DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

435 Humanities Instructional Building; (949) 824-6712
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/english/
James Steintrager, Department Chair

Faculty / Undergraduate Program / Graduate Program / Courses

Faculty in the Department of English include literary theorists and literary historians, rhetoricians, fiction writers, and poets. Students in the Department thus have the opportunity to explore a variety of models for literary analysis while examining the nature and value of literature. English majors learn to interpret written works with the tools of rhetorical and culture analysis; they become familiar with English and American literary history, as well as non-Anglo-American literatures in English; and they are introduced to the history of criticism and theory. At the same time, they learn to do research using both traditional and electronic resources, and they gain practice at producing effective professional writing, whether critical, journalistic, fictional, or poetic.

CAREERS FOR THE ENGLISH OR LITERARY JOURNALISM MAJOR

The study of literature helps students express their ideas clearly, do independent research, and think analytically and imaginatively. These capabilities will help qualify majors for careers in education, law, technical writing, communications, journalism, public relations, business, and management. Departmental advisors encourage their students to investigate various career options before completing their undergraduate educations.

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. See the Career Center section for additional information.

Undergraduate Program

All of the Department's areas of study emphasize a variety of critical approaches in the reading and criticism of literature. Two majors, as well as an emphasis in Creative Writing, are offered.

English. This major seeks to introduce students to the entire range of literatures written in English, from British and American to African, Asian, and Australasian literatures. The major emphasizes the differences among historical periods and various genres, and encourages exploration of a broad range of literary theories. It also offers students the opportunity to do significant work in Creative Writing.

Creative Writing This emphasis within the English major provides a setting in which students write original work and subject it to critique in peer workshops led by instructors who are themselves writers. The disciplines of close reading and practical criticism are taken up in the lecture classes.

Literary Journalism. This major was created to meet the needs of a growing number of students who wish to read, study, and write nonfiction prose that has transcended the limits of daily journalism. This is prose that has evolved into a distinct branch of literature, prose that adopts the aims and techniques of the finest fiction. The program provides majors with a solid foundation in nonfiction writing and an equally solid background in areas such as literary history, which together will help make students more informed writers.

Literary Journalism majors take three intensive writing seminars, and are expected to develop a portfolio of work by graduation which they can present as evidence of their skill for purposes of employment or future education. At the same time, majors are asked to take a comprehensive look at the theory, history, and context of literary journalism. Among other forms, they study and write narratives, memoirs, profiles, histories, and personal essays, in subject areas as varied as science, politics, justice, travel, sports, food, and popular culture.

While it differs from an applied journalism major that focuses primarily on newspaper writing, the major in Literary Journalism is excellent preparation for students planning to enter graduate programs in journalism, as well as for those interested in the many careers requiring sophisticated writing and communication skills.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. DEGREE

University Requirements: See pages 54-61.

School Requirements: See page 260.

Departmental Requirements for the English Major

A.   English 28A (or 28D), 28B, and 28C (or 28E).

B.   English 100, 101 (taken in satisfaction of upper-division writing).

C.   English 102A, 102B, 102C, 102D, 105, 106.

D.   At least three more Departmental (English, Literary Journalism, Writing) courses numbered 102 or above, excluding English 150, Writing 139, or Writing 179. An upper-division foreign literature-in-translation course may be substituted for one of the three courses.*

E.   Completion of one of the following:

1.   Two years of work in a single acceptable modern foreign language (through 2C) or equivalent, plus either one course in a foreign literature in which texts are read in the original language or two upper-division courses in foreign literatures in translation.*

2.   Greek or Latin 1A-B-C and either 100A and two 103s, or 100B and two 104s.

3.   Chinese 3C, Korean 3C, Japanese 3C, or Vietnamese 3C. NOTE: If a student is exempted from 3C based on examination or equivalent, a course in which texts are read in Chinese, Korean, Japanese, or Vietnamese is required.

   *Foreign literature-in-translation courses are offered in Classics, Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Literatures, French and Italian, German, and Spanish and Portuguese. Chinese 180, Comparative Literature 150 and 160, East Asian Languages and Literatures 160, Film and Media Studies 160, French 160, German 160, Japanese 180, Korean 180, and Spanish 160 when appropriate, also qualify as foreign language literature-in-translation courses.

Emphasis in Creative Writing: English 100, Writing 101 (NOTE: Writing 101 may be substituted for English 101 in the major requirement); completion of a portfolio; specific course work (below) in either Poetry of Fiction. A further, optional course, Writing 115, may be taken as a tutorial.

   Poetry: English 28D, Writing 30, 90; students may additionally take Writing 111 after submitting work in advance.

   Fiction: English 28E, Writing 31, 91; students may additionally take Writing 110 after submitting work in advance.

Residence Requirement for the English Major: English 100, 101, two 102s, and 106 must be completed successfully at UCI.

Departmental Requirements for the English Minor

Three courses selected from English 28A, 28B, 28C, 28D, 28E; and at least five Departmental (English, Literary Journalism, Writing) courses numbered 102 or higher (excluding Writing 139), although two courses from the following may be substituted: English 100, English 101, Writing 101.

Residence Requirement for the English Minor: Four upper-division courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the department undergraduate chair.

Departmental Requirements for the Literary Journalism Major

A.   Literary Journalism 20, 21, 100.

B.   One course from the English 28 series*, English 105.

C.   Literary Journalism 101A, 101B (three times, on various topics).

D.   At least three more Departmental courses numbered 102 or above (excluding English 150, Writing 139, or Writing 179), for one of which may be substituted an upper-division foreign literature-in-translation course offered in the School of Humanities (that is, requisite courses in Classics, Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Literatures, French and Italian, German, Spanish and Portuguese).

E.   Two upper-division History courses in a single regional or thematic focus area.

   *Students can substitute Comparative Literature 60A or 60C for any one English 28 course.

Residence Requirement for the Literary Journalism Major: Literary Journalism 20, 21, 100, 101A, and three 101B course must be completed successfully at UCI.

PLANNING A PROGRAM OF STUDY

Students should plan coherent programs of study with their faculty advisors, including undergraduate seminars, workshops and seminars in writing (for students choosing a Literary Journalism major or Creative Writing emphasis), and courses in allied areas outside the Department. It is possible to combine a cluster of courses in literature with other majors in the sciences and social sciences, and to use an English or Literary Journalism major as preprofessional training in government, law, or medicine. Students who wish advice in planning such programs should consult both the Department and people in their prospective professional areas.

A student who intends to continue with graduate work is urged to study a second foreign language before graduation.

Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity to study abroad through the UC Education Abroad Program. See the Study Abroad Center section of the Catalogue or an academic counselor for additional information.

Graduate Program

The Department's three principal undergraduate offerings—English and American Literature, the English major with a Creative Writing emphasis, and Literary Journalism—are reflected in the graduate programs, which at this level, may also involve collaboration with the Department of Comparative Literature: M.A. and Ph.D. in English, M.F.A. in English (fiction/poetry), and an emphasis in Creative Nonfiction within the Ph.D. degree in English. The faculty is particularly equipped to guide students with special interests in criticism and theory, an area which candidates for the Ph.D. in English may stress by adding the Schoolwide Critical Theory emphasis. Applicants for graduate degrees in English must submit scores for the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Ordinarily students are not admitted to the English program unless they plan to continue, and are qualified to continue, to the degree of Ph.D. Students are admitted to the M.F.A. program chiefly on the basis of submitted creative work.

Specific requirements for the graduate degrees will be established by consultation between members of the faculty and the candidate. First-year graduate students or candidates for the Master of Fine Arts in English (fiction/poetry) plan a program with an assigned advisor; candidates for the Ph.D. plan with an advisor and three-person committee. At the time of the M.A. examination, the Graduate Committee evaluates the student's graduate career up to that point and offers advice about future prospects. Candidates for literary degrees are also encouraged to study philosophy, history, foreign languages and literatures, and the fine arts.

Only in exceptional circumstances will students be permitted to undertake programs of less than six full courses during the academic year. The normal expectation is enrollment in three courses each quarter; Teaching Assistants take two courses in addition to earning credit for University Teaching. Students who are not teaching should be able to complete course work in two years. The Ph.D. qualifying examination should be taken within a couple of quarters after courses are finished. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. in English is seven years.

The Murray Krieger Fellowship in Literary Theory is intended for an outstanding entering graduate student who is pursuing the Ph.D. in English or Comparative Literature and who demonstrates a primary interest in theory as theory relates to literary texts. A range of other fellowships is also available to students in the Department.

Emphasis in Creative Nonfiction

Students admitted to the emphasis in Creative Nonfiction must meet all course, language, and examination requirements for the Ph.D. in English. Their course work must include (a) three writing workshops in nonfiction; (b) three courses in nonfictional literature or rhetoric; and (c) if needed for the projected dissertation, one course outside the Department. Students must also conduct a dissertation defense.

School Emphases

Schoolwide graduate emphases are available in Asian American Studies, Critical Theory, and Feminist Studies. Refer to the appropriate sections of the Catalogue for information.

ENGLISH

Master of Arts in English

Each candidate for the M.A. will be assigned to a graduate advisor who will supervise the student's program. The M.A. plan of study includes (1) the completion of course work, as advised, for three quarters or the equivalent; (2) demonstrated proficiency in reading a designated foreign language, modern or classical; and (3) the submission of materials (including a statement about work accomplished and plans for future study, and a sample essay) to the Graduate Committee, who will review and assess the student's progress, recommend whether further study toward the Ph.D. is advisable, and, if so, give advice about areas for further study.

The Department of English sponsors a Summer M.A. Program in English designed for teachers and returning students. The M.A. degree in English is awarded to candidates who complete 32 units of graduate course work through two consecutive summers in the program and submit an acceptable Master's essay. Applicants from outside the State of California may apply for the program.

Master of Fine Arts in English

The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) is a degree in fiction writing or poetry. The M.F.A. degree is normally conferred upon the completion of a three-year residence. Each quarter the candidate will be enrolled in either the poetry or fiction section of the Graduate Writers' Workshop, which will constitute two-thirds of a course load, the other course to be selected in consultation with the student's advisor. It is expected that M.F.A. candidates will complete at least one supervised teaching seminar.

In addition to course work, the candidate is required to present as a thesis an acceptable book-length manuscript of poetry or short stories or a novel. The normative time for completion of the M.F.A. is three years, and the maximum time permitted is four years.

Doctor of Philosophy in English

The program for the Ph.D. in English requires about two years of full-time enrollment in regular courses beyond the B.A.; proficiency in the reading of one acceptable foreign language, modern or classical; satisfactory performance on designated examinations; and the dissertation.

The languages acceptable depends upon the nature of the student's program as determined by the student's advisors. Reading competence in this language must be established in the first year of residence. Competence in the language required for the Ph.D. is verified through examination.

Upon completion of course work the student is examined in three areas: (1) a primary field; (2) a secondary field; and (3) theory and/or criticism.

Upon satisfactorily completing this Qualifying Examination, the student is admitted to candidacy for the degree. As soon after completion of the Qualifying Examination as is practical, the student presents a dissertation prospectus for the approval of the doctoral committee. The dissertation itself must also be approved by the committee, which may or may not require an oral examination on it. All work for the Ph.D. degree must be in courses limited to graduate students. The normative time for advancement to candidacy is four years. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is seven years, and the maximum time permitted is nine years.

Courses in English

(Schedule of Classes designation: English)

LOWER-DIVISION

Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement is a prerequisite for all departmental courses. See the Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree section for information on fulfilling this requirement.

Descriptions of the topics to be offered in the undergraduate literary courses during a given year are available in the Department office in the fall.

10 Topics in English and American Literature (4). Explores the diversity of human expression manifested in selected works of literature. By engaging with substantial literary texts, students will think critically about how meaning is created and how experience is interpreted in literary language. May be take for credit three times as topics vary. (IV)

28 The Nature of Literature F, W, S, Summer. Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which these modes formulate experience. Students write several short analytic papers in each course; 28D and 28E also require creative writing. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement.

28A The Poetic Imagination (4). (IV)

28B Comic and Tragic Vision (4). (IV)

28C Realism and Romance (4). (IV)

28D The Craft of Poetry (4). (IV)

28E The Craft of Fiction (4). (IV)

UPPER-DIVISION

100 History of Literary Theory and Criticism from the Classics to the Present (4) F, W. A series of lectures and discussions beginning with a focus on ancient critics and literary theorists, and pursuing the issues they raise from medieval times to modernity. To be taken by English majors as early as possible in the junior year. Prerequisites: three courses from the English 28 series, or Literary Journalism 20, 21, and an English 28 course.

101 Undergraduate Seminar: Applications in Literary Theory and Criticism (4) F, W, S. Open to upper-division majors in English only. Sections limited to 20 students. Each instructor defines a theoretical, critical, or conceptual topic (e.g., theme, approach, genre) and explores it through an emphasis on literary texts. To be taken as early as possible in the junior year. Prerequisites: three courses from the English 28 series, or Literary Journalism 20, 21, and an English 28 course; and satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. May be taken for credit twice as topics vary.

102 English and American Literary History F, W, S, Summer. Studies of works representative of historical periods of literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre. Prerequisites: three courses from the English 28 series, or Literary Journalism 20, 21, and an English 28 course; English majors only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

102A Medieval and Renaissance Literature (4)

102B Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (4)

102C Romantic and Nineteenth-Century Literature (4)

102D Twentieth-Century Literature (4)

103 Topics in Literature, Theory, and Criticism (4) F, W, S, Summer. A series of lectures on and discussions of announced topics in literary criticism, theory, history, genres, modes, major authors. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; upper-division standing recommended. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

105 Multicultural Topics in Literatures in English (4) F, W, S. Focuses on ethnic or minority literatures, or treats issues related to race and cultural identity. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; upper-division standing recommended. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

106 Advanced Seminar (4). Capstone course. Required of all English majors. Limited to 25 students. Focuses on a topic within the area of literatures in English. Provides intensive work on a single topic in the field of English in a discussion setting. Prerequisites: English 101 or Writing 101 and at least two upper-division English courses; English major and senior standing. May be taken for credit twice as topics vary.

150 Topics in Literature for Nonmajors (4). Major texts in English, American, and Comparative Literature explored for basic humanistic issues and themes, on announced topics. Primarily for upper- division students, but not requiring previous training in literature. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. May not be counted toward the upper-division requirements for majors.

160 English Language Cinema (4). Focuses on any one of the different cinematic traditions in the English-speaking world, from a historical theoretical, or comparative perspective. May be taken for credit twice as topics vary.

187 Selected Topics in English Linguistics (4)

198 Special Topics (4-4-4). Directed group study of selected topics. By consent, by arrangement.

199 Reading and Conference (1 to 4). To be taken only when the materials to be studied lie outside the normal run of departmental offerings, and when the student will have no formal chance to pursue the subject. Prerequisites: consent of the student's advisor, the instructor, and the Department Chair.

Courses in Literary Journalism

(Schedule of Classes designation: Lit Jrn)

LOWER-DIVISION

20 Introduction to Literary Journalism (4). Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which literary journalism and related nonfiction modes formulate experience. Students complete a range of writing projects. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. Literary Journalism majors have first consideration for enrollment.

21 Reporting for Literary Journalism (4). Instruction and hands-on training in how to interview, report, research, and collect the types of information needed to write literary journalism. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement. Literary Journalism majors have first consideration for enrollment.

UPPER-DIVISION

100 Advanced Reporting (4). Practical engagement with advanced reporting techniques of Literary Journalism, emphasizing the importance of thorough and effective research in the production of high-quality journalistic writing. Prepares students to make good decisions about where and how to publish their writing. Prerequisite: Literary Journalism 21.

101A Studies in the History, Theory, and Ethics of Literary Journalism (4). Required of upper-division majors in Literary Journalism. Lectures and discussion on topics that explore the historical and theoretical dimensions of literary journalism, with particular emphasis on the evolution of ethics in the field. Prerequisites: Literary Journalism 20, 21, and one course from the English 28 or Comparative Literature 60 series or equivalent.

101B Literary Journalism Core Writing Seminar (4). Limited to 20 students. Writing seminars in announced specialized genres that students will both study and practice. Examples: "The Memoir"; "Review Writing"; "The Editorial"; "Writing Biography"; "The Profile"; "Political Writing." Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement and Literary Journalism 101A. May be taken for credit three times as topics vary. Students may enroll in a maximum of one 101B course per quarter.

103 Lectures on Topics in Literary Journalism (4). A series of lectures on, and discussions of, announced topics in literary journalism and the literature of fact. Examples: "Writing the Palate"; "Early Modern Women in the Public Sphere"; "Victorian Cultural Critics"; "Writing about War." Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; upper-division standing recommended. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

198 Special Topics (4-4-4). Directed group study of selected topics. By consent, by arrangement.

199 Reading and Conference (1 to 4). To be taken only when the materials to be studied lie outside the normal run of departmental offerings, or when students have obtained internships at local publications. Prerequisites: consent of the student's advisor, the instructor, and the Literary Journalism Program Director.

Courses in Writing

(Schedule of Classes designation: Writing)

LOWER-DIVISION

30 The Art of Writing: Poetry (4) F, W, S. Beginners' workshop in the writing of poetry, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement. May be repeated once for credit with a different instructor. (I)

31 The Art of Writing: Prose Fiction (4) F, W, S. Beginners' workshop in fiction writing, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement. May be repeated once for credit with a different instructor. (I)

37 Intensive Writing (6) F. Seminar, four and one-half hours. Offers instruction in the process of writing, rhetorical principles, and sentence-level mechanics. Provides guided practice in writing. Readings selected from current fiction and nonfiction; writing assignments require analysis of readings and demonstration of rhetorical principles. Successful completion of Writing 37 with letter grade of C or above satisfies the UC Entry Level Writing requirement and one quarter of the lower-division writing requirement. Students who earn a grade of C- or below must immediately enroll instead in Writing 39A, followed by 39B in a subsequent quarter. Students must satisfy the UC Entry Level Writing requirement before the beginning of their fourth quarter of residency. Prerequisite: students must have taken the Analytical Writing Placement Examination. Enrollment open only to recommended students. Only one course from Writing 37, 39A, or 39AP may be taken for credit. (I)

39A Introduction to Writing and Rhetoric (4) F, W, S, Summer. Seminar, three hours. Course may be offered online. Deals with the writing of expository essays, principles of rhetoric, paragraph development, and the fundamentals of sentence-level mechanics. Frequent papers, some exercises. Successful completion of Writing 39A with a letter grade of C or above satisfies the UC Entry Level Writing requirement. Students who earn a grade of C- or below must repeat the course, normally in the next quarter of residency. Prerequisite: students must have taken the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination with placement in Writing 39A. Students must satisfy the UC Entry Level Writing requirement before the beginning of their fourth quarter of residency. Only one course from Writing 37, 39A, or 39AP may be taken for credit.

39AP Introduction to Writing and Rhetoric with Lab (4) F, W, S, Summer. Seminar, three hours; lab, one and one-half hours. Deals with the writing of expository essays, principles of rhetoric, paragraph development, and the fundamentals of sentence-level mechanics. Frequent papers, some exercises. Successful completion of Writing 39AP with a letter grade of C or above satisfies the UC Entry Level Writing requirement. Students who earn a grade of C- or below must repeat the course, normally in the next quarter of residency. Prerequisite: students must have taken the Analytical Writing Placement Examination with placement in Writing 39AP. Students also directed to take the Academic English Placement Test must have completed all Academic English courses required as a result of that test. Students must satisfy the UC Entry Level Writing requirement before the beginning of their fourth quarter of residency, or immediately following completion of their Academic English requirement. Only one course from Writing 37, 39A, or 39AP may be taken for credit.

39B Critical Reading and Rhetoric (4) F, W, S, Summer. Seminar, three hours. Course may be offered online. Guided practice in the critical reading and written analysis of both popular and academic prose. Readings selected from literary, academic, journalistic, and fictional genres; writing topics require rhetorical analysis of readings and demonstration of rhetorical principles in student writing. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement. Writing 39B and Writing 37 may not both be taken for credit. (I)

39C Argument and Research (4) F, W, S, Summer. Course may be offered online. Guided writing practice in argumentation, logic, and inquiry. Readings are selected from current nonfiction and from materials students select from the University Library. Research strategies emphasized. Prerequisite: Writing 37 or 39B. (I)

90 Intermediate Poetry Writing (4). Intermediate workshop in the writing of poetry, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings. Prerequisite: Writing 30 or equivalent. May be repeated once for credit with a different instructor.

91 Intermediate Fiction Writing (4). Intermediate workshop in the writing of fiction, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings. Prerequisite: Writing 31 or equivalent. May be repeated once for credit with a different instructor.

UPPER-DIVISION

101 Undergraduate Seminar: Applications in Literary Theory and Criticism for Creative Writing (4). Substitute for English 101 for Creative Writing emphasis students. Prerequisites: English 100; satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement; open to English and Literary Journalism majors only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

109 Nonfiction and Journalism (4). The course develops out of Writing 38 for students with special competence for advanced work in journalism. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

110 Short Story Writing (4) F, W, S. Three-hour workshop in short fiction; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts. May be repeated once for credit toward graduation, but not repeated for credit within the major. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

111 Poetry Writing (4) F, W, S. Three-hour advanced poetry writing workshop; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts. May be repeated once for credit toward graduation, but not repeated for credit within the major. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

113 Novel Writing (4). Three-hour advanced workshop in fiction writing; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

115 Conference in Writing (4). Primarily for writing emphasis seniors. May be repeated for credit toward graduation but not repeated for credit within the major. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

139 Advanced Expository Writing (4) F, W, S, Summer. Study of rhetorical techniques; practice in writing clear and effective prose. Several essays of varying lengths, totaling at least 4,000 words. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement and upper-division standing. May not be counted toward the upper-division requirements for majors or minors. (I)

179 Advanced Composition for Teachers (4). Principles of formal composition and problems of teaching. Selecting handbooks and ancillary reading, marking papers, making assignments, and conducting workshops and tutorials. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement and upper-divsion standing. Same as Education 179.

Graduate Courses

All graduate courses may be repeated when the topic varies. Descriptions of the topics to be treated in a given academic year are published by the Department in the fall. Enrollment in each graduate course requires the consent of the instructor. The courses are limited to registered graduate students, except for specially qualified fifth-year students seeking teaching credentials, who may enroll if they have first received permission from the Department's Graduate Committee and if space permits.

In addition to the following courses, graduate students in the Department of English might find Humanities 200 (The Nature and Theory of History) and Humanities 291 (Interdisciplinary Topics) of special interest.

ENGLISH

210 Studies in Literary History (4) F, W, S

215 Prospectus Workshop (2) F. Workshop for the writing of the graduate student prospectus for those who have completed their qualifying examinations. Topics covered and assignments completed culminate in a presentation of a draft of the prospectus in class. Biweekly discussions.

225 Studies in Literary Genres (4) F, W, S

230 Studies in Major Writers (4) F, W, S

235 Methods of Literary Scholarship (4)

255 Graduate Workshop in Academic Publishing (4) F, W, S. Reading and critique of student-authored essays with the goal of producing a publishable essay. Instructor leads discussion, meets with students individually, and provides an introduction to appropriate venues for publication and the process of submission, peer review, and revision. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

290 Reading and Conference (4) F, W, S

291 Guided Reading Course (4)

299 Dissertation Research (4 to 12) F, W, S. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

398 Rhetoric/Teaching of Composition (4) F, W. Readings, lectures, and internship designed to prepare graduate students to teach composition. Formal instruction in rhetoric and practical work in teaching methods and grading. Consent of instructor required.

399 University Teaching (4) F, W, S. Limited to Teaching Assistants. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated for credit.

CRITICISM

220A, B Studies in Literary Theory and Its History (4, 4) F, W. Introduction to criticism and aesthetics for beginning graduate students. Readings from continental, English and American theorists. Same as Humanities 220A, B.

240 Advanced Theory Seminar (4) F, W, S

WRITING

250A-B Graduate Writers' Workshop (Fiction) (4-4) F, W, S. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

250C Graduate Writers' Workshop (Poetry) (8) F, W, S. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

251A-B Writing in Conference (Fiction) (4-4) F, W, S. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

251C Writing in Conference (Poetry) (8) F, W, S. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

252 Workshop/Nonfiction (4). Reading and critique of student manuscripts in creative nonfiction. The instructor leads discussions and meets with students on an individual basis. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. May be taken for credit three times.