboratory exercises and a field-scale experiment. Corequisite: CBEMS110 or CEE162. (Design units: 2) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS124 Transport Phenomena in Living Systems (3). An introduction to transport phenomena in cellular and whole organ systems. Application of transport theory including advection and diffusion to the movement of molecules in biological systems, including the cardiovascular system (heart and microcirculation), and the lung. Prerequisite: CBEMS120A or CBEMS125A or consent of instructor. (Design units: 0) Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS125A Momentum Transfer (4) F. Fluid statics, surface tension, Newton's Law of viscosity, non-Newtonian and complex flows, momentum equations, momentum transport, laminar and turbulent flow, velocity profiles, flow in pipes, flow around objects, design of piping systems, pumps and mixing and other applications to chemical and related industries. Prerequisites: CBEMS45A-B-C; Mathematics 3D. Only one course from CBEMS125A, MAE130A, and CEE170 may be taken for credit. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS125B Heat Transfer (3) W. Principles of conduction, radiation, and convection of heat; phenomenological rate laws, differential and macroscopic energy balances; heat transfer rates, steady state and unsteady state conduction, convection; applications to chemical and related industries. Prerequisite: CBEMS125A with a grade of C- or better. Only one course from CBEMS125B, CBEMS120B, and MAE120 may be taken for credit. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS125C Mass Transfer (3) S. Molecular and continuum approaches to diffusion and convection in fluids and multi-component mixtures; mass transfer rates; steady state, quasi-steady state and transient mass transfer; effect of reactions on mass transfer; convective mass transfer coefficients; simultaneous mass, heat and momentum transfer; applications to chemical and related industries. Prerequisite: CBEMS125B. CBEMS125C and BME150 may not both be taken for credit. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS126 Biomedical Photonics (3). Biophysical principles governing the interaction of laser radiation with biological materials, cells, and tissues. Utilization of these principles in several biomedical therapeutic and diagnostic applications is also covered and discussed in detail. Prerequisites: CBEMS120A-B or CBEMS125A-B-C; or consent of instructor. (Design units: 0)

CBEMS128 Introduction to Numerical Methods in Engineering (3). An introduction to the fundamentals of numerical analysis and the computer algorithms in MATLAB for the solution of engineering problems, with emphasis on problems arising in chemical engineering thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and reaction engineering. Prerequisites: CBEMS45C and CBEMS125A. (Design units: 0)

CBEMS130 Separation Processes (4) W. Application of equilibria and mass and energy balances for design of separation processes. Use of equilibrium laws for design of distillation, absorption, stripping, and extraction equipment. Design of multicomponent separators. Prerequisite: CBEMS40B or CBEMS45B-C. (Design units: 3) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS132 Bioseparation Processes (3). Recovery and purification of biologically produced proteins and chemicals. Basic principles and engineering design of various separation processes including chromatography, electrophoresis, extraction, crystallization, and membrane separation. Prerequisites: CBEMS40A-B or CBEMS45A-B-C; CBEMS120A or CBEMS125A. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS134 Introduction to Bioreactor Engineering (3). Unique features of bioreactors. Analyses and design of bioreactors of batch, fed-batch, and continuous flow types. Microbial reactors with and without cell recycles. Bioreactor operations for industrial-important biological products and for biological treatment of wastewater. Prerequisites: CBEMS110. (Design units: 1.5) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS135 Chemical Process Control (4) F. Dynamic responses and control of chemical process equipment, dynamic modeling of chemical processes, linear systems analysis, analyses and design of feedback loops and advanced control systems. Prerequisites: CBEMS110; CBEMS120B or CBEMS125B-C. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS140A Chemical Engineering Laboratory I (4) F. Experimental study of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat and mass transfer. Operation and evaluation of process equipment, data analysis. Prerequisites: CBEMS110; CBEMS120B or CBEMS125C; each with a grade of C- or better. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS140B Chemical Engineering Laboratory II (4) W. Continuation of CBEMS140A covering mass transfer operations such as distillation, absorption, extraction. Rate and equilibria studies in simple chemical systems with and without reaction. Study of chemical process. Prerequisites: CBEMS130 with a grade of C- or better; CBEMS135; CBEMS140A. (Design units: 3) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS145 Chemical Engineering Design (5) S. Application of chemical engineering science techniques to design of chemical processes. Introduction to systematic design of separations and the integration of energy requirement. Integration of process economics and optimization. Consideration of retrofit design, design of nontraditional chemical processes, process safety. Prerequisites: CBEMS110, CBEMS120B or CBEMS125C, CBEMS130. CBEMS145 and CBEMS149A may not both be taken for credit. (Design units: 5) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS149A Chemical Engineering Design I (3) W. Introduction to process design; flow sheets for chemical processes; synthesis of multicomponent separation sequences and reaction paths; synthesis of heat exchange networks; computer-aided design and simulation of processes and components pacts. Prerequisites: CBEMS110, CBEMS125C, CBEMS130. CBEMS149A and CBEMS145 may not both be taken for credit. (Design units: 2) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS149B Chemical Engineering Design II (3) S. Application of chemical engineering basics to practical design problems; process economics; process safety; environmental impacts; a major team-design project with progress reports, oral presentation, and a technical report with engineering drawings and economics. Prerequisite: CBEMS149A. (Design units: 3) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS154 Polymer Science and Engineering (4). An introduction to physical aspects of polymers, including configuration and conformation of polymer chains and characterization techniques; crystallinity visoelasticity, rheology and processing. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1A-B-C and ENGR54, or consent of instructor. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS155 Mechanical Behavior and Design Principles (4) W. Principles governing structure and mechanical behavior of materials, relationship relating microstructure and mechanical response with application to elasticity, plasticity, yielding, necking, creep, and fracture of materials. Introduction to experimental techniques to characterize the properties of materials. Design parameters. Prerequisite: ENGR54. Same as MAE156. (Design units: 2) Chemical Engineering, Materials Science Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS155L Mechanical Behavior Laboratory (1) W. Introduction to experimental techniques to characterize mechanical properties of materials. Emphasis on the correlations between property and microstructure. Experiments include: plastic stability in tension, effect of grain size and flow stress at low and high temperatures, strain rate effects, impact test, superplasticity, creep of materials. Corequisite: CBEMS155. Prerequisite: ENGR54. Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS157 Composite Materials Design (3). Introduction to fiber-reinforced composites for mechanical applications. Properties of reinforcing fibers. Manufacture of fibers and composites. Micromechanics of fiber composites. Strength criteria and failure modes. Macromechanics in design of laminated composite structures. Prerequisites: ENGR54 and ENGR150. (Design units: 3) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS158 Ceramic Materials (3). A technical elective for students interested in the materials area. Topics covered include structure and properties of ceramics and design with ceramics. Prerequisite: ENGR54. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS160 Advanced Laboratory in Chemistry and Synthesis of Materials (4) S. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Synthesis and characterization of organic and inorganic materials including polymers and oxides. Techniques include electron and scanning probe microscopy, gel permeation chromatography, x-ray diffraction, porosimetry, and thermal analysis. Prerequisites: ENGR54 or Chemistry 130A-B or 131A-B or Pharmaceutical Sciences 171. Same as Chemistry 156. (Design units: 0). Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS163 Computer Techniques in Experimental Materials Research (3). Principles and practical guidelines of automated materials testing. Computer fundamentals, programming languages, data acquisition and control hardware, interfacint techniques, programming strategies, data analysis, data storage, safeguard procedures. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS164 X-Ray Diffraction, Electron Microscopy, and Microanalysis (4) F. Material characterization using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Topics include x-ray diffraction and analysis; SEM imaging and microanalysis. Prerequisites: CBEMS50L and ENGR54. (Design units: 1) Materials Science Engineering and Mechanical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS165 Diffusion and Phase Transformations (3) S. Thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations, phase diagrams, diffusional and diffusionless transformations. Prerequisites: ENGR54; CBEMS40B or CBEMS45C or MAE91 with a grade of C- or better. (Design units: 0) Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS166 Science of Nanoscale Materials and Devices (3). Covers the properties of nanoscale materials and aspects of current research on next-generation electronic devices. Topics include nanofabrication, characterization of nanostructure materials, and device concepts that take the advantage of quantum mechanical phenomena on the nanoscale. Prerequisites: ENGR54 and Physics 7D. (Design units: 0) Chemical Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS169 Electronic and Optical Properties in Materials (4) S. Covers the electronic, optical, and dielectric properties of crystalline and amorphous materials to provide a foundation of the underlying physical principles governing the properties of existing and emerging electronic and photonic materials. Prerequisites: Physics 7D and 7E, Mathematics 3A and 3D. (Design units: 1) Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS174 Semiconductor Device Packaging (3). Introduction to the semiconductor device packaging and assembly processes. Electrical, thermal, optical, and mechanical aspects of package design and reliability. Special topics on optoelectronics packaging are covered. Prerequisite: CBEMS40A or CBEMS45B or consent of instructor. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS175 Design Failure Investigation (4) W. Survey of the mechanisms by which mechanical devices may fail, including overload, fatigue, corrosion, and wear. Use of fractography and other evidence to interpret failure modes and specify design/manufacturing changes. Students redesign failed parts or structures based on actual parts and/or case histories. Prerequisite: ENGR54. (Design units: 2) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS189A-B-C Senior Design Project (1-2-2) F, W, S. Group supervised senior design projects that deal with materials selection in engineering design and that involve case studies in ethics, safety, design, failure modes, new products, and patents. Activities conclude with a presentation of the projects. In-Progress grading. CBEMS189A-B-C must be taken in the same academic year. (Design units: 1-2-2) CBEMS189A-B-C: Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS190 Materials Selection and Design (4) W. Meaning and phases of design. Design considerations. Safety issues and engineering ethics. Codes and standards. Materials selection in design. Materials selection to meet specific requirements. Statistical considerations. Engineering economics. Seminars on materials selection and design by industry leaders and faculty. Prerequisite: senior standing. Formerly CBEMS 190A. (Design units: 3) Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS191 Materials Outreach (3). Demonstration of major concepts in Materials Science and Engineering. Concepts of materials engineering covered include: deformation mechanisms in crystalline solids, effects of heat treatment on mechanical properties, thermal barrier materials, composites design, mechanical behavior of polymers, superconductivity in ceramics. Prerequisite: ENGR54. May be taken for credit four times. (Design units: 1) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS195 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering and Material Science (1 to 4). Prerequisites vary. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

CBEMS198 Group Study (1 to 4). Group study of selected topics in engineering. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (Design units: varies)

CBEMS199 Individual Study (1 to 4). For undergraduate Engineering majors in supervised but independent readings, research, or design. Students taking individual study for design credit are to submit a written paper to the instructor and to the Undergraduate Student Affairs Office in the School of Engineering. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be taken for a total of eight units. (Design units: varies) Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Engineering majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CBEMS199P Individual Study (1 to 4). Supervised independent reading, research, or design for undergraduate Engineering majors. Students taking individual study for design credit are to submit a written paper to the instructor and to the Undergraduate Student Affairs Office in the School of Engineering. Pass/Not Pass only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (Design units: varies)

GRADUATE

CHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING

CBEMS204 Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (4). A quantitative and systems approach to understanding physiological systems. Systems covered include the cardiopulmonary, circulatory, and renal systems. Same as BME221. Concurrent with CBEMS104 and BME121.

CBEMS210 Reaction Engineering (4) W. Advanced topics in reaction engineering, reactor stability analysis, diffusional effect in heterogeneous catalysis, energy balance, optimization of reactor operation, dispersed in phase reactors. Prerequisite: CBEMS110 or consent of instructor.

CBEMS218 Bioengineering with Recombinant Microorganisms (4). Engineering and biological principles important in recombinant cell technology. Host/vector selection, plasmid propagation, optimization of cloned gene expression, metabolic engineering, protein secretion, experimental techniques, modeling of recombinant cell systems. Prerequisites: CBEMS110, CBEMS112; or consent of instructor.

CBEMS220 Transport Phenomena (4) W. Heat, mass, and momentum transfer theory from the viewpoint of the basic transport equations. Steady and unsteady state; laminar and turbulent flow; boundary layer theory, mechanics of turbulent transport with specific application to complex chemical engineering situations. Prerequisites: CBEMS120A-B or CBEMS125A-B-C; or consent of instructor.

CBEMS221 Drug Delivery (4). Introduction to design of drug delivery systems. Includes physicochemical and pharmacokinetic considerations in drug formulations, types of therapeutics, routes of administration, biomaterials, and novel drug delivery systems. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1C; CBEMS112, BME50B or Biological Sciences 93; or consent of instructor.

CBEMS226 Biomedical Photonics (4). Biophysical principles governing the interaction of laser radiation with biological materials, cells, and tissues. Utilization of these principles in several biomedical therapeutic and diagnostic applications is also covered and discussed in detail. Prerequisites: CBEMS120A-B or CBEMS125A-B-C; or consent of instructor. Concurrent with CBEMS126.

CBEMS230 Applied Engineering Mathematics I (4) F. Analytical techniques applied to engineering problems in transport phenomena, process dynamics and control, and thermodynamics. Prerequisites: CBEMS110; CBEMS120A-B or CBEMS125A-B-C; or consent of instructor.

CBEMS232 Bioseparation Processes (4). Recovery and purification of biologically produced proteins and chemicals. Basic principles and engineering design of various separation processes including chromatography, electrophoresis, extraction, crystallization, and membrane separation. Prerequisite: CBEMS112 or consent of instructor.

CBEMS240 Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics (4) F. Introduction to modern thermodynamics and applications, with a focus on aspects relevant to chemical and materials engineering. Mathematical tools; equilibrium and stability; microscopic rigorous equations of state; molecular-level thermodynamics of real mixtures; and phase and chemical equilibrium. Prerequisite: CBEMS40B or CBEMS45B-C; or consent of instructor.

CBEMS242A Physical and Geometrical Optics (4) W. Focuses on the practical aspects of optics and optical engineering, starting at the fundamentals. Topics include geometrical optics, ray tracing, polarization optics, interferometers, and diffractive optics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Same as Chemistry 242A. Concurrent with Physics 134A.

CBEMS242B Applied Optics (4) S. Focuses on the treatment of a wide variety of tools and techniques used in optics, in particular in research. Subjects include an introduction to lasers, optical detection, coherent optics, spectroscopic techniques, and selected topics corresponding to the interest of the students. Prerequisite: CBEMS242A or consent of instructor. Same as Chemistry 242B.

CBEMS249 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (1 to 4). Prerequisites vary. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

CBEMS295 Seminars in Engineering (1 to 4). Seminars scheduled each year by individual faculty in major field of interest. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

CBEMS296 Master of Science Thesis (1 to 16). Individual research or investigation conducted in preparation for the thesis required for the M.S. degree. May be repeated for credit.

CBEMS297 Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation Research (1 to 16). Individual research or investigation conducted in preparation for the dissertation required for the Ph.D. degree. May be repeated for credit.

CBEMS298 Seminars in Engineering (2) F, W, S. Presentation of advanced topics and reports of current research efforts in chemical engineering and materials science. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated for credit.

CBEMS299 Individual Research (1 to 16). Individual research or investigation under the direction of an individual faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

MATERIALS SCIENCE

(Schedule of Classes designation: EngrMSE)

MSE200 Crystalline Solids: Structure, Imperfections, and Properties (4) F. Principles and concepts underlying the study of advanced materials including alloys, composites, ceramics, semiconductors, polymers, ferroelectrics, and magnetics. Crystal structure and defects, surface and interface properties, thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations, and material processing, related to fundamental material properties. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1A-B-C, Physics 7A, 7LA.

MSE205 Materials Physics (4) W. Covers the electronic, optical, and dielectric properties of crystalline materials to provide a foundation of the underlying physical principles governing the properties of existing and emerging electronic and photonic materials.

MSE251 Dislocation Theory (4). Theory of elasticity and symmetry of crystals, plasticity and slip systems, stress field of dislocation, dislocation reaction, theories of yielding and strengthening, application of reaction-rate kinetics to thermally activated dislocation motion. Prerequisite: ENGR54 or consent of instructor.

MSE252 Theory of Diffusion (4). Solid-state diffusion, analysis of diffusion in solids, thermodynamics of diffusion, application of diffusion theory to phase transformation and deformation problems. Prerequisite: ENGR54 or consent of instructor.

MSE254 Polymer Science and Engineering (4). An introduction to organic and physical chemistry polymers, including synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms; configuration and conformation of polymer chains and characterization techniques; visoelasticity and rheology. Special topics in biopolymers and polymer surfaces. Prerequisite: CBEMS154.

MSE255A Design with Ceramic Materials (4). Dependence of ceramic properties on bonding, crystal structure, defects, and microstructure. Ceramic manufacturing technology. Survey of physical properties. Strength, deformation, and fracture of ceramics. Mechanical design with brittle, environment-sensitive materials exhibiting time-dependent strengths. Prerequisite: ENGR54 or consent of instructor.

MSE256A Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials (4) W. Principles governing structure and mechanical behavior of materials, relationship relating microstructure and mechanical response with application to elasticity, plasticity, creep, and fatigue, study of rate-controlling mechanisms and failure modes, fracture of materials. Prerequisite: ENGR54.

MSE256B Fracture of Engineering Materials (4). Fracture mechanics and its application to engineering materials. Elastic properties of cracks, the stress intensity factor, the crack tip plastic zone, the J Integral approach, fracture toughness testing, the crack tip opening displacement, fracture at high temperatures, fatigue crack growth. Prerequisite: CBEMS155 or MAE156; or consent of instructor.

MSE261 High-Temperature Deformation of Engineering Materials (4). Theoretical and practical aspects of creep and superplasticity in metallic and non-metallic systems are presented. Topics include: creep testing methods, diffusional creep, deformation mechanism maps, and superplasticity in non-metallics. Prerequisites: ENGR54; CBEMS155 or MAE156; or consent of instructor.

MSE262 Grain Boundaries and Interfaces in Nanocrystalline Materials (4). Structure and character of grain boundaries and interfaces in solids including nanocrystalline materials. The role of grain boundaries in chemical segregation, fracture, deformation and creep, electrical properties, diffusion and grain growth. Experimental techniques and computational methods used to characterize and model grain boundaries.Prerequisite: MSE200 or consent of instructor.

MSE264 Scanning Electron Microscopy (4). The theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered include the basic design and electron optics, electron beam-specimen interactions, image formation and interpretation, x-ray spectrometry, and other related topics and techniques. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: MSE200 or consent of instructor.

MSE265 Phase Transformations (4) F. Advanced thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations and phase transitions. Prerequisite: CBEMS165 or CBEMS 240 or equivalent.

MSE267 Environmentally Sustainable Manufacturing (4). Multidisciplinary case study approach to environmentally sustainable manufacturing with a focus on electronic products. Engineering, economic, public policy, and industrial ecology aspects. Design, manufacture, policy, and environmental impact reviewed as a function of the entire life-cycle of the materials from extraction through disposal or recycling. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

MSE268 Principles of Coatings, Thin Films, and Multi-layers (4). Principles and concepts underlying the engineering of coating systems, thin films, and multi-layers. Microstructure control, processing approaches, mechanical behavior and thermomechanical characteristics and characterization. Interfacial stability, cracking, delamination, and thermal stress issues. Control of functional properties. Prerequisite: ENGR54.

MSE273 Electroceramics and Solid-State Electrochemical Systems (4). Theory, underlying principles, experimental techniques and applications of electroceramics, and solid-state electrochemical systems. Links solid-state physics, atomic structure, thermodynamics, defect chemistry and transport processes to electrical properties of ceramics—spanning from insulators to fast ion conductors and HT superconductors. Prerequisite: MSE200 or equivalent.