DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

2213 Engineering Hall; (949) 824-4821
http://www.eng.uci.edu/dept/eecs
Michael Green, Department Chair

Faculty / Undergraduate Program / Graduate Program / Courses

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is a broad field encompassing such diverse subject areas as computer systems, distributed computing, computer networks, control, electronics, photonics, digital systems, circuits (analog, digital, mixed-mode, and power electronics), communications, signal processing, electromagnetics, and physics of semiconductor devices. Knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences is applied to the theory, design, and implementation of devices and systems for the benefit of society. The Department offers two ABET-accredited undergraduate degrees: Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering. In addition, the Department offers a joint undergraduate degree in Computer Science and Engineering, in conjunction with the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences; information is available in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

Some electrical engineers focus on the study of electronic devices and circuits that are the basic building blocks of complex electronic systems. Others study power electronics and the generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy. A large group of electrical engineers studies the application of these complex systems to other areas, including medicine, biology, geology, and ecology. Still another group studies complex electronic systems such as automatic controls, telecommunications, wireless communications, and signal processing.

Computer engineers are trained in various fields of computer science and engineering. They engage in the design and analysis of digital computers and networks, including software and hardware. Computer design includes topics such as computer architecture, VLSI circuits, computer graphics, design automation, system software, data structures and algorithms, distributed computing, and computer networks. Computer Engineering courses include programming in high-level languages such as Python, C++ and Java; use of software packages for analysis and design; design of system software such as operating systems; design of hardware/software interfaces and embedded systems; and application of computers in solving engineering problems. Laboratories in both hardware and software experiences are integrated within the Computer Engineering curriculum.

The undergraduate curricula in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering provide a solid foundation for future career growth, enabling graduates' careers to grow technically, administratively, or both. Many electrical and computer engineers will begin work in a large organizational environment as members of an engineering team, obtaining career satisfaction from solving meaningful problems that contribute to the success of the organization's overall goal. As their careers mature, technical growth most naturally results from the acquisition of an advanced degree and further development of the basic thought processes instilled in the undergraduate years. Administrative growth can result from the development of management skills on the job and/or through advanced degree programs in management.

Graduates of Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Computer Science and Engineering will find a variety of career opportunities in areas including wireless communication, voice and video coding, biomedical electronics, circuit design, optical devices and communication, semiconductor devices and fabrication, power systems, power electronics, computer hardware and software design, computer networks, design of computer-based control systems, application software, data storage and retrieval, computer graphics, pattern recognition, computer modeling, parallel computing, and operating systems.

Undergraduate Major in Computer Engineering

Program Educational Objectives: Graduates of the program will (1) be engaged in professional practice at or beyond the entry level or enrolled in high-quality graduate programs building on a solid foundation in engineering, mathematics, the sciences, humanities and social sciences, and experimental practice as well as modern engineering methods; (2) be innovative in the design, research and implementation of systems and products with strong problem solving, communication, teamwork, leadership, and entrepreneurial skills; (3) proactively function with creativity, integrity and relevance in the ever-changing global environment by applying their fundamental knowledge and experience to solve real-world problems with an understanding of societal, economic, environmental, and ethical issues. (Program educational objectives are those aspects of engineering that help shape the curriculum; achievement of these objectives is a shared responsibility between the student and UCI.)

The undergraduate Computer Engineering curriculum includes a core of mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Engineering courses in fundamental areas fill in much of the remaining curriculum.

ADMISSIONS

High School Students: See page 197.

Transfer Students. Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), one course in computational methods (e.g., C, C++), and two additional approved courses for the major.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division course work may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at (949) 824-4334.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: See page 198.

Major Requirements:

Mathematics and Basic Science Courses: Mathematics 2A-B, 2D, 3A, 3D, and ICS 6D; Physics 7C, 7LC; Physics 7D-E, 7LD; Engineering EECS145.

Engineering Topics Courses: Students must complete a minimum of 26 units of engineering design.

   Core Courses: Engineering EECS1, EECS12, EECS20, EECS22, EECS22L, EECS31, EECS31L, EECS40, EECS50, EECS55, EECS70A, EECS70LA, EECS70B, EECS70LB, EECS111, EECS112, EECS112L, EECS113, EECS114, EECS118, EECS119, EECS129A-B, EECS148, EECS150, EECS170A, EECS170LA, EECS170B, EECS170LB. With the approval of a faculty advisor, students select any additional engineering topics courses needed to satisfy school and department requirements.

   Engineering Elective Courses: Students select, with the approval of a faculty advisor, a minimum of three courses of engineering topics. At least two courses must be chosen from EECS105, EECS107, EECS116, EECS117, EECS123, and Computer Science 142A. Additionally, EECS101, EECS141A, EECS141B, EECS152A, EECS152B, EECS170D, EECS199 or EECSH199 (up to 3 units) are approved as technical electives.

Engineering Professional Topics Course: ENGR190W.

At most an aggregate total of 6 units of 199 or H199 courses may be used to satisfy degree requirements; 199 and H199 courses are open to students with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

   (The nominal Computer Engineering program will require 188 units of courses to satisfy all university and major requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary.)

PLANNING A PROGRAM OF STUDY

The sample program of study chart shown is typical for the major in Computer Engineering. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a sequence of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Students who are not adequately prepared, or who wish to make changes in the sequence for other reasons, must have their program approved by their advisor. Computer Engineering majors must consult at least once every year with the academic counselors in the Student Affairs Office and with their faculty advisor.

Sample Program of Study - Computer Engineering

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

EECS12

ICS 6D

Physics 7D, 7LD

General Education

Physics 7C, 7LC

EECS1

General Education

General Education

EECS20

EECS31

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

EECS40

Physics 7E

EECS22L

EECS50

EECS22

EECS55

EECS70B, 70LB

ECS31L

EECS70A, 70LA

General Education

Junior

EECS112

EECS112L

EECS111

EECS114

EECS150

EECS113

EECS145

EECS170B, 170LB

EECS118

EECS170A, 170LA

General Education

General Education

Senior

EECS119

EECS129B

Technical Elective

EECS129A

ENGR190W

General Education

EECS148

Technical Elective

General Education

Technical Elective

General Education

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Undergraduate Major in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE)

This program is administered jointly by the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering and the Department of Computer Science in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences. For information, see the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue, See page 375.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

Major Requirements: See See page 376 in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

Undergraduate Major in Electrical Engineering

Program Educational Objectives: Graduates of the program will (1) engage in professional practice in academia, industry, or government; (2) promote innovation in the design, research and implementation of products and services in the field of electrical engineering through strong communication, leadership and entrepreneurial skills; (3) engage in life-long learning in the field of electrical engineering. (Program educational objectives are those aspects of engineering that help shape the curriculum; achievement of these objectives is a shared responsibility between the student and UCI.)

The undergraduate Electrical Engineering curriculum is built around a basic core of humanities, mathematics, and natural and engineering science courses. It is arranged to provide the fundamentals of synthesis and design that will enable graduates to begin careers in industry or to go on to graduate study. UCI Electrical Engineering students take courses in network analysis, electronics, electronic system design, signal processing, control systems, electromagnetics, and computer engineering. They learn to design circuits and systems to meet specific needs and to use modern computers in problem analysis and solution.

Electrical Engineering majors have the opportunity to select a specialization in Electro-optics and Solid-State Devices; and Systems and Signal Processing. In addition to the courses offered by the Department, the major program includes selected courses from the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences.

ADMISSIONS

High School Students: See page 197.

Transfer Students. Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: one year of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), one course in computational methods (e.g., C, C++), and two additional approved courses for the major.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division course work may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at (949) 824-4334.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: See page 198.

Major Requirements:

Mathematics and Basic Science Courses: Mathematics 2A-B, 2D, 3A, 3D, and 2E; Chemistry 1A; Physics 7C, 7LC; Physics 7D-E, 7LD, 51A; Engineering EECS145.

Engineering Topics Courses: Students must complete each of the following courses and accumulate a minimum of 28 units of engineering design, EECS1, EECS10, EECS31, EECS31L, EECS50, EECS55, EECS70A, EECS70LA, EECS70B and EECS70LB, EECS150, EECS160A, EECS160LA, EECS170A, EECS170LA, EECS170B, EECS170LB, EECS170C, EECS170LC, EECS180A, EECS189A-B.

Electrical Engineering Specialization: Students must satisfy the requirements for one of the five specializations listed below.

Technical Elective Courses: In addition to a specialization, and with approval of a faculty advisor, students must select a minimum of three other technical elective courses, comprising of at least 10 units. At least one of these courses must be from outside the student's specialization. All EECS courses not required for the major are approved as technical electives. Four (4) units of 199 course work count as one technical elective.

Engineering Professional Topics Course: ENGR190W.

At most an aggregate total of 6 units of 199 or H199 courses may be used to satisfy degree requirements; 199 and H199 courses are open to students with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

   (The nominal Electrical Engineering program will require 189 units of courses to satisfy all university and major requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary.)

Specialization in Electronic Circuit Design: Students must complete Engineering EECS170D, EECS170E. Students must select an additional four courses from the following list: Engineering EECS166A, EECS166B, EECS174, EECS176, EECS179, EECS182, or EECS188.

Specialization in Semiconductors and Optoelectronics: Students must complete Physics 52A and Engineering EECS174, EECS188. Students must select an additional three courses from the following list: Engineering ENGR54, EECS170D, EECS176, EECS179, EECS180B, or EECS180C.

Specialization in RF, Antennas and Microwaves: Students must complete Engineering EECS144, EECS180B, EECS182, Students must select an additional three courses from the following list: Physics 52A, Engineering EECS170D, EECS170E, EECS180C, or EECS188.

Specialization in Digital Signal Processing: Students must complete Engineering EECS152A, EECS152B. Students must select an additional four courses from the following list: Engineering EECS20 or CSE25, EECS22, EECS101, EECS112, EECS141A, EECS141B, or EECS160B.

Specialization in Communications: Students must complete Engineering EECS141A, EECS141B. Student must select an additional four courses from the following list: Engineering EECS20 or CSE25, EECS22, EECS144, EECS148, EECS152A, EECS152B, EECS170E, or EECS188.

PROGRAM OF STUDY

Listed below are sample programs for each of the five specializations within Electrical Engineering. These sample programs are typical for the accredited major in Electrical Engineering. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a rigid set of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Therefore, the course sequence should not be changed except for the most compelling reasons. Students who are not adequately prepared, or who wish to make changes in the sequence for other reasons, must have their programs approved by their advisor. Electrical Engineering majors must consult with the academic counselors in the Student Affairs Office and with their faculty advisors at least once a year.

Sample Program of Study - Electrical Engineering (Electronic Circuit Design Specialization)

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

EECS10

Physics 7C, 7LC

Physics 7D, 7LD

General Education

Chemistry 1A

EECS1

General Education

General Education

EECS31

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

Physics 7E

EECS55

Physics 51A

EECS31L

EECS70A, 70LA

EECS50

General Education

General Education

EECS70B, 70LB

Junior

EECS145

EECS150

EECS170C, 170LC

EECS170A, 170LA

EECS170B, 170LB

General Education

General Education

EECS180A

General Education

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Senior

EECS160A, 160LA

EECS170E

General Education

EECS170D

EECS189B

Technical Elective

EECS189A

ENGR190W

Technical Elective

Spec. Elective

Technical Elective

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Sample Program of Study - Electrical Engineering (Semiconductors and Optoelectronics)

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

EECS10

Physics 7C, 7LC

Physics 7D, 7LD

General Education

Chemistry 1A

EECS1

General Education

General Education

EECS31

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

Physics 7E

EECS55

Physics 51A

Physics 52A

EECS70A, 70LA

EECS50

EECS31L

General Education

EECS70B, 70LB

Junior

EECS145

EECS170B, 170LB

EECS170C, 170LC

EECS170A, 170LA

EECS174

EECS188

General Education

EECS180A

General Education

General Education

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Senior

EECS160A, 160LA

EECS150

General Education

EECS189A

EECS189B

Technical Elective

General Education

ENGR190W

Technical Elective

Spec. Elective

Technical Elective

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Sample Program of Study - Electrical Engineering (RF, Antennas and Microwaves)

Fall

Winter

Spring

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

EECS10

Physics 7C, 7LC

Physics 7D, 7LD

General Education

Chemistry 1A

EECS1

General Education

General Education

EECS31

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

Physics 7E

EECS55

Physics 51A

EECS31L

EECS70A, 70LA

EECS50

General Education

General Education

EECS70B, 70LB

Junior

EECS145

EECS150

EECS144

EECS170A, 170LA

EECS170B, 170LB

EECS170C, 170LC

General Education

EECS180A

EECS180B

General Education

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Senior

EECS160A, 160LA

General Education

General Education

EECS182

EECS189B

Technical Elective

EECS189A

ENGR190W

Technical Elective

Spec. Elective

Technical Elective

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Sample Program of Study - Electrical Engineering (Digital Signal Processing Specialization)

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

EECS10

Physics 7C, 7LC

Physics 7D, 7LD

General Education

Chemistry 1A

EECS1

General Education

General Education

EECS31

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

Physics 7E

EECS55

Physics 51A

EECS31L

EECS70A, 70LA

EECS50

General Education

General Education

EECS70B, 70LB

Junior

EECS145

EECS150

EECS170C, 170LC

EECS152A

EECS152B

General Education

EECS170A, 170LA

EECS170B, 170LB

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Senior

EECS160A, 160LA

EECS180A

General Education

EECS189A

EECS189B

General Education

General Education

ENGR190W

Technical Elective

Technical Elective

Technical Elective

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Sample Program of Study - Electrical Engineering (Communication Specialization)

Fall

Winter

Spring

Freshman

Mathematics 2A

Mathematics 2B

Mathematics 2D

EECS10

Physics 7C, 7LC

Physics 7D, 7LD

General Education

Chemistry 1A

EECS1

General Education

General Education

EECS31

Sophomore

Mathematics 3A

Mathematics 3D

Mathematics 2E

Physics 7E

EECS55

Physics 51A

EECS31L

EECS70A, 70LA

EECS50

General Education

General Education

EECS70B, 70LB

Junior

EECS145

EECS150

EECS170C, 170LC

EECS170A, 170LA

EECS170B, 170LB

General Education

General Education

EECS180A

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Spec. Elective

Senior

EECS141A

EECS141B

General Education

EECS160A, 160LA

EECS189B

General Education

EECS189A

ENGR190W

Technical Elective

Technical Elective

Technical Elective

Students must obtain approval for their program of study and must see their faculty advisor at least once each year.

Graduate Study in Electrical and Computer Engineering

The Department offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering with a concentration in Electrical Engineering and in Computer Engineering. Because most graduate courses are not repeated every quarter, students should make every effort to begin their graduate program in the fall.

Detailed descriptions of the two concentrations are as follows.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION (EE)

The Electrical Engineering faculty study the following areas: optical and solid-state devices, including quantum electronics and optics, integrated electro-optics and acoustics, design of semiconductor devices and materials, analog and mixed-signal IC design, microwave and microwave devices, and scanning acoustic microscopy; systems engineering and signal processing, including communication theory, machine vision, signal processing, power electronics, neural networks, communications networks, systems engineering, and control systems. Related communication networks topics are also addressed by the Networked Systems M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (listed in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue).

COMPUTER ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION (CpE)

The concentration in Computer Engineering provides students with a solid base in the design, development, and evaluation of computer systems. Thrust areas include computer architecture, software, and embedded systems, but the program is highly customizable to the specific interests of the student. The research activities of the faculty in this concentration include parallel and distributed computer systems, distributed software architectures and databases, ultra-reliable real-time computer systems, VLSI architectures, reconfigurable computing, computer design automation, low-power design, embedded systems, computer communication protocols, computer networks, security, programming languages for parallel/distributed processing, knowledge management, service-oriented architectures, and software engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

Two plans are offered for the M.S. degree: a thesis option and a comprehensive examination option. For either option, students are required to develop a complete program of study with advice from their faculty advisor. The graduate advisor must approve the study plan. Part-time study toward the M.S. degree is available. The program of study must be completed within four calendar years from first enrollment.

Plan I: Thesis Option

The thesis option requires completion of 12 courses of study; an original research investigation; the completion of an M.S. thesis; and approval of the thesis by a thesis committee. The thesis committee is composed of three full-time faculty members with the faculty advisor of the student serving as the chair. Required undergraduate core courses and graduate seminar courses, such as EECS292, EECS293, EECS294, and EECS295, may not be counted toward the 12 courses. No more than one course of EECS299 and one undergraduate elective course may be counted toward the 12 courses. Up to four of the required 12 courses may be from EECS296 (M.S. Thesis Research) with the approval of the student's thesis advisor. Additional concentration-specific requirements are as follows; a list of core and concentration courses is given at the end of this section.

Electrical Engineering Concentration: At least seven concentration courses in the Electrical Engineering concentration (EE) must be completed.

Computer Engineering Concentration: Three core courses in the Computer Engineering concentration (CpE) must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. At least four additional concentration or approved courses must also be completed.

Plan II: Comprehensive Examination Option

The comprehensive examination option requires the completion of 12 courses and a comprehensive examination. Only one EECS299 course can be counted if the EECS299 course is four or more units. Undergraduate core courses and graduate seminar courses, such as EECS292, EECS293, EECS294, and EECS295, may not be counted toward the 12 courses requirement. No more than two of undergraduate elective courses may be counted. In fulfillment of the comprehensive examination element of the M.S. degree program, students will complete two term paper-length reports on the current state-of-the-art of two separate technical fields corresponding to the concentration area. The term papers are completed as part of the end-of-course requirements for EECS294 (Electrical and Computer Colloquium), two courses of which are needed to fulfill degree requirements. Each term paper must be completed with a grade of B or better; and each Colloquium section used to meet M.S. degree requirements must be completed with a satisfactory grade. Both Colloquium sections must be completed at the student's first opportunity upon enrollment in the ECE graduate program. Additional concentration-specific requirements are as follows; a list of core and concentration courses is given at the end of this section.

Electrical Engineering Concentration: Students enrolled in the Electrical Engineering (EE) concentration who choose the Comprehensive Examination option must select one of the following plans of study.

Circuits and Devices Plan of Study: At least four courses from the following list must be completed: EECS270A, EECS270B, EECS277A, EECS277B, EECS280A, EECS285A. At least five additional courses from the list of EE concentration courses must be completed.

Systems Plan of Study: At least four courses from the following list must be completed*: EECS240, EECS241A, EECS250, EECS251A, EECS260A, EECS267A. At least five additional courses from the list of EE concentration courses must be completed.

*If all six courses are not offered in an academic year, students who graduate in that year can petition to replace the courses that are not offered by EECS242 and/or EECS244.

Computer Engineering Concentration: Three core courses in the Computer Engineering concentration (CpE) must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. At least five additional concentration or approved courses must also be completed.

List of Concentration Courses

Electrical Engineering Concentration: EECS202A-B, EECS203A, EECS210, EECS213, EECS215, EECS217, EECS240, EECS241A-B, EECS242, EECS243, EECS244, EECS245, EECS248A, EECS250, EECS251A-B, EECS260A, EECS261A, EECS267A-B, EECS270A, EECS270B-C-D, EECS272, EECS274, EECS275A-B, EECS277A-B-C, EECS278, EECS279, EECS280A, EECS280B, EECS282, EECS285A, EECS285B.

Computer Engineering Concentration: EECS210, EECS211*, EECS213*, EECS215*, EECS217, EECS218, EECS219, EECS221, EECS222A-B-C, EECS223, EECS224, EECS226, EECS230, EECS248A, Computer Science 233, 234, 236.

(courses denoted with * are also core courses)

NOTE: Students who entered prior to fall of 2012 should follow the course requirements outlined within the Catalogue of the year they entered. The change in number of units per course is not intended to change the course requirements for the degree nor to have any impact in the number of courses students are taking. As such, students will need to continue to meet the same high standards and plan of study requirements as previously required. Students will work with their advisor to create a plan of study encompassing the equivalent topical requirements, as well as the equivalent number of courses to the previous 36-unit requirement.

In addition to fulfilling the course requirements outlined above, it is a University requirement for the Master of Science degree that students fulfill a minimum of 36 units of study.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

The doctoral program in Electrical and Computer Engineering is tailored to the individual background and interest of the student. There are several milestones to pass: admission to the Ph.D. program by the Graduate Committee; Ph.D. preliminary examination on the background and potential for success in the doctoral program; departmental teaching requirement which can be satisfied through service as a teaching assistant or equivalent; original research work; development of a research report and dissertation proposal; advancement to Ph.D. candidacy in the third year (second year for students who entered with a master's degree) through the Ph.D. qualifying examination conducted on behalf of the Irvine Division of the Academic Senate; completion of a significant research investigation; and completion and approval of a dissertation. A public Ph.D. dissertation defense is also required. During the Ph.D. study, four quarters of EECS294 must be completed.

The Ph.D. preliminary examination is conducted twice a year, in the spring and fall quarters. Detailed requirements for each concentration are specified in the departmental Ph.D. preliminary examination policies, available from the EECS Graduate Admissions Office. The depth examination is conducted during each spring quarter. A student who already has an M.S. on enrollment must pass the Ph.D. preliminary examination within one complete academic year cycle after entering the Ph.D. program. A student who does not already have an M.S. on enrollment must pass the Ph.D. preliminary examination within two complete academic year cycles after entering the Ph.D. program. A student has only two chances to take and pass the Ph.D. preliminary examination. A student who fails the Ph.D. preliminary examination twice will be asked to withdraw from the program, or will be dismissed from the program, and may not be readmitted into the program.

The Ph.D. degree is granted upon the recommendation of the Doctoral Committee and the Dean of Graduate Studies. Part-time study toward the Ph.D. degree is not permitted. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years (four years for students who entered with a master's degree). The maximum time permitted is seven years.