INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES, CONTINUED

Graduate Study

Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology
Graduate Program in Networked Systems
Graduate Program in Transportation Science

Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology

Graduate Student Affairs: (949) 824-1239
http://www.pharmsci.uci.edu

The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Department of Pharmacology join forces to offer an interdisciplinary program leading to a Ph.D. degree in Pharmacology and Toxicology. The Ph.D. degree prepares students for careers in academia, research institutions, and the pharmaceutical industry by providing a research-intensive approach to the study of pharmaceutical sciences.

Faculty research programs in Pharmaceutical Sciences that are available through this program currently include organic, medicinal, and bioorganic chemistry; structural biology; structure-based drug design; high-throughput screening; molecular neuropharmacology; the pharmacology of aging; natural product biosynthesis and synthase engineering; cancer prevention and therapy; gene regulation and intercellular signaling; computational biology and bioinformatics; and nanomedicine for targeted drug and gene delivery. Information about the Department of Pharmaceutical
Sciences faculty and their research programs is available at http://www.pharmsci.uci.edu/faculty.php.

Faculty research programs in Pharmacology that are currently available through this program include molecular and cellular pharmacology, neurosciences, gene regulation, circadian rhythms, epigenetic modifications, neuropharmacology, psychopharmacology, and cardiovascular pharmacology. Emphasis is placed on providing an integrated understanding of drug receptors: their structure, location, and function; molecular aspects of drug action; receptor signaling mechanisms; structure-activity relationships and drug design; and the role of receptors and drugs in development and aging, plasticity, reinforcement and drug abuse, neural disorders, and cardiovascular physiology and disease. Information about the Department of Pharmacology faculty and their research programs is available at http://www.pharmacology.uci.edu/index.asp?p=154.

Prerequisites for admission include a bachelor's degree in one of the core disciplines of the pharmaceutical sciences, namely a physical science (including computer science), a biological science, biochemical or biomedical engineering, or allied field. Non-biological sciences majors must have passed a minimum of two quarters (or one semester) of introductory biology. In addition, courses in biochemistry, pharmacology, protein structure and function, biophysics or related fields would be a plus regardless of major. The general Graduate Record Examination is required for admission; subject GRE exams are optional but can provide valuable additional information to the admissions committee in marginal applications.

The graduate program requires a diverse group of classroom courses selected by the student in consultation with the Graduate Advisor. The departmental requirements leave the student a great deal of latitude in choosing an area of emphasis. In keeping with this principle and the highly interdisciplinary nature of pharmaceutical science, and subject to the approval of the Graduate Advisor, students may take graduate courses in allied fields outside the department such as Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, Engineering, or Computer Science. Similarly, up to eight units of graduate courses taken through UCI University Extension and/or UCI upper-division undergraduate classes can be counted toward the elective course requirements with prior written approval from the Graduate Advisor. In addition, two lab rotations of one quarter in length are required.

Sample Program - Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Toxicology

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

Year 1

Phrm 254 (Methods in Pharmacol)

PhrmSci 250B

PhrmSci 250C

PhrmSci 223 (Bio Macromol)

PhrmSci 277 (Med Chem)

Phrm 255 (Chem Transm)

PhrmSci 250A

PhrmSci 260 (Computnl Bio)

PhrmSci 274 (Biopharmceu)

PhrmSci 280 or Phrm 299
(Research, Rotation)

PhrmSci 280 or Phrm 299
(Research, Rotation)

PhrmSci 399 (Teaching)

Year 2

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

PhrmSci 399 (Teaching)

Year 3

Advancement Exam (Orals)

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

Years 4-5

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

PhrmSci 280 (Research)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

Phrm 298 (Seminar)

For course descriptions, see the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, page 434, and the Department of Pharmacology, page 425.

Advancement to candidacy for the Ph.D. normally takes place in the third year and is based on an oral and written exam assessing overall performance and progress in the program. Students may also receive the M.S. degree after completion of appropriate requirements. The main additional requirement for the Ph.D. is the satisfactory completion and oral defense of a written dissertation based on original research carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. All candidates for the Ph.D. degree are required to engage in research activities throughout the course of their academic programs. This requirement applies to all students whether or not they are compensated for such services. An appointment as a graduate student researcher is awarded on the basis of scholarship and not as compensation for services rendered.

The normative time for advancement to candidacy is three years, and all requirements for the Ph.D. degree should be completed within five years (the maximum time permitted is seven years). For more information, contact the Graduate Program Director/Advisor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Graduate Program in Networked Systems

(949) 824-1755
http://www.networkedsystems.uci.edu
Gene Tsudik (Director)
Athina Markopoulou (Co-Director)

Faculty

The graduate program in Networked Systems is administered by faculty from two academic units: the Department of Computer Science (CS) in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences, and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering. The program offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Networked Systems.

The Networked Systems program provides education and research opportunities to graduate students in the areas of computer and telecommunication networks. Networked Systems include telephone, cable TV networks, wireless, mobile, ad hoc, and cellular phone networks, as well as the Internet. Networked Systems, as a field, is inherently interdisciplinary since it combines technology in software, hardware, and communications. As a result, it transcends traditional departmental boundaries. Networked Systems draws primarily from Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Electrical Engineering. At UCI, these areas are housed in two departments: CS and EECS. The Networked Systems program unites the respective strengths of these two departments and provides integrated M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in this area.

Program requirements include core, breadth, and concentration courses. Core courses are taken by all Networked Systems students and form a foundation for networking topics. Breadth courses may be selected from technical courses (including distributed systems, algorithms, data structures, operating systems, databases, random processes, and linear systems) and management and applications of technology (including educational technology, management of information technology, and social impact). Concentration courses may be selected from a long list including courses on networks, performance, middleware, communications, and operations research. Core, breadth, and concentration course lists are available on the Networked Systems Web site (http://www.networkedsystems.uci.edu) or from the Networked Systems Program Office.

Admission

Prospective graduate students apply directly to the Networked Systems program, specifying M.S. or Ph.D. degree goal. Applicants who do not hold a bachelor's degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or Electrical Engineering may be required to take supplementary course work to obtain and demonstrate sufficient background in the field.

Applicants are evaluated on the basis of prior academic record and potential for creative research and teaching, as demonstrated in their application materials including official university transcripts, letters of recommendation, GRE test scores, and statement of purpose.

Master of Science Program

Students pursuing the M.S. degree may choose either Plan I (Thesis Plan) or Plan II (Comprehensive Examination Plan). Students following Plan I must complete the three core courses, two courses chosen from the breadth course list with at most one chosen from the Management and Applications of Technology list, three courses chosen from the concentration course lists with at least one course chosen from at least two different concentrations, two additional courses chosen with the approval of the advisor, and a thesis. In addition, students pursuing Plan I must enroll in two courses of thesis-related research: CS 298 or EECS 296.

Students following Plan II must complete the three core courses, three courses chosen from the breadth course list with at most two chosen from the Management and Applications of Technology list, four courses chosen from the concentration course lists with at least one course chosen from at least three different concentrations, and two additional courses chosen with the approval of the advisor. Students pursuing this option must also pass a comprehensive examination which will be administered through Networked Systems 295 and will consist of a term paper on a topic relevant to the student's educational program and that term's speakers.

Doctor of Philosophy Program

The Ph.D. degree requires the following 13 courses: three core courses; three courses chosen from the breadth course list, with at most two chosen from the Management and Applications of Technology list; four courses chosen from the concentration course lists, with at least one course chosen from at least three different concentrations; and three additional courses, chosen with the approval of the research advisor. Students must also complete two teaching practicum courses (ICS 399) and a dissertation.

Courses applied to the M.S. degree can also be applied to the Ph.D. degree. Students who have taken similar graduate-level courses at another university may petition to apply these courses to the Ph.D. requirements. Ph.D. students who have served as teaching assistants, readers, or tutors at another university may petition to apply this experience toward the teaching practicum requirement. Normative time for advancement to candidacy is three years (two for students who entered with a master's degree). Normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is six years (five for students who entered with a master's degree), and maximum time permitted is seven years.

Courses in Networked Systems

(Schedule of Classes designation: Net Sys)

201 Computer and Communication Networks (4). Network architecture of the Internet, telephone networks, cable networks, and cell phone networks. Network performance models. Advanced concepts and implementations of flow and congestion control, addressing, internetworking, forwarding, routing, multiple access, streaming, and quality-of-service. Prerequisite: EECS148, Computer Science 132, or consent of instructor. Same as EECS248A and Computer Science 232.

202 Networking Laboratory (4). A laboratory-based introduction to basic networking concepts such as addressing, sub-netting, bridging, ARP, and routing. Network simulation and design. Structured around weekly readings and laboratory assignments. Prerequisite: EECS148 or Computer Science 132. Same as Computer Science 233.

210 Advanced Networks (4). Design principles of networked systems, advanced routing and congestion control algorithms, network algorithms, network measurement, management, security, Internet economics, and emerging networks. Prerequisite: Networked Systems 201 or Computer Science 232 or EECS248A. Same as Computer Science 234.

230 Wireless and Mobile Networking (4). Introduction to wireless networking. The focus is on layers 2 and 3 of the OSI reference model, design, performance analysis, and protocols. Topics covered include: an introduction to wireless networking, digital cellular, next generation cellular, wireless LANs, and mobile IP. Prerequisites: EECS148 or Computer Science 132, and an introductory course in probability or consent of instructor. Same as Computer Science 236.

240 Network and Distributed Systems Security (4). Overview of modern computer and networks security: attacks and countermeasures. Authentication, identification, data secrecy, data integrity, authorization, access control, computer viruses, network security. Group communication and multicast security techniques. Also covers secure e-commerce and applications of public key methods, digital certificates, and credentials. Prerequisite: EECS148 or Computer Science 132. Same as Computer Science 203.

256 Network Coding: Theory and Applications (4). Theoretical frameworks for network coding: linear, algebraic, and random network coding; linear programming and combinatorial frameworks. Network code design. Benefits and costs. Practical network coding. Applications to wireless networks, content distribution, security, and other areas. Prerequisites: EECS248A/Networked Systems 201/Computer Science 232 and an introductory course in linear algebra. Same as EECS246.

260 Middleware for Networked and Distributed Systems (4). Discusses concepts, techniques, and issues in developing distributed systems middleware that provides high performance and Quality of Service for emerging applications. Also covers existing standards (e.g., CORBA, DCOM, Jini, Espeak) and their relative advantages and shortcomings. Prerequisite: undergraduate-level course in operating systems and networks or consent of instructor. Same as Computer Science 237.

261 Distributed Computer Systems (4). Design and analysis techniques for decentralized computer architectures, communication protocols, and hardware-software interface. Performance and reliability considerations. Design tools. Prerequisites: EECS211 and EECS213. Same as EECS218.

270 Topics in Networked Systems (4). Study of Networked Systems concepts. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

295 Networked Systems Seminar (1) F, W, S. Current research in networked systems. Includes talks by UCI faculty, visiting researchers, and Networked Systems graduate students. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. May be repeated for credit.

Graduate Program in Transportation Science

(949) 824-5989, -5906; Fax (949) 824-8385
http://www.transci.uci.edu/
Jean-Daniel Saphores, Director

Faculty

The graduate program in Transportation Science includes faculty from three academic units: the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, the Department of Economics in the School of Social Sciences, and the Department of Planning, Policy, and Design in the School of Social Ecology. The program is designed to educate students in a broad set of competencies and perspectives that mirror the actual practice of current transportation research. The M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Transportation Science are offered.

Admission

Admission is limited to a small number of exceptionally talented, independent, and self-disciplined students. The deadline for application for admission is March 1 for fall quarter. A second window for application for admission for winter or spring quarters is open from April 15 through June 1 but funding options for this second window may be very limited. All applicants must take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) prior to the application deadline. Applicants whose first language is not English must also submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores.

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE

The M.S. degree program has two options: (1) thesis; and (2) comprehensive examination. Students will choose one of these two options. For both options, no more than 12 credit hours of non-transportation courses can count toward the required number of course-work units. Exceptions must be approved by the student's advisor and the Director of the Transportation Science program. Opportunities are available for part-time study toward the M.S. degree. The normative time for completion of the M.S. is one year, and the maximum time permitted is four years, as part-time status is allowed.

Transportation courses must be chosen from lists in each of the three program areas. Each student must choose (1) at least three graduate courses from Area 1 (Transportation Systems Engineering), and (2) at least one graduate course from each of Area 2 (Urban and Transportation Economics) and Area 3 (Transportation Planning), and at least one additional graduate courses from either of these two areas.

Specific courses in each of these areas are shown below (transportation courses are indicated in bold):

Area 1 (Transportation Systems Engineering): CEE220A, CEE221A, CEE222, CEE224A, CEE225A, CEE225B, CEE226A, CEE227A, CEE228A, CEE229A.

Area 2 (Urban and Transportation Economics): Economics 210A-B, 281A-B, 282A-B, 289A-Z. NOTE: Economics 281A-B and 282A-B require Economics 210A or consent of the instructor. Students can only count one Economics 289 course toward the required number of units.

Area 3 (Transportation Planning): Planning, Policy, and Design 202, 207, 212, 223, 231, 233, 235, 237, 238, 242, 244, 252.

Pre-approved upper-division undergraduate courses, independent study units, or seminars:

A.   Pre-approved upper-division undergraduate courses: CEE121, CEE122, CEE123, CEE124, CEE125, Economics 105A-B, 123A-B, 149.

B.   Independent study units: CEE296, CEE298, CEE299, Economics 299, Planning, Policy, and Design 298, 299.

C.   Seminars: Economics 285A-B-C. At most two of these classes may count toward the required units.

D.   Students who choose the thesis option may also take up to eight units of CEE296 (4 to12 units) and Planning, Policy, and Design 298 (2 to 4 units).

Substitutions must be approved by the Transportation Science executive committee. Alternatively, students may petition the Director of the Transportation Science program after approval by their advisor.

Plan I: Thesis Option

Students who select the thesis option must complete at least 36 units of study, up to eight of which can be taken in conjunction with the thesis research topic (thesis units should be taken in the home department of the faculty advisor); they must also complete at least 28 units of course work with no more than eight units of pre-approved upper-division undergraduate courses, independent study units, or seminars. The thesis should reflect an original research investigation and it must be approved by a thesis committee of at least three full-time faculty members (a majority of which must be Transportation Science faculty) with primary appointments in at least two of the following departments: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Economics, and Planning, Policy and Design. Thesis research findings must be presented in a public seminar.

Plan II: Comprehensive Examination Option

Students who select the comprehensive examination option must successfully complete 36 units of course work and pass a comprehensive examination. These units may include no more than six units of pre-approved upper-division undergraduate courses, independent study units, or seminars. The comprehensive examination requirements may be met with a 20-page paper dealing with a transportation topic; this paper must be approved by the student's advisor and the Director of the Transportation Science program.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE

The Ph.D. degree indicates attainment of an original and significant research contribution to the state-of-the-art in the candidate's field, and an ability to communicate advanced concepts to a non-specialized audience. All students must complete a core curriculum consisting of eight courses from Civil Engineering, Economics, and Social Ecology plus the graduate colloquium. Students may apply to the Director of Enrollment and Graduate Academic Affairs for exemption from specific courses based upon the evidence of prior course work. Students also must successfully complete at least six courses from among the four specialization areas: (1) Methods and Analysis; (2) Transportation Systems Economics; (3) Traffic Analysis; and (4) Planning and Policy Analysis. At least four of these six courses must be from one specialization.

Students must complete the following general theory core courses:

Civil Engineering: CEE220A, CEE225A or CEE225B.

Urban Planning: Planning, Policy, and Design 202 or 212; Planning, Policy, and Design 223 or 242.

Economics: Economics H100A-B, 123A-B, and 282A-B.

Transportation Science: Economics 285A-B-C.

It is expected that all students will have sufficient background in one of the core disciplines to be exempted from some of the courses. Substitutions may be approved by the program director.

In addition to the general theory core courses, students must take at least six additional courses chosen from among the four specialization areas below.

Methods and Analysis Specialization: CEE220B, CEE223, CEE224A-B, CEE225A-B, CEE227A, CEE228A, CEE283; Economics 220A-D, 223A, 224A; Planning, Policy, and Design 206, 223, 237, 238, 242; Social Science 201A-B, 201C; Social Ecology 264A-B, 266A-B.

Transportation Systems Economics Specialization: Economics 210A-B, 241A-B, 281A-B.

Traffic Analysis Specialization: CEE221A-B, CEE226A-B, CEE227A, CEE228A-B, CEE229A-B.

Transportation Planning and Policy Analysis Specialization: CEE222, CEE225A-B, Economics 282A, Planning, Policy, and Design 202, 207, 212, 235, 242, 244, 252, 253, 275.

Other requirements include a replication project, in which students replicate the empirical work of a published paper from a major transportation journal; the qualifying examination, which consists of the oral defense of the student's dissertation proposal; and completion of the dissertation.

The normative time for advancement to candidacy is three years. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years, and the maximum time permitted is seven years.

Replication Project

Prior to preparing a dissertation proposal, each student who has not completed a master's thesis (or otherwise independently published) must replicate the empirical work of a published paper from a major transportation journal, chosen by the student and approved by the advisor. This replication may involve the collection of new data, the use of better statistical techniques, additional simulations, or the identification and correction of theoretical errors. Through the replication project, students gain direct experience in reducing a general problem to a manageable research project, in using data, and in carrying out a research project.

Qualifying Examination

Upon completion of the general theory core courses, the specialization area courses, and the replication requirements, each student must develop a dissertation proposal defining the research problem, related literature, research methods, and data resources. The Ph.D. qualifying examination consists of an oral defense of that proposal before a candidacy committee chosen according to normal campus regulations, upon the recommendation of the Graduate Director. Typically, this is a committee of at least three members of the Transportation Science faculty and at least one faculty member who is not associated with Transportation Science.

Dissertation Requirement

Following advancement to candidacy, the dissertation is supervised by a doctoral committee ordinarily consisting of at least three members of the candidacy committee, a majority of which must be Transportation Science faculty. The dissertation must demonstrate the student's ability to originate interesting and significant research problems, to investigate such problems both broadly and deeply, and to write scholarly material of publishable quality. Certification of the dissertation will be by the student's doctoral committee. Dissertation research units should be earned in the department selected by the chair of the candidacy committee (e.g., CEE297, Economics 290, or Social Ecology 296).

RESEARCH FACILITIES

UCI is a major research university and has an excellent library collection, as well as special interlibrary loan arrangements with other University of California libraries including the Transportation Library at Berkeley. Research is coordinated with the Irvine branch of the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS). Approximately 30 to 40 graduate students are employed as research assistants each year in ITS. Research covers a broad spectrum of transportation issues. Current funded research projects focus upon intelligent transportation systems (ITS), particularly advanced transportation management systems; planning and analysis of transportation systems; transportation systems operation and control; transportation engineering; transportation safety; road and congestion pricing; environmental and energy issues and demand for alternative fuel vehicles; public transit operations, transportation-land use interactions, demand for autos, and travel demand.

ITS is part of the University of California Transportation Center, one of ten federally designated centers of excellence for transportation research. The transportation research program at UCI is also supported by the Advanced Transportation Management Systems (ATMS) Laboratories. The Institute maintains a regular publications series documenting research conducted within its programs and is the editorial headquarters of the Journal of Regional Science.