DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

E4130 Engineering Gateway; (949) 824-5333
http://www.eng.uci.edu/dept/cee
Brett Sanders, Department Chair

Faculty / Undergraduate Program / Graduate Program / Courses

Civil Engineering is described as the art of sustainably harnessing the natural environment to meet human needs. The success of this endeavor is evident all around us. The arid plain which greeted the early settlers in Southern California has been transformed into a thriving regional community largely by the application of civil engineering.

The goal of the Civil Engineering curriculum is to prepare graduates for a career in practice, research, or teaching. At the undergraduate level a common core of fundamental subjects is provided, and students are required to specialize in their senior year. Specializations are offered in General Civil Engineering, Environmental Hydrology and Water Resource Engineering, Structural Engineering, and Transportation Systems Engineering. Concentrations are offered in Computer Applications, Engineering Management, Infrastructure Planning, and Mathematical Methods. Graduate opportunities are in three major thrust areas: structural analysis, design, and reliability; transportation systems engineering; and water resources and environmental engineering.

The career opportunities in civil engineering are varied. Graduates may look forward to long-term careers in major corporations, public bodies, the military, private consulting firms, or to being self-employed in private practice. History has shown a civil engineering education to be a good ground for many administrative and managerial positions.

Environmental Engineering involves designing environmental protection or remediation strategies for multiple resources—water, air, and soil, often with combinations of physical, chemical, and biological treatment methods in the context of a complex regulatory framework.

The goal of the Environmental Engineering curriculum is to prepare graduates with a strong basic science background, particularly in chemistry and biology, and to provide students with a broad exposure to several environmental engineering science disciplines. Courses relating to transport processes, water quality control, air quality control, and process design are included in the core.

Career opportunities in environmental engineering are diverse. Graduates generally find careers related to pollution control and the remediation of air, water, and soil environments.

Undergraduate Major in Civil Engineering

Program Educational Objectives: Graduates of the program will (1) establish a Civil Engineering career in industry, government, or academia and achieve professional licensure as appropriate; (2) demonstrate excellence and innovation in engineering problem solving and design in a global and societal context; (3) commit to lifelong learning and professional development to stay current in technology and contemporary issues; and (4) take on increasing levels of responsibility and leadership in technical and/or managerial roles. (Program educational objectives are those aspects of engineering that help shape the curriculum; achievement of these objectives is a shared responsibility between the student and UCI.)

The curriculum provides the opportunity to obtain a firm foundation in engineering science and to develop the techniques of analysis and design, which are basic for the successful practitioner. Emphasis is placed on developing problem-solving skills.

ADMISSIONS

High School Students: See page 197.

Transfer Students. Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), one year of chemistry (with laboratory), and one additional approved course for the major.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division course work may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at (949) 824-4334.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: See page 198.

Major Requirements:

Mathematics and Basic Science Courses: Mathematics 2A-B, 2D, 3A, 3D, 2E; Chemistry 1A-B, Chemistry 1C and 1LC, or Chemistry 1LE and a science elective*; Physics 7C, 7LC; Physics 7D, 7LD.

*Science Electives: Chemistry 1C, Physics 7E, Earth Systems Science 1, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 15, 60A, Biological Sciences 55, 65, or 93.

Engineering Science Elective: Students must complete one course from the following: EECS70A, ENGR54, MAE80, or MAE91.

   Additional mathematics and basic science course work may be required depending on the student's applied program.

Engineering Topics Courses: Students must complete a minimum of 22 units of engineering design. Engineering EECS10 or EECS12; CEE11; CEE20; CEE30; CEE81A; CEE81B; CEE110; CEE111; CEE121; CEE130; CEE130L; CEE150; CEE150L; CEE151A; CEE151C; CEE160; CEE170 or MAE130A; CEE171; CEE181A-B-C.

Engineering Design Elective: Students must complete one course from the following: CEE122, CEE123, CEE155 or CEE172. Students completing the specialization in Structural Engineering must take CEE155. Engineering Design Elective cannot be counted toward the course requirement for a specialization and/or concentration.

Engineering Professional Topics Courses: Economics 20A-B; CEE60 or Social Ecology E8; ENGR190W.

Technical Electives: Students must select one of the areas of specialization or concentration and complete the associated requirements, as shown below. Students select, with the approval of a faculty advisor, any additional engineering topics courses needed to satisfy school and departmental requirements.

  (The nominal Civil Engineering program will require 187 units of courses depending on specialization or concentration to satisfy all university and major requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary.)

Specialization in General Civil Engineering: Requires one course each from four of the following five options: (1) CEE122 or CEE123; (2) CEE152, CEE153, CEE155, or CEE156; (3) CEE162 or CEE168; (4) CEE172, CEE176, or CEE178; or (5) CEE55 or courses from an approved list.

Specialization in Environmental Hydrology and Water Resources: Requires four courses from CEE162, CEE163, CEE172, CEE173, CEE176, CEE178, or courses from an approved list.

Specialization in Structural Engineering: Requires CEE155 for the Engineering Design Elective, CEE153 and three courses from CEE149, CEE151B, CEE152, CEE156, MAE155, and MAE157, or courses from an approved list.

Specialization in Transportation Systems Engineering: Requires CEE122 and CEE123, and two courses from CEE124, CEE125, EECS70A, MAE140, MAE170, MAE171, or courses from an approved list.

The Department does not control the scheduling of most courses associated with the following concentrations. Students considering these options should be aware that some of these courses may not be available on a regular basis.

Concentration in Computer Applications: Requires at least five courses or 20 units selected from ICS 6D, ICS 21, ICS 22, ICS 23, ICS 52, EECS40, and selected ICS, EECS, and other courses from an approved list.

Concentration in Engineering Management: Requires Management 5 and five other courses selected from ENGR190, Management 101, 102, 107, 160, 185, and other courses from an approved list. Prospective students must first be admitted to The Paul Merage School of Business undergraduate minor in Management.

Concentration in Infrastructure Planning: Requires at least six courses selected from CEE123, Planning, Policy, and Design 107, 108, 109, 110, 133, 139, and other courses from an approved list.

Concentration in Mathematical Methods: Requires Mathematics 13 and 140A, and four other courses selected from ICS 6D, Statistics 7, MAE 140, MAE185 or Mathematics 105A and 105LA, Mathematics 105B and 105LB, 107, 112A-B-C, 118A-B-C, 130B-C, 131A-B-C, and other courses from an approved list.

In addition, students must aggregate a minimum of 24 design units. Design unit values are indicated at the end of each course description. The faculty advisors and the Student Affairs Office can provide necessary guidance for satisfying the design requirements.

At most an aggregate total of 6 units of 199 or H199 courses may be used to satisfy degree requirements.

PROGRAM OF STUDY

Sample Program of Study - Civil Engineering

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

EECS10 or EECS12

Physics 7C, 7LC

Physics 7D, 7LD

Chemistry 1A

Chemistry 1B

General Education

General Education

Chemistry 1LE and
Science Elective (or Chemistry 1C, 1LC in spring)

Chemistry 1C, 1LC (or Chemistry 1LE, and Science Elective in winter)

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

CEE30

Engr. Science Elective

CEE11

CEE81A, 81B

General Education

CEE20

General Education

General Education

Junior

CEE121

CEE130, 130L

CEE110

CEE150, 150L

CEE151A

CEE151C

CEE170 or MAE130A

CEE171

CEE160

ENGR190W

General Education

General Education

The following sample plans of study are provided for the senior year only; the first three years are common to all specializations.

Senior-Year Sample Programs of Study - Civil Engineering

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Senior: General Civil Engineering Specialization

CEE181A

CEE181B

CEE181C

Engr. Design Elective

CEE111

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

General Education

General Education

General Education

Senior: Environmental Hydrology and Water Resources Specialization

CEE181A

CEE181B

CEE181C

Engr. Design Elective

CEE111

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

General Education

General Education

General Education

Senior: Structural Engineering Specialization

CEE181A

CEE181B

CEE181C

CEE153

CEE111

Spec. Elective

Engr. Design Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

General Education

General Education

General Education

Senior: Transportation Systems Engineering

CEE181A

CEE181B

CEE181C

Engr. Design Elective

CEE111

CEE123

Spec. Elective

CEE122

Spec. Elective

General Education

General Education

General Education

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

The sample program of study chart shown is typical for the accredited major in Civil Engineering. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a rigid set of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Therefore, the course sequence should not be changed except for the most compelling reasons. (Students who select the Environmental Engineering specialization within the Civil Engineering major should follow the Civil Engineering sample program.) Students must have their programs approved by their faculty advisor. Civil Engineering majors must consult at least once every year with the academic counselors in the Student Affairs Office and with their faculty advisors.

Undergraduate Major in Environmental Engineering

Program Educational Objectives: Graduates of the program will (1) establish an Environmental Engineering career in industry, government, or academia and achieve professional licensure as appropriate; (2) demonstrate excellence and innovation in engineering problem solving and design in a global and societal context; (3) commit to lifelong learning and professional development to stay current in technology and contemporary issues; and (4) take on increasing levels of responsibility and leadership in technical and/or managerial roles. (Program educational objectives are those aspects of engineering that help shape the curriculum; achievement of these objectives is a shared responsibility between the student and UCI.)

The curriculum includes a core of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology, as well as engineering mechanics and methods courses. Students may select from a variety of environmental engineering courses to fulfill the remaining portion of the program and to focus their environmental engineering training in one or more of the following areas: water supply and resources, waste water management, or atmospheric systems and air pollution control. Design experiences are integrated into environmental engineering courses, and seniors enroll in a capstone design course.

ADMISSIONS

High School Students: See pages 54-61.

Transfer Students. Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), one year of general chemistry (with laboratory), and one additional approved course for the major.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division course work may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at (949) 824-4334.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: See page 198.

Major Requirements:

Mathematics and Basic Science Courses: Mathematics 2A-B, 2D, 3A, 3D, and 2E; Physics 7C, 7LC; Physics 7D and 7LD; Chemistry 1A-B-C and 1LC-LD, Chemistry 51A. With approval of a faculty advisor, students select 4 units of Earth System Science and 4 units of Biological Sciences. Additional mathematics and basic science course work may be required depending on the student applied program.

Engineering Topics Courses: Students must complete a minimum of 19 units of engineering design.

   Core Courses: Engineering EECS10 or EECS12 or MAE10; CEE11; CEE20; CEE81A; CEE81B; CEE30; CEE80 or MAE80; MAE91; CEE110; CEE130 and 130L; CEE150 and 150L; CEE170; CEE160; CEE162; CEE181A-B-C.

   Engineering Elective Courses: Students must take two courses each from two of the following three groups and one course from the remaining groups.

   Water Supply and Resources: CEE171, CEE172, CEE173, CEE176, CEE178, Earth System Science 132.

   Environmental Processes: CEE163, CEE167.

   Atmospheric Systems and Air Pollution Control: MAE110, MAE115, MAE164, Earth System Science 112.

   All additional engineering topics courses needed to satisfy school and major requirements must be approved by the faculty advisor. Environmental Engineering is an inherently interdisciplinary program. Students interested in pursuing a dual degree with Environmental Engineering may be able to substitute appropriate course work for required courses stated above. Please consult with an Engineering academic or faculty advisor.

Engineering Professional Topics Courses: Economics 20A-B; CEE60 or Social Ecology E8; ENGR190W.

   (The nominal Environmental Engineering program requires 189 units of courses to satisfy all university and major requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary.)

At most an aggregate total of 6 units of 199 or H199 courses may be used to satisfy degree requirements.

PROGRAM OF STUDY

The sample program of study chart shown is typical for the major in Environmental Engineering. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a sequence of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Students who are not adequately prepared, or who wish to make changes in the sequence for other reasons, must have their programs approved by their faculty advisor. Environmental Engineering majors must consult at least once every year with the academic counselors in the Student Affairs Office and with their faculty advisors.

Sample Program of Study - Environmental Engineering

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

Chemistry 1A

Physics 7C, 7LC

Physics 7D, 7LD

EECS10 or EECS12

Chemistry 1B

Chemistry 1C, 1LC

General Education

General Education

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

Chemistry 51A, 1LD

CEE80 or MAE80

CEE11

CEE30

General Education

CEE20

CEE81A, 81B

General Education

MAE91

Junior

CEE150, 150L

CEE130, 130L

CEE110

CEE170

CEE162

CEE160

Science Elective

Engineering Elective

Science Elective

ENGR190W

General Education

General Education

Senior

CEE181A

CEE181B

CEE181C

Engineering Elective

Engineering Elective

Engineering Elective

General Education

Engineering Elective

General Education

General Education

General Education

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Graduate Study in Civil Engineering

Civil Engineering addresses the technology of constructed environments and, as such, embraces a wide range of intellectual endeavors. The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering focuses its graduate study and research program on three areas: Structural Engineering, including engineering mechanics, advanced composites, structural dynamics, earthquake engineering, and reliability and risk assessment; Transportation Systems Engineering, including traffic operations and management, advanced information technology applications, travel behavior, and transportation systems analysis; Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering, including hydrology, water resources, and remote sensing.

The Department offers the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Civil Engineering.

At the point of application a student is required to identify a thrust area. Specifically, the three thrust areas that have been identified for the Civil Engineering Graduate program are: Structural Engineering, Transportation Systems Engineering, and Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering. Once admitted, an advisor will be assigned according to the thrust area a student has chosen. Financial support through research or teaching assistantships and a variety of fellowships and scholarships is available to qualified students.

Structural Engineering: The Structural Engineering area emphasizes the application of analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches to the investigation of constructed facilities and systems that support or resist various loads. The objective of the program is to prepare graduates for leadership positions in industry and academic institutions by providing an opportunity to learn state-of-the-art methodologies applied to significant structural engineering problems. Specific interests include sensors and structural health monitoring, composites for infrastructure applications, reliability and risk assessment of civil engineering systems, structural control, system identification and damage detection, performance-based earthquake engineering, soil-structure interaction, smart materials and structures, multi-scale mechanistic analysis, and sustainable green materials and infrastructural systems.

Transportation Systems Engineering: Among leading centers for transportation research, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers a graduate research area that is distinguished by its interdisciplinary approach to the study of current and emerging urban transportation issues and by its unique relationship with the UC Irvine Institute of Transportation Studies. The research area focuses on the planning, design, operation, and management of complex transportation systems. Emphasis is on the development of fundamental knowledge in engineering, systems analysis, modeling, and planning, combined with advanced computational techniques and information technologies, to address transportation problems affecting urban travel and goods movement.

Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering: This area focuses on the distribution and transport of water among and between land, atmosphere, and oceans, the supply of water for municipal, agricultural, and environmental uses, and water-related hazards such as flooding and drought. Mathematical and computational modeling is germane to research activity in this area as well as professional practice, so course work is designed to develop theory-based mathematical modeling skill, on the one hand, as well as computational modeling skill on the other. Course work emphasizes important fundamentals such as mass, energy and momentum conservation principles, applied to hydrologic systems, and also increasingly important remote sensing and information technologies. Interdisciplinary study is an important dimension to hydrology and water resources, particularly in the areas of water quality, ecology, infrastructure systems, technology, and policy. Consequently, students are encouraged to take courses in these areas.

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

The M.S. degree reflects achievement of an advanced level of competence for the professional practice of civil engineering. Two plans are available to those working toward the M.S. degree: a thesis option and a course work option. Opportunities are available for part-time study toward the M.S. degree. The Plan of Study for both options must be developed in consultation with a Faculty Advisor and approved by the Program Graduate Advisor.

Plan I: Thesis Option

The thesis option requires completion of 48 units of study (a maximum of ten of which can be taken for study in conjunction with the thesis research topic); the completion of an original research project; the writing of the thesis describing it; and review by a thesis committee. Of the 48 units, a minimum of 28 units must be in nonresearch, graduate-level engineering courses (numbered 200-289) with at least 16 of 28 units from the CEE Department. The remaining units may be earned as graduate-level course work, individual research, or upper-division undergraduate units (maximum ten units).

Plan II: Course Work Option

The course work option requires the completion of 48 units of study, at least 40 of which must be in nonresearch graduate-level engineering courses (numbered 200-289) with at least 28 of 40 units from the CEE Department. The remaining eight units may be earned as graduate-level course work, individual research, or upper-division undergraduate units.

NOTE: Students who entered prior to fall of 2012 should follow the course requirements outlined within the Catalogue of the year they entered. The change in number of units per course is not intended to change the course requirements for the degree nor to have any impact in the number of courses students are taking. As such, students will need to continue to meet the same high standards and plan of study requirements as previously required. Students will work with their advisor to create a plan of study encompassing the equivalent topical requirements, as well as the equivalent number of courses to the previous 36-unit requirement.

Concurrent Master's Degree Program with Planning, Policy, and Design

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) and the Department of Planning, Policy, and Design (PPD) in the School of Social Ecology offer a concurrent degree program that allows students to earn both a master's in Civil Engineering (M.S.) and a master's in Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) in two years (instead of more than three years if these degrees were pursued sequentially). The concurrent degree program requires 84 units of study and is organized around two tracks: (1) transportation systems, and (2) environmental hydrology and water resources. The program core comprises 15 graduate courses for the transportation systems track, and 13 graduate and two undergraduate courses for the environmental hydrology and water resources track.

Students choose between a thesis option and a comprehensive examination option. The thesis option requires completion of 84 units of study (a maximum of ten of which may be taken in conjunction with the thesis research); completion of an original research project and the writing of a thesis to describe it; completion of required core courses; and completion of enough units of approved electives to meet the total requirement of 84 units. The comprehensive examination option also requires completion of 84 units of study as well as a professional report, which represents a substantial piece of planning practice, as the capstone event. These units of study include core courses and enough units of approved electives to meet the total requirement of 84 units, with no redundancy of core courses in either CEE or PPD. Electives may include as many as ten units of independent study or approved undergraduate courses.

Undergraduates seeking admission to the concurrent master's degree program should have a strong record of course work in disciplines related to civil engineering and urban planning, and they must meet the requirements for admission in both departments. See http://www.eng.uci.edu/grad/programs/cee/admissions, and http://ppd.soceco.uci.edu/pages/admissions for more information about these requirements.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE

The Ph.D. degree indicates attainment of an original and significant research contribution to the state-of-the-art in the candidate's field, and an ability to communicate advanced engineering concepts. The doctoral program is tailored to the individual needs and background of the student. The detailed program of study for each Ph.D. student is formulated in consultation with a faculty advisor who takes into consideration the objectives and preparation of the candidate. The program of study must be approved by the faculty advisor and the Graduate Advisor of the Department.

There are no specific course requirements. Within this flexible framework, the School maintains specific guidelines that outline the milestones of a typical doctoral program. All doctoral students should consult the Civil Engineering program's guidelines for details, but there are several milestones to be passed: admission to the Ph.D. program by the faculty; early assessment of the student's research potential (this includes a preliminary examination), research preparation, formal advancement to candidacy by passing the qualifying examination in the third year (second year for students who entered with a master's degree), completion of a significant research investigation, and the submission and oral defense of an acceptable dissertation. There is no foreign language requirement. Ph.D. students have to meet departmental research requirements as a research assistant or equivalent, with or without salary. The degree is granted upon the recommendation of the Doctoral Committee and the Dean of Graduate Studies. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years (four years for students who entered with a master's degree). The maximum time permitted is seven years.

THE INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

The Institute of Transportation Studies at Irvine (ITS) is part of a multicampus research unit of the University of California. ITS Irvine consists of faculty, staff, and graduate and undergraduate students engaged at the forefront of knowledge in interdisciplinary transportation research and education. Currently, the Institute involves faculty and students from The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, the School of Social Sciences, the School of Social Ecology, The Paul Merage School of Business, and the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences. Collaborations with colleagues from outside the University are common. The mission of the Institute is to create and disseminate significant new knowledge to help solve society's pressing transportation problems, both in California and globally. It achieves this through cutting-edge activities in research, education, and professional outreach. A characteristic of ITS Irvine transportation research is a systems approach, focusing on the areas of planning, policy, economics (including pricing and finance), operations (including traffic, transit, logistics and freight, and safety), energy and the environment, and information technologies. The Institute has close ties to the University's Transportation Science interdisciplinary graduate degree program. Students choosing to focus their studies in transportation will find strong interdisciplinary opportunities between the Department and ITS. See the Office of Research section of the Catalogue for additional information.

THE URBAN WATER RESEARCH CENTER

The Urban Water Research Center focuses on five integrating water issues in urban areas: (1) supply, demand, and distribution; (2) water quality; (3) urban ecology; (4) water reuse; and (5) institutions and public policy. In each of these areas the Center enables the issues to be addressed in an integrated way from the points of view of biology, earth systems, economics, engineering public policy, and public health. The Center is the collaborative effort of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the Department of Earth System Science, and the School of Social Ecology.

Graduate Concentration in Environmental Engineering

E4130 Engineering Gateway; (949) 824-5333
C. Sunny Jiang, Director and Graduate Advisor

Faculty

Students may pursue either the M.S. or Ph.D. degree in Engineering with a concentration in Environmental Engineering.

Environmental Engineering is an interdisciplinary program engaging faculty from departments in both engineering and the sciences, and managed by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Environmental Engineering addresses the development of strategies to control anthropogenic emissions of pollutants to the atmosphere, waterways, and terrestrial environment; the remediation of polluted natural systems; the design of technologies to treat waste, energy efficiency and environmentally responsible power generation; and the evaluation of contaminant fate in the environment.

Environmental Engineering requires a curriculum that provides students with an understanding of fundamentals in air- and water-quality sciences, contaminant fate and transport, global climate change, water resources, energy, and design concepts for pollutant emission control and treatment.

Required Background

The program core curriculum builds on environmental engineering fundamentals such as fluid mechanics, environmental chemistry, air quality, microbial processes, thermodynamics, and reactor theory and design. The interdisciplinary nature of the program allows students with a variety of science and engineering backgrounds to undertake studies in this field. Students admitted to the program lacking one or more fundamental courses can earn credit toward the M.S. degree by completing these courses at UC Irvine. Students entering the program are expected to have had exposure to engineering-level math that includes linear algebra, differential equations and statistics.

The degree to which each student meets the program's background requirement is determined by a faculty committee at the time of admission. Students with an insufficient background who are offered admission will be required to take a set of appropriate prerequisite undergraduate courses before entering the program.

In addition, M.S. students may use a limited amount of upper-division undergraduate course work taken to meet the background requirement in partial fulfillment of graduate degree requirements.

Although this list is not exhaustive, commonly required prerequisite courses within each of the required background areas are as follows:

Air Quality and Energy: Engineering MAE110 or MAE164, and MAE115.

Environmental Chemistry: CEE162 or Earth System Science 102.

Environmental Microbiology: CBEMS112 or CBEMS116/216.

Fluid Mechanics: CEE170, CBEMS120A, or MAE130A.

Reactor Theory and Design: CBEMS110, CEE160.

Core Requirement

Students must complete an advanced mathematics course, either CBEMS230 (Applied Engineering Mathematics I), CEE283 (Mathematical Methods in Engineering Analysis), or MAE200B (Engineering Analysis II). Two quarters of environmental seminar (CEE295) are required for both the M.S. and Ph.D. degree.

Areas of Emphasis

There are four primary areas of emphasis within Environmental Engineering: Water Quality and Treatment, Hydrology and Water Resources, Air Quality, and Energy. To achieve the interdisciplinary objectives of the program, students are required to take at least one course from each of the four primary areas of environmental engineering. Students can take additional elective courses in one of the four areas or from more than one area. Courses outside of the School of Engineering (i.e., Earth System Science, Public Health, Biological Sciences) can be used toward elective credits with the approval of the faculty advisor and the graduate director. Courses within each of the emphasis areas in Engineering are listed below.

Water Quality and Treatment: CBEMS210 (Reaction Engineering), CBEMS216 (Field Practicum in Environmental Engineering), CBEMS218 (Bioengineering with Recombinant Microorganisms), CBEMS220 (Transport Phenomena), CEE260 (Desalination), CEE261 (Applied Environmental Microbiology), CEE263 (Advanced Biological Treatment Processes), CEE264 (Carbon Footprint Analysis of Water and Wastewater Systems), CEE265 (Advanced Physical-Chemical Treatment Processes), CEE266 (Drinking Water and Wastewater Biotechnology), CEE267 (Ecology of Coastal Waters), Earth System Science 262 (Global Biogeochemical Cycles).

Hydrology and Water Resources: CEE271 (Flow in Unsaturated Media), CEE272 (Groundwater Hydrology), CEE273 (Hydrologic Modeling), CEE275 (Topics in Coastal Engineering), CEE276 (Hydrology), CEE277 (Hydrologic Transport Fundamentals), CEE278 (Fluid Mechanics of Open Channels), CEE279 (Hydrologic Computational Modeling), CEE290 (Merging Models and Data), Earth System Science 203 (Earth System Change).

Air Quality: MAE260 (Current Issues Related to Tropospheric and Stratospheric Processes), MAE261 (Air Quality Modeling), Earth System Science 220 (Earth System Climatology).

Energy: CEE264 (Carbon Footprint Analysis for Water and Wastewater Systems), MAE210 (Advanced Fundamentals of Combustion), MAE214 (Fuel-Cell Fundamentals and Technology), MAE215 (Advanced Combustion Technology), MAE218 (Sustainable Energy Systems), MAE230A (Inviscid Incompressible Fluid Mechanics I), MAE231 (Fundamentals of Turbulence), MAE233 (Turbulent Free Shear Flows).

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

Two options are available for M.S. degree students: a thesis option and a comprehensive examination option. Both options require the completion of at least 48 units of study.

Plan I. Thesis Option

A thesis option is available to students who prefer to conduct a focused research project. Students selecting this option must complete an original research investigation and a thesis, and obtain approval of the thesis by a thesis committee. Of the 48 required units, at least 28 units must be nonresearch, graduate-level courses. A maximum of 16 M.S. research units and up to ten units of upper-division undergraduate elective courses may be applied to the degree with the prior approval of the Graduate Advisor.

Plan II. Comprehensive Examination Option

Alternatively, students may select a course work option in which they must successfully complete 48 units of study and pass a comprehensive examination. At least 36 units must be nonresearch, graduate-level courses. A maximum of eight M.S. research units and up to ten units of upper-division undergraduate elective courses may be applied to the degree with the prior approval of the Graduate Advisor.

NOTE: Students who entered prior to fall of 2012 should follow the course requirements outlined within the Catalogue of the year they entered. The change in number of units per course is not intended to change the course requirements for the degree nor to have any impact in the number of courses students are taking. As such, students will need to continue to meet the same high standards and plan of study requirements as previously required. Students will work with their advisor to create a plan of study encompassing the equivalent topical requirements, as well as the equivalent number of courses to the previous 36-unit requirement.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE

The Ph.D. concentration in Environmental Engineering requires the achievement of original and significant research that advances the discipline. Doctoral students are selected on the basis of an outstanding record of scholarship and potential for research excellence.

The doctoral study program is tailored to the individual student in consultation with a faculty advisory committee. Students entering with a master's degree may be required to take additional course work, to be decided in consultation with the graduate advisor and the program director. Students without a master's degree may be admitted into the Ph.D. program. However, these students will be required to complete the degree requirements above for the master's degree prior to working on doctoral studies. Within this flexible framework, the School maintains specific guidelines that outline the milestones of a typical doctoral program. All doctoral students should consult the Environmental Engineering program guidelines for details, but there are several milestones to be passed: admission to the Ph.D. program by the faculty, passage within the first year of a preliminary examination, formal advancement to candidacy by passing a qualifying examination in the third year (or second year for students who entered with a master's degree), completion of a significant research investigation, and the submission and oral defense of an acceptable dissertation.

Committees for preliminary and Ph.D. qualifying examinations and the doctoral committee must have at least one Environmental Engineering faculty member from outside the student's area of emphasis. The student's dissertation topic must be approved by the student's doctoral committee.

The degree is granted upon the recommendation of the doctoral committee and the Dean of Graduate Division. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years (four years for students who entered with a master's degree). The maximum time permitted is seven years.